Special Issue "Vaccine Hesitancy and COVID-19"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Disease Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Zahid Ahmad Butt
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Interests: HIV/HCV/HBV coinfections; vaccine preventable diseases; communicable and non-communicable disease syndemics; global health; big data; spatial analysis of complex data

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As Section Editor-in-Chief of the Section Infectious Disease Epidemiology of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, it is my pleasure to invite you to contribute articles to the Special Issue of the journal dedicated to vaccine hesitancy and COVID-19.

Vaccination is one of the most significant public health interventions for reducing the burden of infectious diseases globally. Vaccines have been instrumental in tackling several preventable diseases, such as polio, tetanus, tuberculosis, measles, mumps, and rubella. In fact, the most significant achievement of vaccination has been the eradication of smallpox. Despite the continued success of vaccination in preventing infectious diseases, the spread of misinformation and antivaccination movements have led to increased vaccine hesitancy all over the world. According to the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) working group, vaccine hesitancy can be defined as the “delay in acceptance or refusal of vaccination despite the availability of vaccine services”. Vaccine hesitancy has increased worldwide due to different factors and barriers that should be addressed to improve the acceptance of global vaccination programs in both developed and developing countries. The issue of vaccine hesitancy has become even more important in the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, it is imperative to conduct high-quality research that can examine and understand the factors related to vaccine hesitancy related to COVID-19.

This Special Issue of IJERPH is designed to enable the rapid publication and dissemination of innovative research with the aim of advancing the scientific knowledge and highlighting future perspectives on vaccine hesitancy associated with COVID-19 vaccines. We are interested in all aspects of COVID-19 research that relate to vaccine hesitancy. Potential topics on aspects of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy are listed below under the Keywords/Topics section.

Dr. Zahid Butt
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Vaccine hesitancy, especially related to COVID-19
  • Willingness or intention to use COVID-19 vaccines
  • Misinformation and disinformation related to COVID-19 vaccines
  • Social media and vaccine hesitancy
  • Methodological approaches to understand COVID-19 hesitancy
  • Vaccine complacency, convenience, and confidence

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Communication
Factors Associated with Intention to Receive Vaccination against COVID-19 in Puerto Rico: An Online Survey of Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7743; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157743 - 21 Jul 2021
Viewed by 616
Abstract
We conducted an online survey among adults in Puerto Rico to identify factors associated with the intention to receive vaccination against COVID-19. Sociodemographic variables were analyzed independently for association with intent to receive vaccination. Significant associations were included in the multivariate logistic regression [...] Read more.
We conducted an online survey among adults in Puerto Rico to identify factors associated with the intention to receive vaccination against COVID-19. Sociodemographic variables were analyzed independently for association with intent to receive vaccination. Significant associations were included in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 1016 responses were available for analysis. In the bivariate analysis, younger age, higher education, pre-COVID-19 employment, male sex, gay/bisexual identity, and single marital status were associated with increased intent to receive the vaccination. In the multivariate logistic regression, younger, male respondents, and those with higher educational attainment reported higher intent to receive the vaccination. Lower-income and living outside the San Juan metro region were associated with lower intent to receive the vaccination. National and international health organizations were identified as the most reliable sources of information, followed by healthcare professionals. These findings highlight the importance of considering sociodemographic characteristics and using trusted sources of information when designing COVID-19 vaccination public messaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vaccine Hesitancy and COVID-19)
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