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Special Issue "Long COVID and Post-COVID-19 Syndromes"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Walter Malorni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Global Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 00168 Rome, Italy
Interests: gender disparity; Long COVID; global health
Dr. Danilo Buonsenso
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Center for Global Health Research and Studies, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 00168 Roma, Italy
2. Department of Woman and Child Health and Public Health, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario "A. Gemelli", 00168 Roma, Italy
Interests: pediatrics; Long COVID; global health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Umberto Moscato
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Center for Global Health Research and Studies, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 00168 Roma, Italy
2. Department of Woman and Child Health and Public Health, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario "A. Gemelli", 00168 Roma, Italy
Interests: occupational and urban health; Long COVID; global health
Dr. Leuconoe Grazia Sisti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Institute of Public Health, Section of Hygiene, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 00168 Rome, Italy
2. National Institute for Health, Migration and Poverty, 00153 Rome, Italy
Interests: global health; Long COVID; health inequalities; mental health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With more than 186 million cases and 4 million deaths worldwide, the coronavirus pandemic has disrupted global healthcare as well as social and economic scenarios. Even if vaccination campaigns are progressing fast, some concerns remain, such as the emerging spread of SARS-CoV-2 variants and the threats they could pose on vaccine effectiveness.

Despite the prolific COVID-19 scientific production of the last year, many aspects of SARS-CoV-2 infection still remain to be explored. In this regard, the persistence of symptoms in COVID-19 symptomatic cases or even the onset of symptoms in asymptomatic COVID-19 cases and the long-term complications beyond 4 weeks or even 8–12 weeks after the coronavirus infection is attracting increasing interest in the scientific community as well as among patients, organizations, and societies.

The chances of having long-term symptoms (e.g., fatigue, respiratory symptoms, “brain fog”, neurological and psychiatric symptoms, autonomic dysfunction such as tachycardia and fever, gastrointestinal discomforts, tinnitus, earaches, changes to sense of smell or taste, rash, and post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC)), a condition generally known as Long COVID or, most properly, post-acute COVID-19 and persistent post-COVID-19 syndrome, do not seem to be related to the intensity of COVID-19 manifestation. 

It has been reported in both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases, in both mild–moderate and severe clinical presentations, in hospitalized as well as in not hospitalized cases, in both adults and children, in which the PIMS-TS (pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2) has been observed in 8% to 50% of cases.

Long COVID that has clearly shown a multi-organ impact that involves body systems including heart, lung, kidney, skin, and brain functions with a broad spectrum of manifestation is currently estimated in 10% up to 30% of cases.

In this regard, literature on epidemiology as well as pathophysiology, treatment proposals, and care models is still scarce. Moreover, it is unavoidable not to pay attention to the quality of life and the lived experiences of Long COVID patients as well as on health professionals’ training needs and the impact of Long COVID on occupational health and society.

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the current state of knowledge on the Long COVID/post-COVID-19 syndrome.

Papers on the epidemiology and etiology—with particular regard to risk and protective factors—as well as physiology and pathophysiology, diagnostic tools, clinical manifestation and organ-specific sequelae, multi-interdisciplinary and integrated care models, and therapeutic and rehabilitation proposals both in primary and in secondary and tertiary care are welcomed. Moreover, contributions on the perception, needs, quality of life, and social protection of long-haulers as well as on the occupational, economic, and social implications of the increasing burden of Long COVID will be highly appreciated.

Qualitative as well as quantitative research papers, reviews, case reports, guidelines, and commentaries will be considered for this Special Issue, but other types of contributions will also be taken into consideration for publication.

We look forward to your participation in this Special Issue to increase and share our Long COVID knowledge, committing, all together, to better meeting our patients’ needs.

Prof. Dr. Walter Malorni
Dr. Danilo Buonsenso
Dr. Leuconoe Grazia Sisti
Prof. Dr. Umberto Moscato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Long COVID/post-COVID-19 syndrome
  • epidemiology
  • pathophysiology
  • clinical practice
  • therapy
  • integrated care models
  • patients’ perception
  • pediatrics
  • mental health
  • occupational, social and economic impact

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
State Health Department Communication about Long COVID in the United States on Facebook: Risks, Prevention, and Support
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 5973; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105973 - 14 May 2022
Viewed by 420
Abstract
Greater public awareness of long COVID severity and susceptibility is needed to support those with long COVID and encourage preventive behaviors. It is not yet known to what extent health departments have informed the public about long COVID risks or offered guidance and [...] Read more.
Greater public awareness of long COVID severity and susceptibility is needed to support those with long COVID and encourage preventive behaviors. It is not yet known to what extent health departments have informed the public about long COVID risks or offered guidance and support for those with long COVID. The objective of this research was to determine how and to what extent US state health departments have communicated with the public about long COVID via Facebook. Facebook posts with COVID-19 and long COVID terms made by 50 US state health departments plus Washington, DC, from 1 January 2020 to 31 January 2022, were collected using CrowdTangle. The first long COVID post appeared on 15 July 2020. From 15 July 2020 to 31 January 2022, state health departments made 49,310 COVID-19 posts and 137 long COVID posts. Using quantitative content analysis methods, long COVID posts were coded for health belief model constructs. Among long COVID posts, 75.18% included language about susceptibility, 64.96% severity, and 64.23% benefits of prevention. Cues to preventive action appeared in 54.01% of posts. 19.71% of posts provided guidance for those with long COVID. While health departments posted extensively about COVID-19, posts about long COVID were rare. This represents a missed opportunity to bolster arguments for preventive behaviors and support those experiencing long COVID. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Long COVID and Post-COVID-19 Syndromes)
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Article
Telemonitoring in Long-COVID Patients—Preliminary Findings
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5268; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095268 - 26 Apr 2022
Viewed by 438
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the high usefulness of telemedicine. To date, no uniform recommendations or diagnostic protocols for long-COVID patients have been developed. This article presents the preliminary results of the examination of patients after SARS-CoV-2 infection who were provided with medical [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the high usefulness of telemedicine. To date, no uniform recommendations or diagnostic protocols for long-COVID patients have been developed. This article presents the preliminary results of the examination of patients after SARS-CoV-2 infection who were provided with medical telemonitoring devices in order to oversee their pulmonological and cardiological health. Three cases have been analyzed. Each patient underwent a 10-day registration of basic vital signs, in three 15-min sessions daily: RR (respiratory rate), ECG (electrocardiogram), HR (pulse), SPO2 (saturation), body temperature and cough. Rule methods and machine learning were employed to automatically detect events. As a result, serious disorders of all the three patients were detected: cardiological and respiratory disorders that required extended diagnostics. Furthermore, average values of the selected parameters (RR, HR, SPO2) were calculated for every patient, including an indication of how often they exceeded the alarm thresholds. In conclusion, monitoring parameters in patients using telemedicine, especially in a time of limited access to the healthcare system, is a valuable clinical instrument. It enables medical professionals to recognize conditions which may endanger a patient’s health or life. Telemedicine provides a reliable assessment of a patient’s health status made over a distance, which can alleviate a patient’s stress caused by long-COVID syndrome. Telemedicine allows identification of disorders and performing further diagnosis, which is possible owing to the implementation of advanced analysis. Telemedicine, however, requires flexibility and the engagement of a multidisciplinary team, who will respond to patients’ problems on an ongoing basis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Long COVID and Post-COVID-19 Syndromes)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Long COVID-19: Clinical Features and Impact on Employment Status
Authors: D. Buonsenso, M.R. Gualano, L.G. Sisti, W. Malorni and U. Moscato 
Affiliation: Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy

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