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Article

Caregiver Willingness to Vaccinate Their Children against COVID-19 after Adult Vaccine Approval

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The Pediatric Research in Emergency Therapeutics (PRETx) Program, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, BC Children’s Hospital Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3N1, Canada
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Ziv Medical Center, Pediatric Emergency Unit, Azrieli Faculty of Medicine, Bar-Ilan University, Safed 5290002, Israel
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Departments of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, Women and Children’s Health Research Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada
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Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B5, Canada
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Division of Emergency and Transport Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, USC Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
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Biostatistical Lead, Research Informatics, BC Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4H4, Canada
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Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, Alberta Children’s Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
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Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Children’s Health, Dallas, TX 75235, USA
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Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
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Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Hadera and Technion Faculty of Medicine, Haifa 38100, Israel
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Seattle Children’s Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
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Department of Pediatrics, Section of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80204, USA
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Shamir Medical Center, Pediatric Emergency Medicine Unit, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
For the International COVID-19 Parental Attitude Study (COVIPAS) Group. A complete list of the COVIPAS group appears in the Acknowledgements.
Academic Editor: Zahid Ahmad Butt
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10224; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910224
Received: 31 August 2021 / Revised: 19 September 2021 / Accepted: 23 September 2021 / Published: 28 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vaccine Hesitancy and COVID-19)
Vaccines against COVID-19 are likely to be approved for children under 12 years in the near future. Understanding vaccine hesitancy in parents is essential for reaching herd immunity. A cross-sectional survey of caregivers in 12 emergency departments (ED) was undertaken in the U.S., Canada, and Israel. We compared reported willingness to vaccinate children against COVID-19 with an initial survey and post-adult COVID-19 vaccine approval. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed for all children and for those <12 years. A total of 1728 and 1041 surveys were completed in phases 1 and 2, respectively. Fewer caregivers planned to vaccinate against COVID-19 in phase 2 (64.5% and 59.7%, respectively; p = 0.002). The most significant positive predictor of willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 was if the child was vaccinated per recommended local schedules. Fewer caregivers plan to vaccinate their children against COVID-19, despite vaccine approval for adults, compared to what was reported at the peak of the pandemic. Older caregivers who fully vaccinated their children were more likely to adopt vaccinating children. This study can inform target strategy design to implement adherence to a vaccination campaign. View Full-Text
Keywords: vaccine hesitancy; parental attitudes; COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy; parental attitudes; COVID-19
MDPI and ACS Style

Goldman, R.D.; Krupik, D.; Ali, S.; Mater, A.; Hall, J.E.; Bone, J.N.; Thompson, G.C.; Yen, K.; Griffiths, M.A.; Klein, A.; Klein, E.J.; Brown, J.C.; Mistry, R.D.; Gelernter, R.; on behalf of the International COVID-19 Parental Attitude Study Group. Caregiver Willingness to Vaccinate Their Children against COVID-19 after Adult Vaccine Approval. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 10224. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910224

AMA Style

Goldman RD, Krupik D, Ali S, Mater A, Hall JE, Bone JN, Thompson GC, Yen K, Griffiths MA, Klein A, Klein EJ, Brown JC, Mistry RD, Gelernter R, on behalf of the International COVID-19 Parental Attitude Study Group. Caregiver Willingness to Vaccinate Their Children against COVID-19 after Adult Vaccine Approval. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(19):10224. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910224

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goldman, Ran D., Danna Krupik, Samina Ali, Ahmed Mater, Jeanine E. Hall, Jeffrey N. Bone, Graham C. Thompson, Kenneth Yen, Mark A. Griffiths, Adi Klein, Eileen J. Klein, Julie C. Brown, Rakesh D. Mistry, Renana Gelernter, and on behalf of the International COVID-19 Parental Attitude Study Group. 2021. "Caregiver Willingness to Vaccinate Their Children against COVID-19 after Adult Vaccine Approval" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 19: 10224. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910224

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