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Article

Association of Lumbar Paraspinal Muscle Morphometry with Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

1
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea
2
Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Joseph Marino
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4037; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084037
Received: 5 January 2021 / Revised: 19 March 2021 / Accepted: 30 March 2021 / Published: 12 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Muscle Mass, Exercise, Metabolism)
The objective of this study was to assess the cross-sectional areas (CSA) of lumbar paraspinal muscles and their fatty degeneration in adults with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS) diagnosed with chronic radiculopathy, compare them with those of the same age- and sex-related groups with radiculopathy, and evaluate their correlations and the changes observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study included 62 female patients aged 65–85 years, who were diagnosed with lumbar polyradiculopathy. The patients were divided into two groups: 30 patients with spondylolisthesis and 32 patients without spondylolisthesis. We calculated the CSA and fatty degeneration of the erector spinae (ES) and multifidus (MF) on axial T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images from the inferior end plate of the L4 vertebral body levels. The functional CSA (FCSA): CSA ratio, skeletal muscle index (SMI), and MF CSA: ES CSA ratio were calculated and compared between the two groups using an independent t-test. We performed logistic regression analysis using spondylolisthesis as the dependent variable and SMI, FCSA, rFCSA, fat infiltration rate as independent variables. The result showed more fat infiltration of MF in patients with DLS (56.33 vs. 44.66%; p = 0.001). The mean FCSA (783.33 vs. 666.22 mm2; p = 0.028) of ES muscle was a statistically larger in the patients with DLS. The ES FCSA / total CSA was an independent predictor of lumbar spondylolisthesis (odd ratio =1.092, p = 0.016), while the MF FCSA / total CSA was an independent protective factor (odd ratio =0.898, p = 0.002) View Full-Text
Keywords: degenerative spondylolisthesis; polyradiculopathy; erector spinae; multifidus; paraspinal muscles; fatty degeneration; cross sectional area; lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis; polyradiculopathy; erector spinae; multifidus; paraspinal muscles; fatty degeneration; cross sectional area; lumbar
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lee, E.T.; Lee, S.A.; Soh, Y.; Yoo, M.C.; Lee, J.H.; Chon, J. Association of Lumbar Paraspinal Muscle Morphometry with Degenerative Spondylolisthesis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4037. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084037

AMA Style

Lee ET, Lee SA, Soh Y, Yoo MC, Lee JH, Chon J. Association of Lumbar Paraspinal Muscle Morphometry with Degenerative Spondylolisthesis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(8):4037. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084037

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lee, Eun T., Seung A. Lee, Yunsoo Soh, Myung C. Yoo, Jun H. Lee, and Jinmann Chon. 2021. "Association of Lumbar Paraspinal Muscle Morphometry with Degenerative Spondylolisthesis" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 8: 4037. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084037

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