Special Issue "Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Orna Braun-Lewensohn
Website
Guest Editor
Conflict Management & Resolution Program, Department of multidisciplinary studies, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel
Interests: salutogenesis; coping; stress; appraisal; conflicts; ethnic minorities; cultural groups; communities
Prof. Dr. Claude-Helene Mayer
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Industrial and Organisational Psychology, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Interests: salutogenesis and transculturality; conflict management and mediation; women in leadership; spirituality, psychobiography, shame, Fourth Industrial Revolution

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

The objective of this Special Issue is to explore the concepts of stress and coping resources and strategies, which are rooted in several theories, such as the stress and coping theory of Lazarus and Folkman and the salutogenesis theory of Antonovsky, and to understand how their core constructs are manifested in various ethnic and cultural groups around the world. These theories suggest that their main concepts, namely, several ways of coping, hope, personal and collective sense of coherence, and others, are universal and, therefore, predict that, in all cultures, they could be considered as potential protectors against stress. However, to date, most research on this topic has been done with western participants, and studies with non-western population have revealed ambiguous results.

Thus, in this Special Issue we aim to address these concerns comprehensively by inviting researchers from around the world to present their studies based on special research methods and mixed research methods. Furthermore, we invite researchers to combine and incorporate several theoretical foundations which are relevant to this topic, such as stress, appraisal and coping, salutogenesis, acculturation, etc. Each theoretical foundation will contribute its own driven variables to create a model encompassing the socio-ecological surroundings of individuals and will enable a fundamental understanding of positive adaptation in stressful and in conflictual situations in various cultural and ethnic groups and contexts around the world.

Prof. Orna Braun-Lewensohn
Prof. Dr. Claude-Helene Mayer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • salutogenesis
  • sense of coherence
  • coping strategies and resources
  • stress
  • appraisal
  • conflicts
  • ethnicity
  • culture

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflict
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6667; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186667 - 13 Sep 2020
Abstract
This Special Issue aims to explore the concepts of stress, coping resources, and coping strategies, which are rooted in several theories, such as the stress and coping theory and the salutogenesis theory, and to understand how their core constructs are manifested in various [...] Read more.
This Special Issue aims to explore the concepts of stress, coping resources, and coping strategies, which are rooted in several theories, such as the stress and coping theory and the salutogenesis theory, and to understand how their core constructs are manifested in various ethnic and cultural groups around the world. This Special Issue includes 13 articles on salutogenesis and coping from different disciplinary, socio-cultural, historical, political, and economic perspectives. These articles address salutogenesis on the individual, organizational, and societal levels. The empirical studies are based in different societal and national contexts and refer to different ethnic groups within those contexts. Other studies examine international leaders in industry from a global perspective and present a systemic review of the literature concerning individuals in specific professions, such as nursing. The studies in the current Special Issue set the ground for continuing research toward even more comprehensive theoretical grounds; studies that incorporate several theoretical backgrounds and explore a broad theoretical model that may help us to understand successful adaptation in various contexts. In summary, results of studies that incorporate these theories may promote our understanding of the effects of coping resources and strategies, including acculturation strategies used among minority groups for positive adaptation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Listening to Hospital Personnel’s Narratives during the COVID-19 Outbreak
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6413; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176413 - 03 Sep 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Healthcare workers (HCWs) facing the COVID-19 pandemic are required to deal with unexpectedly traumatic situations, concern about contamination, and mounting patient deaths. As a means to address the changing needs of our hospital’s HCWs, we conducted a narrative analysis study in the early [...] Read more.
Healthcare workers (HCWs) facing the COVID-19 pandemic are required to deal with unexpectedly traumatic situations, concern about contamination, and mounting patient deaths. As a means to address the changing needs of our hospital’s HCWs, we conducted a narrative analysis study in the early stages of the covid-19 outbreak. A focus group of medical experts, conducted as the initial step, recommended that a bottom-up research tool be used for exploring HCWs’ traumatic experiences and needs. We therefore conducted 450 semi-structured in-depth interviews with hospital personnel. The interviews were based on Maslow’s Pyramid of Needs model, and the narratives were analyzed by applying the Listening Guide methodology. The interviewees expressed a need for physical and psychological security in the battle against Covid-19, in addition to the need for attachment and meaning. Importantly, we also found that the interview itself may serve as a therapeutic tool. In light of our findings, we recommended changes in hospital practices, which were subsequently implemented. Further research on HCWs’ traumatic experiences and needs will provide evidence-based knowledge and may enable novel approaches in the battle against Covid-19. To conclude, the knowledge generated by listening to HCWs’ narratives may provide suitable support programs for professionals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
Open AccessArticle
Coping Dynamics of Consulting Psychology Doctoral Students Transitioning a Professional Role Identity: A Systems Psychodynamic Perspective
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5492; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155492 - 30 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
To remain relevant and valuable, the psychology profession in South Africa continues to transform and evolve in response to the changing needs of society. Some psychologists embark on development opportunities to advance their professional qualifications and skills. In doing so, they experience identity [...] Read more.
To remain relevant and valuable, the psychology profession in South Africa continues to transform and evolve in response to the changing needs of society. Some psychologists embark on development opportunities to advance their professional qualifications and skills. In doing so, they experience identity tensions inherent to professional identity development and transformation. Understanding how psychologists cope with professional identity transition will enable them to develop a self-efficacious service offering and broaden the reach of psychology in the South African context. The aim of this study was to explore the identity work of a group of eight consulting psychology doctoral students to develop a system psychodynamic understanding of their coping dynamics while transitioning to a professional role identity. Students’ self-reflective essays about becoming a consulting psychologist constituted the data protocols for the study and were analysed through hermeneutic phenomenological analysis. Findings describe how students cope with performance and survival anxieties through anti-task behaviour and immature as well as sophisticated psychodynamic defences. The study contributes to the exploration of the coping concept and its manifestation, by proposing defensive coping as a natural dynamic phenomenon in the process of adapting to a transforming professional identity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
Open AccessArticle
Acculturative Stress among Arab Students in Israel: The Roles of Sense of Coherence and Coping Strategies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5106; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145106 - 15 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Background: In Israeli colleges and universities, many Arab students experience acculturative stress. Such stress arises from the need to learn new cultural rules, manage the overarching conflict inherent in maintaining elements of their culture of origin (i.e., Arab culture) while incorporating elements of [...] Read more.
Background: In Israeli colleges and universities, many Arab students experience acculturative stress. Such stress arises from the need to learn new cultural rules, manage the overarching conflict inherent in maintaining elements of their culture of origin (i.e., Arab culture) while incorporating elements of the host culture (i.e., Jewish academic culture), and deal with experiences of prejudice and discrimination present in the host culture. Methods: This study investigated the association between acculturative stress and depressive symptoms among 170 Arab undergraduates from northern and central Israel. It also explored the roles of sense of coherence and coping strategies in the relationship between acculturative stress and depressive symptoms. Participants completed questionnaires on acculturative stress, depressive symptoms, sense of coherence, coping strategies, and demographics. Results: The findings reveal gender differences in the use of different coping strategies and in levels of depressive symptoms. However, academic-year differences were found only in levels of sense of coherence and depressive symptoms. Specifically, female students expressed higher levels of both active and avoidant coping. Moreover, female students and those in their first and second years of university studies reported higher levels of depressive symptoms. Among the male students, acculturative stress was related to depressive symptoms indirectly via sense of coherence and active coping. In contrast, among the female students, acculturative stress was related to depressive symptoms both directly and indirectly via sense of coherence and avoidant coping. Among first- and second-year students, acculturative stress was related to depressive symptoms indirectly via sense of coherence and avoidant coping. However, among third- and fourth-year students, acculturative stress was related to depressive symptoms both directly and indirectly via sense of coherence. Conclusions: This article underscores the significance of gender and academic-year differences in pathways involving acculturative stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Sense of Coherence, Burnout, and Work Engagement: The Moderating Effect of Coping in the Democratic Republic of Congo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 4127; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17114127 - 10 Jun 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Research on coping, sense of coherence, burnout, and work engagement is well documented in western countries. However, a void of studies exists on how coping mechanisms can moderate the relationship among sense of coherence, burnout, and work engagement in a manufacturing company in [...] Read more.
Research on coping, sense of coherence, burnout, and work engagement is well documented in western countries. However, a void of studies exists on how coping mechanisms can moderate the relationship among sense of coherence, burnout, and work engagement in a manufacturing company in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The objective of this research was to examine the moderating effect of coping (COP) in the relationship between sense of coherence (SOC), burnout (BO), and work engagement (WE). The study employed a quantitative research approach, while participants were recruited through convenience sampling. A total of 197 employees (n = 197; females 40%) who are permanently employed in a manufacturing organisation in the DRC participated in the study voluntarily. The results indicate that coping related positively to a sense of coherence. Moreover, the results indicate that sense of coherence and work engagement related negatively to burnout. Furthermore, the results show that coping acted as a moderator in the relationships between variables. The study adds value to the WE theory by suggesting that an employee who has a high level of COP, high SOC, low level of BO, will positively engage, perform, and be productive. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
The Contribution of Long-Term Mindfulness Training on Personal and Professional Coping for Teachers Living in a Conflict Zone: A Qualitative Perspective
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 4096; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17114096 - 08 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
It has been suggested that mindfulness training can provide teachers with coping mechanisms and influence their perceptions of self and others. However, how does mindfulness help teachers cope in a stressful security situation both as Israeli citizens who live in a war zone [...] Read more.
It has been suggested that mindfulness training can provide teachers with coping mechanisms and influence their perceptions of self and others. However, how does mindfulness help teachers cope in a stressful security situation both as Israeli citizens who live in a war zone and as teachers who are responsible for their students’ lives? Fifteen female teachers, who lived and worked in the western Negev and who had completed two-years of mindfulness training, were interviewed. Interviewees reported that their coping skills had been heightened as result of being able to put aside intrusive thoughts and feelings that used to paralyze them and to focus on active coping, centered on what they needed to do promptly. Most also noted a more accepting attitude of themselves, without self-criticism or blame for what they should have or should not have done when facing the stressful situation. In relation to their students, they were more accepting of the behaviors and emotions expressed by their students and reported being more compassionate. The results will be discussed through the prism proposed by Lazarus and Folkman (1991). Educational implications of the outcomes of mindfulness training for those living in areas under the shadow of war will be suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
Open AccessArticle
Health Assets, Vocation and Zest for Healthcare Work. A Salutogenic Approach to Active Coping among Certified Nursing Assistant Students
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3586; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103586 - 20 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
People’s health assets (HA) mapping process and design dynamization strategies for it are paramount issues for health promotion. These strategies improve the health heritage of individuals and communities as both the salutogenic model of health (SMH) and health assets model (HAM) defend. Connecting [...] Read more.
People’s health assets (HA) mapping process and design dynamization strategies for it are paramount issues for health promotion. These strategies improve the health heritage of individuals and communities as both the salutogenic model of health (SMH) and health assets model (HAM) defend. Connecting and mobilizing HA and strengthens the ‘sense of coherence’ (SOC) are both related to enhancing stress active and effective coping strategies. This study aims to describe the HA present in a population of certified nursing assistant students (n = 921) in Spain and then to explore their relationships with the SOC, the motivation to choose healthcare studies and their academic performance. A great variety of HA were identified and mapped. Findings showed that individuals with greater motivation towards self-care and ‘caring for others’ as internal HA, possessed higher SOC levels and a strong vocation for healthcare work. Differences in HA were identified according to gender, age and employment situation. Consistent connections between the care–relation factor and vocational factor with interpersonal and extrapersonal HA were reported. Evidence and results substantiated the salutogenic and asset-based approach as a proper strategy to strengthen SOC, dynamize their HA map, reinforce the sense of calling and enable Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA) students to buffer against caregiving-related stress and thrive in their profession. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Sense of Coherence in Association with Stress Experience and Health in Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3003; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093003 - 26 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study investigated the associations between sex, age, socio-economic status, stress, sense of coherence (SOC), and health (mental wellbeing, depressive symptoms, self-rated health, and subjective health complaints) in Norwegian adolescents aged 13–19 years. Furthermore, the study investigated the potential protective or compensatory role [...] Read more.
This study investigated the associations between sex, age, socio-economic status, stress, sense of coherence (SOC), and health (mental wellbeing, depressive symptoms, self-rated health, and subjective health complaints) in Norwegian adolescents aged 13–19 years. Furthermore, the study investigated the potential protective or compensatory role from SOC on the association between stress and health. Methods: The study was based on a cross-sectional sample of 1233 adolescents. Data were analyzed with descriptive, comparative, and multiple linear regression analyses. Results: Girls reported significantly higher scores on depressive symptoms and subjective health complaints than boys. Stress was significantly and positively associated with depressive symptoms. SOC associated significantly with all outcome variables; and especially with mental wellbeing and depressive symptoms. Significant interaction effects of sex in combination with stress and SOC were found in association with depression and mental wellbeing. Associations were strongest for girls. Conclusion: The findings provided support for the significant role of SOC as a coping resource, especially in relation to adolescents’ mental health; weaker associations were found with subjective health complains and self-rated health. The findings also mainly supported a compensatory role of SOC on the association between stress and health during adolescence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
Open AccessArticle
Psychological Resilience of Volunteers in a South African Health Care Context: A Salutogenic Approach and Hermeneutic Phenomenological Inquiry
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2922; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082922 - 24 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Volunteering in non-Western countries, such as South Africa, is subject to poor infrastructure, lack of resources, poverty-stricken conditions and often conducted by volunteers from lower socio-economic spheres of society. Sustaining the well-being of volunteers in this context is essential in ensuring their continued [...] Read more.
Volunteering in non-Western countries, such as South Africa, is subject to poor infrastructure, lack of resources, poverty-stricken conditions and often conducted by volunteers from lower socio-economic spheres of society. Sustaining the well-being of volunteers in this context is essential in ensuring their continued capacity to volunteer. To do so, it is important to understand the psychological resilience of these volunteers and the resistance resources they employ to positively adapt to their challenging work-life circumstances. The aim of this qualitative hermeneutic phenomenological study was to explore volunteers’ psychological resilience from a salutogenic perspective. In-depth interviews were conducted with eight volunteers servicing government-run hospitals. Data were analysed through phenomenological hermeneutical analysis. Findings show a characteristic work-life orientation to be at the root of volunteers’ resilience. Their work-life orientation is based on a distinct inner drive, an other-directedness and a “calling” work orientation. It is proposed that this work-life orientation enables volunteers in this study context, to cope with and positively adapt to challenging work-life circumstances and continue volunteering. The elements of their work-life orientation are presented as intrapersonal strength resources fundamental to their psychological resilience. It is suggested that organisations invest in developmental interventions that endorse and promote these intrapersonal strengths. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
Open AccessArticle
Sense of Coherence, Compassionate Love and Coping in International Leaders during the Transition into the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2829; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082829 - 20 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Contemporary workplaces are influenced by rapid changes, high levels of competition, increasing complexities and internationalisation processes. At the edge of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR), insecurities and anxieties are high, and leaders are encouraged more than ever to lead employees with meaningful vision [...] Read more.
Contemporary workplaces are influenced by rapid changes, high levels of competition, increasing complexities and internationalisation processes. At the edge of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR), insecurities and anxieties are high, and leaders are encouraged more than ever to lead employees with meaningful vision and prudence in order to make use of employees’ strengths, and ensure mental health and well-being. The aim of this article is to present new insights into salutogenesis, particularly sense of coherence (SOC), compassionate love (CL), and coping (C) in leaders with different cultural backgrounds. This study strengthens the idea that CL is a coping mechanism. This coping mechanism can be used by leaders to establish a resilient and salutogenic organisations. This article explores the subjective perspectives of 22 international leaders from five different countries and their views regarding SOC, CL and C through a qualitative research approach, using a qualitative online questionnaire for data collection and content analysis for data analysis. The findings on the perspectives of leaders provide new and original insights into how SOC, CL and C are connected, and how these concepts contribute to healthy organisations which are on their way to the transition into the 4IR. Conclusions are drawn. Recommendations for future research and practice are given. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
Open AccessArticle
“Enclave in Transition”: Ways of Coping of Academics from Ultra-Orthodox (Haredim) Minority Group with Challenges of Integration into the Workforce
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2373; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072373 - 31 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Traditional societies around the world face various challenges with the introduction of “modern” values as a result of various globalization processes occurring worldwide. In the research literature, these groups are generally referred to as a “transitional societies.” The focus of the research discourse [...] Read more.
Traditional societies around the world face various challenges with the introduction of “modern” values as a result of various globalization processes occurring worldwide. In the research literature, these groups are generally referred to as a “transitional societies.” The focus of the research discourse on “a society in transition” is the social change derived from the undermining of that traditional society and the weakening of its constituent values with the acquisition of higher education and modification of traditional division of roles in the family. In the last two decades, the ultra-Orthodox society in Israel has undergone far-reaching changes that are reflected in the acquisition of higher education and the accelerated entry into the employment market. In light of these changes, this study seeks to examine how the academic ultra-Orthodox deal with this integration into a work place outside the “enclave.” Methodologically, the study is based on qualitative content analysis of four focus groups, two for men and two for women, as is customary in ultra-Orthodox society. During the group discussion, participants were asked to describe how they cope with conflicts and their general professional challenges in the workplace. The findings of the study show that both the men and the women, described themselves as adaptable and coped well, despite the social difficulties facing their community and professional challenges in the employment space. The analysis of the major themes relies on the Stress and Coping theories. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
Open AccessArticle
CB-Art Interventions Implemented with Mental Health Professionals Working in a Shared War Reality: Transforming Negative Images and Enhancing Coping Resources
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2287; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072287 - 28 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Research on mental health professionals (MHPs) exposed to a shared war reality indicates that they are subject to emotional distress, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, and vicarious trauma. This article focuses on a CB-ART (cognitive behavioral and art-based) intervention implemented during the 2014 [...] Read more.
Research on mental health professionals (MHPs) exposed to a shared war reality indicates that they are subject to emotional distress, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, and vicarious trauma. This article focuses on a CB-ART (cognitive behavioral and art-based) intervention implemented during the 2014 Gaza conflict with 51 MHPs who shared war-related experiences with their clients. The intervention included drawing pictures related to three topics: (1) war-related stressors, (2) coping resources, and (3) integration of the stressful image and the resources drawing. The major aims of the study were (1) to examine whether significant changes occurred in MHP distress levels after the intervention; (2) to explore the narratives of the three drawing and their compositional characteristics; and (3) to determine which of selected formats of the integrated drawing and compositional transformations of the stressful image are associated with greater distress reduction. Results indicate that MHP distress levels significantly decreased after the intervention. This stress-reducing effect was also reflected in differences between the compositional elements of the ‘stress drawing’ and the ‘integrated drawing,’ which includes elements of resources. Reduced distress accompanied compositional transformations of the stressful image. MHPs can further use the easily implemented intervention described here as a coping tool in other stressful situations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
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Open AccessArticle
Women in Refugee Camps: Which Coping Resources Help Them to Adapt?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3990; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203990 - 18 Oct 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The present study aimed to explore the coping resources and mental health of women who have fled Syria to a neighboring European country. To that end, we examined the roles of sociodemographic factors, situational factors, and personal and community sense of coherence (SOC [...] Read more.
The present study aimed to explore the coping resources and mental health of women who have fled Syria to a neighboring European country. To that end, we examined the roles of sociodemographic factors, situational factors, and personal and community sense of coherence (SOC and ComSOC, respectively) in mental-health outcomes. One hundred and eleven refugee women aged 19–70 filled out self-reported questionnaires during August 2018 in a refugee camp in Greece. The questionnaires asked the participants for demographic information (i.e., age, level of education level, and time spent in the camp) and also addressed the situational factors of having received aid from various organizations, appraisal of danger during the war in Syria, and exposure to war experiences, as well as the coping resources of SOC and ComSOC. The results show that time spent in the camp, appraisal of danger, SOC, and ComSOC all play significant roles in predicting the variance of various mental-health outcomes. Together, those factors predict 56% of anxiety, 53% of depression, and 58% of somatization. SOC was also found to mediate the relationships between time spent in the camp and outcome variables, as well as the relationships between the appraisal of danger and the outcome variables. This indicates that SOC is crucial for good adaptation. These results will be discussed in light of the salutogenic theory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Sense of Coherence in Nurses: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 1861; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061861 - 13 Mar 2020
Cited by 4
Abstract
Background: Nurses experience high levels of distress due to the nature of their work and workplaces; Antonovsky’s salutogenic theory shows that individual and work-related factors can influence human health. The aim of this paper is to analyze the possible correlations with different [...] Read more.
Background: Nurses experience high levels of distress due to the nature of their work and workplaces; Antonovsky’s salutogenic theory shows that individual and work-related factors can influence human health. The aim of this paper is to analyze the possible correlations with different work-related and individual variables, which influence or are influenced by Sense of Coherence (SOC) and verify the possible use of SOC scales to prevent negative health determinants in workplaces. Methods: Electronic databases were searched with selected studies compared for sample, sample size, study design and basic results. Cross-sectional studies were reviewed for correlations between individual physical and mental health, distress, burnout, job satisfaction and SOC, with intervention studies used to assess the possible impact of training on nurses’ SOC. Results: The review found several correlations between SOC and different work-related variables; but also with several individual characteristics. Conclusion: The review found that SOC was predictor of depressive state, burnout, job dissatisfaction among female nurses; therefore, SOC could be a health promoting resource. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salutogenesis and Coping: Ways to Overcome Stress and Conflicts)
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