Special Issue "Pollution Remediation and Management"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Shahabaldin Rezania
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environment and Energy, Sejong University, Seoul, South Korea
Interests: Wastewater Treatment; Biotechnology, Fermentation; Biofuel and Bio energies; Plant sciences; Waste management
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental pollution has adversely affected the natural ecosystem, and subsequently human health, because of the presence of hazardous materials like organic pollutants and heavy metals. Furthermore, another issue is the accumulation of non-degradable hazardous materials in our environment. Therefore, there is a need to remove these materials from the environment, such as from soil and water.

Overall, "remediation" means to solve environmental problems using a wide range of methods. Remediation technologies are too numerous and generally can be categorized into ex-situ and in-situ methods. Various mechanisms have been developed for the remediation or partial removal of these hazardous compounds, which are described as bio-remediation (using biological organisms to remove contaminated soil or water, like bio-augmentation, with the addition of bacterial cultures to speed up the rate of degradation of a contaminant), phytoremediation (use of free-floating, submerged, or emergent plants to uptake contaminants in their tissues), and bio-sorbent materials, which originated either from natural sources such as waste shell, or are commercially-based like activated carbon.      

This Special Issue welcomes papers that examine recent experimental, computational, and theoretical research of contaminants remediation technologies using natural, constructed, or modified systems. We aim to publish a comprehensive collection of papers that describe the fate and transport of different types of contaminants after remediation, using empirical or statistical models. Submissions that include the remediation of contaminants using various methods are encouraged. The main topics for the Special Issue are presented below:

  • Source and fate of contaminants in soil and water;
  • Innovative remediation technologies for soil and water remediation;
  • Remediation of contaminated sites with heavy metal and other contaminants like poly-aromatic hydrocarbons;
  • Microplastic and persistent organic pollutants fate and remediation;
  • Site, field, and lab scale remediation experiments;
  • Public health aspects of contamination existence in the environment;
  • Health policy related to the persistency of specific contaminants in the environment and their remediation.

Dr. Shahabaldin Rezania
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Remediation technologies
  • Contaminated soil, surface and, subsurface water
  • Organic and inorganic pollutants
  • Bioremediation, phyto-remediation and, nano-remediation
  • Transport and fate of pollutants in the environment
  • Sustainable management of the environment
  • Process modification for pollution prevention

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Sugarcane Bagasse as an Efficient Biosorbent for Methylene Blue Removal: Kinetics, Isotherms and Thermodynamics
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 526; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020526 - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
Adsorption in biomass has proven to be a cost-effective option for treatment of wastewater containing dyes and other pollutants, as it is a simple and low cost technique and does not require high initial investments. The present work aimed to study the adsorption [...] Read more.
Adsorption in biomass has proven to be a cost-effective option for treatment of wastewater containing dyes and other pollutants, as it is a simple and low cost technique and does not require high initial investments. The present work aimed to study the adsorption of methylene blue dye (MB) using sugarcane bagasse (SCB). The biomass was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Adsorption studies were conducted batchwise. Kinetics, adsorption isotherms, and thermodynamics were studied. The results showed that SCB presented a maximum adsorption capacity of 9.41 mg g−1 at 45 °C after 24 h of contact time. Adsorption kinetics data better fitted the pseudo-second order model, indicating a chemical process was involved. The Sips’s three-parameter isotherm model was better for adjusting the data obtained for the adsorption isotherms, indicating a heterogeneous adsorption process. The process showed to be endothermic, spontaneous, and feasible. Therefore, it was concluded that SCB presented as a potential biosorbent material for the treatment of MB-contaminated waters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Remediation and Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Oxidation of Flame Retardant Tetrabromobisphenol A by a Biocatalytic Nanofiber of Chloroperoxidase
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 4917; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244917 - 05 Dec 2019
Abstract
Background: Tetrabromobisphenol (TBBPA), a flame retardant compound, is considered a ubiquitous pollutant, with potential impact on the environment and human health. Several technologies have been applied to accelerate its degradation and minimize environmental impacts. Due to its aromaticity character, peroxidase enzymes may be [...] Read more.
Background: Tetrabromobisphenol (TBBPA), a flame retardant compound, is considered a ubiquitous pollutant, with potential impact on the environment and human health. Several technologies have been applied to accelerate its degradation and minimize environmental impacts. Due to its aromaticity character, peroxidase enzymes may be employed to carry out its transformation in mild conditions. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to determine the capacity of the enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO) to oxidize TBBPA in several water samples. Methods: The oxidation capacity of CPO was evaluated in catalytic conditions using water samples from surface and groundwater, as well as effluents from wastewater treatment plants. The biocatalytic performance of CPO was improved due to its immobilization on nanofibers composed of polyvinyl alcohol and chitosan (PVA/chitosan). Results: Free and immobilized CPO were able to transform more than 80% in short reaction times (60 min); producing more biodegradable and less toxic products. Particularly, the immobilized enzyme was catalytically active in a wider range of pH than the free enzyme with the possibility of reusing it up to five times. Conclusions: The biocatalytic oxidation of TBBPA under environmental conditions is highly efficient, even in complex media such as treated effluents of wastewater treatment plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Remediation and Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimizing the Management of Cadmium Bioremediation Capacity of Metal-Resistant Pseudomonas sp. Strain Al-Dhabi-126 Isolated from the Industrial City of Saudi Arabian Environment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4788; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234788 - 29 Nov 2019
Abstract
In this study, 23 bacterial strains were isolated from a Cadmium (Cd) contaminated soil in the industrial city, Riyadh of Saudi Arabia. Among these isolates six strains were found to withstand cadmium contamination and grow well. From the six isolates Pseudomonas sp. strain [...] Read more.
In this study, 23 bacterial strains were isolated from a Cadmium (Cd) contaminated soil in the industrial city, Riyadh of Saudi Arabia. Among these isolates six strains were found to withstand cadmium contamination and grow well. From the six isolates Pseudomonas sp. strain Al-Dhabi-122–127 were found to resist cadmium toxicity to a higher level. The isolates were subjected to biochemical and 16S rDNA gene sequence characterization to confirm their identification. The bacterial strain Al-Dhabi-124 showed 1.5 times higher Cd-degrading activity than Al-Dhabi-122 and Al-Dhabi-123, and Al-Dhabi-126 exhibited 3.5 times higher Cd-degrading activity, higher than the other strains. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer study showed that the strain Al-Dhabi-126 absorbed Cd, and that the bacterial strain Al-Dhabi-126 was found to tolerate cadmium level up to 2100 µg/mL. The bacterial strain Al-Dhabi-126 showed a maximum Cd removal efficacy at pH between 6.0 and 8.0. The efficacy decreased sharply after an increase in pH (9.0). An optimum temperature of 50 °C and pH 6.0 were found to be effective for the Cd removal process by the isolate. The study indicated that the bacterial strain Al-Dhabi-126 can be used effectively for the bioremediation of heavy metals like cadmium, a major toxic pollutant in industrial effluents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Remediation and Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Oxidative Degradation of Methylene Blue via PDS-Based Advanced Oxidation Process Using Natural Pyrite
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4773; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234773 - 28 Nov 2019
Abstract
H2O2- and PDS-based reactions are two typical advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In this paper, a comparative study of H2O2/PDS-based AOPs employing natural pyrite as a catalyst to degrade methylene blue (MB) was reported. The adaptive [...] Read more.
H2O2- and PDS-based reactions are two typical advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In this paper, a comparative study of H2O2/PDS-based AOPs employing natural pyrite as a catalyst to degrade methylene blue (MB) was reported. The adaptive pH range in pyrite/PDS extended from 3 to 11, in contrast to the narrow effective pH range of 3–7 in pyrite/H2O2. As a result of the iron leaching, a synergistic effect of both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis was observed in pyrite/PDS, whereas heterogeneous catalytic oxidation dominated pyrite/H2O2. Furthermore, the batch results showed that the MB removal by pyrite/PDS was highly dependent on chemical conditions (e.g., pH, pyrite and PDS concentration, temperature). Powerful SO4•− was generated by pyrite rapidly under acidic or weakly acidic conditions, while SO4•− and PDS were assumed by OH under alkaline condition. The lower pyrite loading (from 0.1 to 0.5 g/L) was affected the removal efficiency obviously, while the scavenging of SO4•− did not seem to be remarkable with the excessive amounts of pyrite (>0.5 g/L). Excessive amounts of PDS (>2 mmol/L) might negatively affect the pyrite/PDS system. The reaction temperature that increased from 20 to 40 °C had a positive effect on the degradation of MB. SEM and XRD showed that the passivation of catalyst did not occur due to the strong acid-production ability of pyrite/PDS, inhibiting the formation of Fe-oxide covering the pyrite surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Remediation and Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Non-Carcinogenic Health Risk Assessment due to Fluoride Exposure from Tea Consumption in Iran Using Monte Carlo Simulation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4261; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214261 - 02 Nov 2019
Abstract
Excessive intake of fluoride can cause adverse health effects. Consumption of tea as a popular drink could be a potential source of fluoride exposure to humans. This research aimed to evaluate the fluoride concentration in tea among the Iranian people using the available [...] Read more.
Excessive intake of fluoride can cause adverse health effects. Consumption of tea as a popular drink could be a potential source of fluoride exposure to humans. This research aimed to evaluate the fluoride concentration in tea among the Iranian people using the available data in the literature and to assess the health risk related to the consumption of tea in men, women, and children. The health risk assessment was conducted using the chronic daily intake and hazard quotient according to the approach suggested by the Environmental Protection Agency. The fluoride content in published studies varied noticeably, ranging from 0.13 to 3.27 mg/L. The results revealed that the hazard quotient (HQ) in age groups of women (21–72 years) and children (0–11 years) was within the safe zone (HQ < 1) which showed that there was no potential of non-carcinogenic risk associated with drinking tea in these groups. However, in one case of the men (21–72 years), the HQ > 1 which shows a probable risk of fluorosis. The order of non-carcinogenic health risks in the studied groups was in the order of men > women > children. The results of this can be useful for organizations with the responsibility of human health promotion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Remediation and Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Current Status, Challenges, and Policy Recommendations of China’s Marine Monitoring Systems for Coastal Persistent Organic Pollution Based on Experts’ Questionnaire Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3083; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173083 - 25 Aug 2019
Abstract
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) monitoring and management in typical semi-enclosed bays is a major global environmental issue. This study concentrated on a questionnaire survey and analysis of marine environmental management and monitoring departments at all levels in China, and proposed suggestions on the [...] Read more.
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) monitoring and management in typical semi-enclosed bays is a major global environmental issue. This study concentrated on a questionnaire survey and analysis of marine environmental management and monitoring departments at all levels in China, and proposed suggestions on the construction and improvement of POPs monitoring and management system. Results show that POPs are initially involved in China’s current marine environmental monitoring system, and the monitoring strength and capability still need to be continuously improved, mainly in the recognition, funding input, relevant standards, monitoring, and evaluation technical regulations of marine environmental POPs monitoring. Therefore, in order to gradually improve the monitoring and management system of China’s offshore marine environment POPs, this study suggests starting from four directions: (1) Building POPs monitoring system of a marine ecological environment, and strengthening POPs monitoring in different environmental media; (2) strengthening land-based POPs emission and the related human activities’ intensity survey, and establishing a POPs information sharing database; (3) optimizing POPs monitoring technology in the marine environment, and improving POPs supervision and management technical support system; and (4) participating in regional and international marine environment POPs monitoring and evaluation projects, and strengthening the construction of talent teams. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Remediation and Management)
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