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Selected Papers from the 4th International Electronic Conference on Environmental Research and Public Health—Climate Change and Health in a Broad Perspective

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 2885

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Guest Editor
Department of Public Health and Nursing, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromso, Norway
Interests: public health; epidemiology; environmental health; reproductive health; pregnancy care; climate change
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is in cooperation with the 4th International Electronic Conference on Environmental Research and Public Health, organized by the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) from 15–30 Oct 2022 on the MDPI Sciforum platform. We welcome submissions from participants of the conference, as well as those who do not participate.

We are proud to invite you to the 4th electronic conference, with the topic of Climate Change and Health in a broad perspective. This means that we invite papers on a wide variety of health consequences of climate change in all regions of the world. The health effects could be very different if we increase the temperature from 5 to 10 °C compared to an increase from 35 to 40 °C. If we look at the mortality causes associated with climate change, the burden is obviously higher in tropical areas. However, if we add morbidity and complications for, e.g., reproductive health and pregnancy care, the situation might be very different. The spread of infectious diseases related to vector migration is also a very important topic, as is the situation of environmental exposure to contaminants and occupational health. We leave these topics to you with an open mind. Please participate and contribute to a high-quality conference with good science, and good and important messages to stakeholders and policy-makers around the world. We wish you a warm welcome to our electronic conference.

Relevant topics could include:

  • Reproductive Health and Climate Change
  • Vector Migration from a Climate Perspective
  • COVID-19 from a Climate Perspective
  • The Forgotten Tropical Diseases from a Climate Perspective
  • Cardiovascular Diseases and Climate Change
  • Occupational Health and Temperature Change
  • We are also open to alternative topics of high scientific quality. 

Prof. Dr. Jon Øyvind Odland
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • ecology and the environment
  • climate
  • global health, environment sciences
  • public health
  • environmental microbiology
  • climate change science
  • climate change impacts

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 747 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between Bullshit Receptivity and Willingness to Share Misinformation about Climate Change: The Moderating Role of Pregnancy
by Kaisheng Lai, Yingxin Yang, Yuxiang Na and Haixia Wang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16670; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416670 - 12 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2475
Abstract
Widespread dissemination of misinformation about climate change has seriously harmed the health of future generations and the world. Moreover, misinformation-sharing behaviors exhibit strong individual characteristics. However, research is limited on the antecedents of and mechanism underlying the willingness to share misinformation about climate [...] Read more.
Widespread dissemination of misinformation about climate change has seriously harmed the health of future generations and the world. Moreover, misinformation-sharing behaviors exhibit strong individual characteristics. However, research is limited on the antecedents of and mechanism underlying the willingness to share misinformation about climate change in terms of individual personalities and physiological states. Accordingly, we surveyed 582 women (224 pregnant) using a questionnaire and constructed a moderated mediation model to explore the relationships among individuals’ bullshit receptivity, belief in misinformation about climate change, willingness to share misinformation about climate change, and pregnancy. The results showed that: (1) bullshit receptivity is positively related to the willingness to share misinformation about climate change; (2) belief in misinformation about climate change mediates the relationship between bullshit receptivity and willingness to share misinformation about climate change; and (3) for individuals with higher bullshit receptivity, pregnancy exacerbates the detrimental effects of bullshit receptivity on belief in misinformation about climate change. Full article
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