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Sustainable Drinking Water Resources Management

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 8152

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Engineering, University of Calabria, 87036 Rende, Italy
Interests: sustainable management of water resources; vulnerability and management of drinking water supply systems; optimal allocation of water resources; hydraulic engineering; coastal vulnerability and maritime engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Engineering (DIAm – Unical), Capo Tirone Experimental Marine Station, University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende, Italy
Interests: sustainable water management; drinking water risk; water supply systems; water pollution; groundwater hydrology and protection of groundwater; coastal dynamics, rehabilitation and remediation of coastal environments
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
SINTEF Community, 0314 Oslo, Norway
Interests: infrastructure asset management applied to urban water networks (including reliability analysis, condition assessment, risk management); water safety plans; water security plans; cyber–physical protection of critical infrastructure
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The sustainable management of drinking water resources and infrastructure is a topic of current interest due to multiple challenges, such as climate change, the deterioration of water resource quality, growing demand, and the deterioration of most water distribution systems worldwide (affecting, among other things, the availability of water). These challenges can trigger vulnerability to factors such as natural hazards, contamination, and component failures, as well as increase the potential for man-made threats and intentional attacks.

All aspects of water distribution system component failures deal with the system’s inability to provide the minimum levels of service and meet quantity, quality and energy use targets.  Vulnerability due to natural hazards relates to the consequences of events such as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, etc., including aspects of emergency management.

Safe drinking water is central for individuals and society. Man-made threats include accidental contamination, physical damage, and malicious incidents due to intentional cyber and physical attacks. The consequences of these events, and the interruption of drinking water services, have far-reaching public health, economic, environmental, and psychological impacts.

In recent years, the development and integration of multidisciplinary methods, also boosted by innovative digital approaches, have allowed significant advancements in the field of drinking water management. This encompasses components, quality monitoring, system resilience, hazard forecasting and impact mitigation techniques.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect contributions that discuss methodological and multi-disciplinary approaches to assess the sustainable management of drinking water resources and the vulnerability of drinking water distribution systems.  Such discussion will help to improve the security of these systems, the safety of people, and protection of the environment, in accordance with the overall goals of sustainability.

Dr. Daniela Pantusa
Dr. Mario Maiolo
Dr. Rita Maria Ugarelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change impacts and adaptations
  • water demand
  • water quality
  • reliability and resilience of water distribution systems
  • threats due to natural events
  • cyber-physical hazard and cascading effects
  • emergency management
  • pressure and water loss management
  • optimization of water distribution systems
  • innovative management tools

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

24 pages, 5920 KiB  
Article
A Risk-Based Approach in Rehabilitation of Water Distribution Networks
by Gema Sakti Raspati, Stian Bruaset, Camillo Bosco, Lars Mushom, Birgitte Johannessen and Rita Ugarelli
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1594; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031594 - 30 Jan 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2400
Abstract
A risk-based approach to support water utilities in terms of defining pipe rehabilitation priorities is presented. In a risk analysis in the risk management process, the probability that a given event will happen and the consequences if it does happen have to be [...] Read more.
A risk-based approach to support water utilities in terms of defining pipe rehabilitation priorities is presented. In a risk analysis in the risk management process, the probability that a given event will happen and the consequences if it does happen have to be estimated and combined. In the quantitative risk analysis, numerical values are assigned to both consequence and probability. In this study, the risk event addressed was the inability to supply water due to pipe breaks. Therefore, on the probability side, the probability of pipes breaking was assessed, and on the consequence side, the reduced ability to satisfy the water demand (hydraulic reliability) due to pipe breakage was computed. Random Forest analysis was implemented for the probability side, while the Asset Vulnerability Analysis Toolkit was used to analyse the network’s hydraulic reliability. Pipes could then be ranked based on the corresponding risk magnitude, thereby feeding a risk evaluation step; at this step, decisions are made concerning which risks need treatment, and also concerning the treatment priorities, i.e., rehabilitation priorities. The water distribution network of Trondheim, Norway, was used as a case study area, and this study illustrates how the developed method aids the development of a risk-based rehabilitation plan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Drinking Water Resources Management)
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22 pages, 2229 KiB  
Article
Optimisation of Fixed-Outlet and Flow-Modulated Pressure Reduction Measures in Looped Water Distribution Networks Constrained by Fire-Fighting Capacity Requirements
by Marius Møller Rokstad
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7088; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18137088 - 2 Jul 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1807
Abstract
Pressure management is a pivotal component when reducing leakages from water distribution networks, and can be achieved by sub-dividing existing networks into partitions where the pressure can be reduced effectively. There is a need to develop methods that aid in the identification of [...] Read more.
Pressure management is a pivotal component when reducing leakages from water distribution networks, and can be achieved by sub-dividing existing networks into partitions where the pressure can be reduced effectively. There is a need to develop methods that aid in the identification of cost-effective partitions for pressure reduction, while simultaneously verifying that the topological changes entailed in these solutions do not compromise reliability and (fire-fighting) capacity requirements, especially in systems where the capacity is ensured through looped networks. This paper presents a method that can be used to this end, in which a novel combination of hydraulic simulations and graph theory is used to determine the maximal potential for (dynamic and static) pressure reduction, and this is used as a constraint for multi-objective optimization of pressure reduction measures. Trondheim, Norway, has been used as a case study area, and it is demonstrated how the developed method aids in the process of achieving leakage reduction in Trondheim. The results for Trondheim show that an economically optimal solution for pressure management is predicted to lead to a reduction from 28 to 22% water loss volume, and furthermore that effective pressure management will rely heavily on active (dynamic) regulation in this particular system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Drinking Water Resources Management)
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13 pages, 1334 KiB  
Article
Long-Term Sustainability of Water Cellars in Traditional Chinese Villages: Factors Influencing Continuous Use and Effective Water Management Initiatives
by Weinan Zhou, Kunihiko Matsumoto and Masanori Sawaki
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4394; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094394 - 21 Apr 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2503
Abstract
Traditional rainwater harvesting systems have seen a shift of emphasis in recent years. While recognizing its social, economic and environmental contributions, sustainable use in a modern context can be vulnerable. Through a case study, this study focuses on the long-term sustainability of water [...] Read more.
Traditional rainwater harvesting systems have seen a shift of emphasis in recent years. While recognizing its social, economic and environmental contributions, sustainable use in a modern context can be vulnerable. Through a case study, this study focuses on the long-term sustainability of water cellars in traditional villages if reliable piped water is introduced. The aim is to discern the factors and renovation methods that influence residents’ willingness to continue using these water cellars. The results show that the overall willingness to use them is very low. However, regardless of their continued use or non-use, only a few residents would landfill them. Most residents were interested in their renovation, especially regarding simplifying rainwater harvesting methods. In addition, the management time for rainwater harvesting and heritage identity is positively correlated with the willingness for sustainable use; conversely, the identification of the environmental contribution has no positive correlation. Given these findings, we propose carrying out effective renovation that changes the rainwater catchment surface to roofs and increases residents’ awareness that water cellars can only be heritage if they are in use. By defining the long-term sustainability of a water cellar, this study shows how a quantitative approach focusing on heritage users can offer important insights into a constructive evolution rather than a destructive reconstruction under the influence of modernization. Finally, this study provides planners and water resource managers with effective, sustainable management practices for water cellars as well as similar systems in a historical context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Drinking Water Resources Management)
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