Special Issue "Interpersonal and Community Violence: Characteristics, Consequences, Prevention and Intervention"

A special issue of Psych (ISSN 2624-8611).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniela Acquadro Maran
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Via Giuseppe Verdi, 8, 10124 Torino TO, Italy
Interests: stalking; workplace harassment; stress; work-related stress; gender; volunteerism motivation
Dr. Tatiana Begotti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Via Giuseppe Verdi, 8, 10124 Torino TO, Italy
Interests: Risk behaviors in adolescence; life-skills promotion at school; internet use; bullying.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this Special Issue, we are interested in interpersonal violence, including aggression that occurs in intimate relationships and those actions perpetrated by strangers or acquaintances outside of family ties.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines “violence” as follows: “The intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person, or against a group or community that either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, mal-development, or deprivation” (www.who.int/violenceprevention/approach/definition/en/).

This definition emphasized that violence may take different forms: It can be interpersonal, self-directed, or collective.

Interpersonal violence refers to the intentional use of direct or indirect aggression and it can involve two or more people. It may be perpetrated by physical or verbal attacks, sexual assault, and it may also include withdrawal and isolation.

Interpersonal violence can concern intimate relationships (with a partner or within a family) or it can refer to community violence, which takes place among people who know each other more or less deeply outside of a family context. Violence can occur also among unknown people. This form of violence includes bullying, stalking, sexual harassment, and more in general the violence that takes place in institutional contexts such as schools or workplaces or in sport contexts, such as stadiums. 

This Special Issue aims to document the nature of the phenomenon, its consequences (at an individual, social, and economical levels), interventions, and prevention programs in different contexts. Contributions from across the globe, including non-western countries, are welcome. Learning from the failures, as well as successes, of prevention and intervention programs is important too. The listed keywords suggest only a few of many possibilities.

Dr. Daniela Acquadro Maran
Dr. Tatiana Begotti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Psych is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bullying
  • Bullying at work
  • Cyberbullying
  • Stalking
  • Cyberstalking
  • Incivility at work
  • Mobbing
  • Harassment
  • Sexual harassment
  • Workplace violence
  • Discrimination
  • Racial/ethnic harassment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Experience of Intimate Partner Violence and Help-Seeking Behaviour among Women in Uganda
Psych 2019, 1(1), 182-192; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych1010013 - 07 May 2019
Abstract
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is recognised as a fundamental violation of women’s human rights and a widespread phenomenon in Africa. Women’s low socioeconomic empowerment, cultural acceptability, and lack of social support exacerbate the health and psychosocial outcomes of IPV among African women. To [...] Read more.
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is recognised as a fundamental violation of women’s human rights and a widespread phenomenon in Africa. Women’s low socioeconomic empowerment, cultural acceptability, and lack of social support exacerbate the health and psychosocial outcomes of IPV among African women. To date, there is no systematic research on IPV and its association with healthcare use among adult women in Uganda. Therefore, we conducted the present study on IPV among Ugandan women of childbearing age (15–49 years). Cross-sectional data on 7536 women were collected from the Uganda Demographic and Health Survey (UDHS—Uganda Demographic and Health Survey 2016). The objectives were to assess the predictors of IPV as well as help-seeking behaviour for victims of IPV. IPV was assessed by women’s experience of physical, emotional and sexual violence and healthcare use was assessed by self-reported medical visits during the last 12 months. Logistic regression methods were used to analyse the data. According to descriptive findings, which showed that more than half of the women reported experiencing any IPV (55.3%, 95%CI = 53.6, 57.0), emotional IPV (41.2%, 95%CI = 39.6, 42.8) was the most prevalent of all three categories, followed by physical (39.3%, 95%CI = 37.7, 40.9) and sexual IPV (22.0%, 95%CI = 20.7, 23.3). In the multivariate analysis, higher age, rural residence, religious background (non-Christian), ethnicity (Banyankore and Itseo), secondary/higher education and husband’s alcohol drinking habit were positively associated with women’s experience of IPV. Husband’s alcohol drinking was found to be a significant barrier to seeking help among those who experienced IPV. In conclusion, our findings suggest a noticeably high prevalence of IPV among Ugandan women. There are important sociodemographic and cultural patterns in the occurrence of IPV that need to be taken into account when designing intervention policies. Special attention should be given to women living with husbands/partners who drink alcohol, as this might increase their odds of experiencing IPV, as well as reduce the likelihood of seeking help. Full article
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