Special Issue "Regulation of Muscle Mass, Exercise, Metabolism"

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Joseph Marino
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Kinesiology, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223, USA
Interests: obesity; diabetes; exercise

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce that a Special Issue on The Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Mass and Metabolism in Health and Disease is being organized by the Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Skeletal muscle has the remarkable ability to adapt to an array of stressors that result in altered structure, function, and metabolism. When such adaptations occur in response to exercise and other healthy lifestyle habits, these adaptations are favorable and enhance quality of life. However, skeletal muscle structure, function, and metabolism may also be altered directly in response to certain disease states, or indirectly as a result of disease treatment. Oftentimes, this results in loss of skeletal muscle mass, poor metabolic control, and reduced quality of life. Developing strategies to improve skeletal muscle health during disease will improve patient outcomes and reduce the health care burden. The keywords below provide some of the areas of interest.

Dr. Joseph Marino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Cachexia
  • Sarcopenia
  • Exercise
  • Metabolic disease
  • Muscle hypertrophy
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Epigenetics
  • Epidemiology
  • Disease prevention
  • Disuse/Bed rest
  • Corticosteroid treatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Effects of Exogenous Lactate Administration on the IGF1/Akt/mTOR Pathway in Rat Skeletal Muscle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7805; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217805 - 25 Oct 2020
Abstract
We investigated the effects of oral lactate administration on protein synthesis and degradation factors in rats over 2 h after intake. Seven-week-old male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8/group); their blood plasma levels of lactate, glucose, insulin, [...] Read more.
We investigated the effects of oral lactate administration on protein synthesis and degradation factors in rats over 2 h after intake. Seven-week-old male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8/group); their blood plasma levels of lactate, glucose, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) were examined following sacrifice at 0, 30, 60, or 120 min after sodium lactate (2 g/kg) administration. We measured the mRNA expression levels of protein synthesis-related genes (IGF receptor, protein kinase B (Akt), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)) or degradation-related genes (muscle RING-finger protein-1 (MuRF1), atrogin-1) and analyzed the protein expression and phosphorylation (activation) of Akt and mTOR. Post-administration, the plasma lactate concentration increased to 3.2 mmol/L after 60 min. Plasma glucose remained unchanged throughout, while insulin and IGF1 levels decreased after 30 min. The mRNA levels of IGF receptor and mTOR peaked after 60 min, and Akt expression was significantly upregulated from 30 to 120 min. However, MuRF1 and atrogin-1 expression levels were unaffected. Akt protein phosphorylation did not change significantly, whereas mTOR phosphorylation significantly increased after 30 min. Thus, lactate administration increased the mRNA and protein expression of protein-synthesis factors, suggesting that it can potentially promote skeletal muscle synthesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Muscle Mass, Exercise, Metabolism)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Chemotherapy Treatment on Muscle Strength, Quality of Life, Fatigue, and Anxiety in Women with Breast Cancer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7289; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197289 - 06 Oct 2020
Abstract
The study aimed to evaluate the effects of chemotherapy treatment on muscle strength, quality of life, fatigue, and anxiety in women with breast cancer. Nineteen women who were undergoing a chemotherapy treatment (breast cancer treatment [BCT] group, 52.2 ± 13.1 years) and 18 [...] Read more.
The study aimed to evaluate the effects of chemotherapy treatment on muscle strength, quality of life, fatigue, and anxiety in women with breast cancer. Nineteen women who were undergoing a chemotherapy treatment (breast cancer treatment [BCT] group, 52.2 ± 13.1 years) and 18 women without cancer (control [CNT] group, 55.8 ± 8.4 years) answered questionnaires for evaluation of fatigue (Fatigue Scale), quality of life (Short-Form Healthy Survey [SF-36] questionnaire), and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory [IDATE]) levels. Muscle strength was also assessed by an isometric grip test and an isokinetic knee extension test. Physical limitations, social and emotional domains of quality of life were lower in the BCT group in comparison to the CNT group (p = 0.002; p = 0.003; p = 0.0003, respectively). The other domains did not differ between groups (p > 0.05). There were no differences in fatigue and anxiety levels between both the BCT and CNT groups (p > 0.05). Additionally, isometric grip strength was higher in the CNT group when compared to the BCT group (p = 0.048). However, there were no differences between the BCT and CNT groups for peak torque and total work at both 60°.s−1 (p = 0.95 and p = 0.61, respectively) and 180°.s−1 (p = 0.94 and p = 0.72, respectively). These results suggest that three cycles of chemotherapy treatment may impair handgrip isometric strength and quality of life in women with breast cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Muscle Mass, Exercise, Metabolism)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
PGC-1α-Targeted Therapeutic Approaches to Enhance Muscle Recovery in Aging
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8650; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228650 - 21 Nov 2020
Abstract
Impaired muscle recovery (size and strength) following a disuse period commonly occurs in older adults. Many of these individuals are not able to adequately exercise due to pain and logistic barriers. Thus, nutritional and pharmacological therapeutics, that are translatable, are needed to promote [...] Read more.
Impaired muscle recovery (size and strength) following a disuse period commonly occurs in older adults. Many of these individuals are not able to adequately exercise due to pain and logistic barriers. Thus, nutritional and pharmacological therapeutics, that are translatable, are needed to promote muscle recovery following disuse in older individuals. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) may be a suitable therapeutic target due to pleiotropic regulation of skeletal muscle. This review focuses on nutritional and pharmacological interventions that target PGC-1α and related Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) signaling in muscle and thus may be rapidly translated to prevent muscle disuse atrophy and promote recovery. In this review, we present several therapeutics that target PGC-1α in skeletal muscle such as leucine, β-hydroxy-β-methylbuyrate (HMB), arginine, resveratrol, metformin and combination therapies that may have future application to conditions of disuse and recovery in humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Muscle Mass, Exercise, Metabolism)
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Open AccessReview
A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Resistance Training on Whole-Body Muscle Growth in Healthy Adult Males
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1285; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041285 - 17 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to study all published clinical trial interventions, determined the magnitude of whole-body hypertrophy in humans (healthy males) and observed the individual responsibility of each variable in muscle growth after resistance training (RT). Searches were conducted in [...] Read more.
We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to study all published clinical trial interventions, determined the magnitude of whole-body hypertrophy in humans (healthy males) and observed the individual responsibility of each variable in muscle growth after resistance training (RT). Searches were conducted in PubMed, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library from database inception until 10 May 2018 for original articles assessing the effects of RT on muscle size after interventions of more than 2 weeks of duration. Specifically, we obtain the variables fat-free mass (FMM), lean muscle mass (LMM) and skeletal muscle mass (SMM). The effects on outcomes were expressed as mean differences (MD) and a random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regressions determined covariates (age, weight, height, durations in weeks…) to explore the moderate effect related to the participants and characteristics of training. One hundred and eleven studies (158 groups, 1927 participants) reported on the effects of RT for muscle mass. RT significantly increased muscle mass (FFM+LMM+SMM; Δ1.53 kg; 95% CI [1.30, 1.76], p < 0.001; I2 = 0%, p = 1.00). Considering the overall effects of the meta-regression, and taking into account the participants’ characteristics, none of the studied covariates explained any effect on changes in muscle mass. Regarding the training characteristics, the only significant variable that explained the variance of the hypertrophy was the sets per workout, showing a significant negative interaction (MD; estimate: 1.85, 95% CI [1.45, 2.25], p < 0.001; moderator: -0.03 95% CI [−0.05, −0.001] p = 0.04). In conclusion, RT has a significant effect on the improvement of hypertrophy (~1.5 kg). The excessive sets per workout affects negatively the muscle mass gain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Muscle Mass, Exercise, Metabolism)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Phytoecdysteroids Attenuate Sarcopenia in Aged Mice

Authors: Marcus M. Lawrence et al.

Affiliation: Appalachian State University, Department of Health and Exercise Science, Boone, NC, USA

 

Title: Therapeutic approaches to enhance muscle recovery in aging

Authors: Jonathan J. Petrocelli et al.

Affiliation: Departments of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, University of Utah, 520 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT, USA

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