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Potential for Mycorrhizae-Assisted Phytoremediation of Phosphorus for Improved Water Quality

Plant and Soil Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010007
Received: 24 September 2020 / Revised: 9 December 2020 / Accepted: 14 December 2020 / Published: 22 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Remediation and Management)
During this 6th Great Extinction, freshwater quality is imperiled by upland terrestrial practices. Phosphorus, a macronutrient critical for life, can be a concerning contaminant when excessively present in waterways due to its stimulation of algal and cyanobacterial blooms, with consequences for ecosystem functioning, water use, and human and animal health. Landscape patterns from residential, industrial and agricultural practices release phosphorus at alarming rates and concentrations threaten watershed communities. In an effort to reconcile the anthropogenic effects of phosphorus pollution, several strategies are available to land managers. These include source reduction, contamination event prevention and interception. A total of 80% of terrestrial plants host mycorrhizae which facilitate increased phosphorus uptake and thus removal from soil and water. This symbiotic relationship between fungi and plants facilitates a several-fold increase in phosphorus uptake. It is surprising how little this relationship has been encouraged to mitigate phosphorus for water quality improvement. This paper explores how facilitating this symbiosis in different landscape and land-use contexts can help reduce the application of fertility amendments, prevent non-point source leaching and erosion, and intercept remineralized phosphorus before it enters surface water ecosystems. This literature survey offers promising insights into how mycorrhizae can aid ecological restoration to reconcile humans’ damage to Earth’s freshwater. We also identify areas where research is needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: mycorrhizae; phosphorus; water quality; mycoremediation; phytoremediation; ecological restoration; ecological reconciliation; myco-phytoremediation; symbiosis mycorrhizae; phosphorus; water quality; mycoremediation; phytoremediation; ecological restoration; ecological reconciliation; myco-phytoremediation; symbiosis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rubin, J.A.; Görres, J.H. Potential for Mycorrhizae-Assisted Phytoremediation of Phosphorus for Improved Water Quality. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010007

AMA Style

Rubin JA, Görres JH. Potential for Mycorrhizae-Assisted Phytoremediation of Phosphorus for Improved Water Quality. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(1):7. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010007

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rubin, Jessica A.; Görres, Josef H. 2021. "Potential for Mycorrhizae-Assisted Phytoremediation of Phosphorus for Improved Water Quality" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 1: 7. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010007

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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