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Occupational Therapy: Neurorehabilitation of Children and Adults

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2022) | Viewed by 20610

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Center for Advanced University Studies La Salle, Autonomous University of Madrid, 28023 Madrid, Spain
2. Occupational Thinks Research Group, Institute of Neurosciences, Center for Advanced University Studies La Salle, Autonomous University of Madrid, 28023 Madrid, Spain
Interests: neurorehabilitation; somatosensory; stereognosis; stroke; brain injury; cerebral palsy; occupational therapy; upper limb; assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Center for Advanced University Studies La Salle, Autonomous University of Madrid, 28023 Madrid, Spain
2. Occupational Thinks Research Group, Institute of Neurosciences, Center for Advanced University Studies La Salle, Autonomous University of Madrid, 28023 Madrid, Spain
3. Instituto de Rehabilitación Funcional La Salle,Calle Ganímedes, 11, 28023 Madrid, Spain
Interests: neurorehabilitation; occupational therapy; motor imagery; mentral practice; stroke; brain injury; upper limb; hand therapy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a growing body of literature that recognizes the importance of the beneficial effect of occupational therapy. In acute or chronic neurological disease, there is evidence showing that occupational therapy helps to prevent disability, improve functional recovery, promote the development of children with problems, and generate fewer dependency situations.

While the role of occupational therapy has been recognized by the World Health Organization and multiple scientific societies, further scientific dissemination is still necessary. There are unanswered questions on some particular aspects of great relevance for occupational therapy, and addressing these research challenges will improve not only the understanding of the field but also recovery outcomes of patients undergoing neurorehabilitation.

This Special Issue aims to disseminate knowledge about the recent advances in occupational therapy for neurorehabilitation.

We call upon clinicians and researchers to contribute works focused on improving the levels of participation and activity, as well as bodily functions and structures, of people with congenital, acquired, or progressive/degenerative brain damage.

We welcome the submission of original research (experimental or descriptive), validation of evaluation tools, review articles, case series, and case reports.

Prof. Dr. César García
Dr. Miguel Martín-Gómez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • occupational therapy
  • activities of daily living
  • rehabilitation
  • neurologic disorder

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

28 pages, 2831 KiB  
Article
Quo Vadis, Amadeo Hand Robot? A Randomized Study with a Hand Recovery Predictive Model in Subacute Stroke
by Pedro Amalio Serrano-López Terradas, Teresa Criado Ferrer, Iris Jakob and Jose Ignacio Calvo-Arenillas
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 690; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010690 - 30 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2833
Abstract
Background. Early identification of hand-prognosis-factors at patient’s admission could help to select optimal synergistic rehabilitation programs based on conventional (COHT) or robot-assisted (RAT) therapies. Methods. In this bi-phase cross-over prospective study, 58 stroke patients were enrolled in two randomized groups. Both groups received [...] Read more.
Background. Early identification of hand-prognosis-factors at patient’s admission could help to select optimal synergistic rehabilitation programs based on conventional (COHT) or robot-assisted (RAT) therapies. Methods. In this bi-phase cross-over prospective study, 58 stroke patients were enrolled in two randomized groups. Both groups received same treatments A + B (A = 36 COHT sessions for 10 weeks; B = 36 RAT sessions for 10 weeks; 45 min/session; 3 to 5 times per week). Outcome repeated measures by blinded assessors included FMUL, BBT, NHPT, Amadeo Robot (AHR) and AMPS. Statistical comparisons by Pearson’s rank correlations and one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni posthoc tests, with size effects and statistic power, were reported. Multiple backward linear regression models were used to predict the variability of sensorimotor and functional outcomes.Results. Isolated COHT or RAT treatments improved hand function at 3 months. While “higher hand paresis at admission” affected to sensorimotor and functional outcomes, “laterality of injury” did not seem to affect the recovery of the hand. Kinetic-kinematic parameters of robot allowed creating a predictive model of hand recovery at 3 and 6 months from 1st session. Conclusions. Hand impairment is an important factor in define sensorimotor and functional outcomes, but not lesion laterality, to predict hand recovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Therapy: Neurorehabilitation of Children and Adults)
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17 pages, 2157 KiB  
Article
What Competencies Does a Community Occupational Therapist Need in Neurorehabilitation? Qualitative Perspectives
by Daniela Avello-Sáez, Fabiola Helbig-Soto, Nayadet Lucero-González and María del Mar Fernández-Martínez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 6096; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106096 - 17 May 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2697
Abstract
More than three million people in Chile suffer from neurological conditions, and many of these become permanent users of health services with a community approach. In this way, disciplinary competencies in this area are relevant. We seek to characterize the competencies for community [...] Read more.
More than three million people in Chile suffer from neurological conditions, and many of these become permanent users of health services with a community approach. In this way, disciplinary competencies in this area are relevant. We seek to characterize the competencies for community occupational therapy intervention in neurorehabilitation. Using a qualitative approach, interviews were conducted with eighteen professionals and were analyzed using content analysis. The main results are associated with the competencies of knowledge associated with theoretical biomedical and community elements. Skills range from health evaluation and intervention on micro- and macrosocial levels. Attitude is also an important skill, stemming from personal and relational spheres. These findings suggest that interventions are essentially on a personal and microsocial level, focusing first on pathology and treatment, and later comprehending the interactions with a patient’s close social environment, such as family, schoolmates, and workmates and their physical environment at home, school, and the workplace. Although the final objective of community intervention is present in the discourse as being able to generate structural changes that favor well-being and social inclusion, concrete competencies are not appreciated on a macrosocial level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Therapy: Neurorehabilitation of Children and Adults)
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11 pages, 2483 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Task-Oriented Training on Upper-Limb Function, Visual Perception, and Activities of Daily Living in Acute Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study
by Wonho Choi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3186; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063186 - 08 Mar 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 4290
Abstract
This pilot study aimed to investigate the effects of task-oriented training on upper-limb functioning, visual perception, and activities of daily living (ADL) in acute stroke patients. Of 20 participants, 10 were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to experimental and control groups. Task-oriented [...] Read more.
This pilot study aimed to investigate the effects of task-oriented training on upper-limb functioning, visual perception, and activities of daily living (ADL) in acute stroke patients. Of 20 participants, 10 were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to experimental and control groups. Task-oriented training and table-top activity training were implemented for 6 weeks. Change in upper-limb functioning was assessed with the Manual Function Test (MFT); visual perceptual skill and ADL performance were evaluated using the Motor-Free Visual Perception Test—Vertical (MVPT-V) and Korean Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI), respectively. There was a significant interaction in the MFT and MBI score between the group and time (p < 0.05), but the group effect was not significant (p > 0.05). The MFT and MBI score significantly increased in both groups after the intervention (p < 0.001), but the effect size was greater in the task-oriented training group than the table-top activity training group. No significant interaction with MVPT-V score was found between the group and time (p > 0.05), and no statistical group difference was found either (p > 0.05). Both groups showed significant improvement in their MVPT-V score after the intervention (p < 0.001). The pilot study findings demonstrate that both task-oriented training and table-top activity training are effective in recovering upper-limb function, visual perception, and ADL in acute stroke patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Therapy: Neurorehabilitation of Children and Adults)
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10 pages, 496 KiB  
Article
Validation of Spanish Erasmus-Modified Nottingham Sensory Assessment Stereognosis Scale in Acquired Brain Damage
by Belén Dolores Zamarro-Rodríguez, Miguel Gómez-Martínez and César Cuesta-García
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(23), 12564; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312564 - 29 Nov 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2216
Abstract
Acquired brain injury (ABI) is the third leading cause of death in Spain. The disability derived from ABI can include considerable difficulties in upper-limb use due to somatosensory deficits. One of the assessments most commonly used to evaluate ABI is the Nottingham Sensory [...] Read more.
Acquired brain injury (ABI) is the third leading cause of death in Spain. The disability derived from ABI can include considerable difficulties in upper-limb use due to somatosensory deficits. One of the assessments most commonly used to evaluate ABI is the Nottingham Sensory Assessment (NSA); however, there is no complete psychometric analysis or standardized version in Spanish. We aimed to develop and validate a Spanish version of the stereognosis component of the NSA for evaluating Spanish adults with ABI via a single-center, observational, cross-sectional study. The Spanish version of the NSA was developed in two steps. The first was based on the standardization and collection of normative data in 120 asymptomatic participants. For the second, we recruited 25 participants with ABI to establish concurrent criterion-related validity, internal consistency, and floor/ceiling effects. Criterion validity was assessed against two-point discrimination and tactile-localization tests. Our normative data showed significant differences among the various age groups (p < 0.05), supporting the validity of the Spanish-version assessment. For the ABI sample, we also found further evidence of validity with Spearman’s rho coefficient between the total scores and the two-point discrimination and tactile-localization tests, which showed low and moderate correlations (rho = 0.50–0.75, p < 0.05). Internal consistency was excellent, with a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.91. No ceiling or floor effects were found. We conclude that the stereognosis component of the NSA in its Spanish version is a valid scale that can be used to comprehensively and accurately assess stereognosis capacity in adults with ABI. As a low-cost evaluation, this assessment has great potential to be widely used in clinical practice and research settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Therapy: Neurorehabilitation of Children and Adults)
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9 pages, 337 KiB  
Article
Personality Profile in Focal Hand Dystonia: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Marta Pérez-de-Heredia-Torres, Elisabet Huertas-Hoyas, Nuria Trugeda-Pedrajo, Sergio Serrada-Tejeda, Alfonso Gómez-Gil-Díaz-Río and Juan C. Martínez-Castrillo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7863; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157863 - 25 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1664
Abstract
It has been suggested that focal hand dystonia (FHD) should be viewed as a neuropsychiatric disorder rather than as a pure movement disorder. We aimed to compare the personality factors that are common to people with FHD and evaluate how personality factors could [...] Read more.
It has been suggested that focal hand dystonia (FHD) should be viewed as a neuropsychiatric disorder rather than as a pure movement disorder. We aimed to compare the personality factors that are common to people with FHD and evaluate how personality factors could affect the functionality of the upper limbs and community participation. We conducted a cross-sectional case–control study in which 12 people with FHD were matched with 12 age and gender matched healthy control participants. The Big Five Questionnaire; the Quick Disabilities, Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire; and the Jebsen–Taylor Test of Hand Function were used as assessment measures. Control of emotions was the only variable for which a significant difference was found, with participants with FHD displaying lesser control. Correlations were not observed between different personality profiles, the functionality of the upper limbs and the perceived participation of people with FHD in activities of daily living. People with FHD may present with low emotional stability, but this does not have a negative impact on the functionality of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. These findings have clinical implications to be considered for interventions, as they suggest that personality aspects, such as extraversion, may not predict for better functionality and perceived participation in activities of daily living. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Therapy: Neurorehabilitation of Children and Adults)
13 pages, 2281 KiB  
Article
Independence in Daily Activities after Stroke among Occupational Therapy Patients and Its Relationship with Unilateral Neglect
by Iván De-Rosende-Celeiro, Alba Rey-Villamayor, Isabel Francisco-de-Miguel and Adriana Ávila-Álvarez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7537; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147537 - 15 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4413
Abstract
More research is needed to better understand the impact of occupational therapy (OT) in stroke patients and syndromes of unilateral neglect (UN) and anosognosia. A prospective, observational, longitudinal design was conducted on a sample of 27 OT patients. The objectives were to examine: [...] Read more.
More research is needed to better understand the impact of occupational therapy (OT) in stroke patients and syndromes of unilateral neglect (UN) and anosognosia. A prospective, observational, longitudinal design was conducted on a sample of 27 OT patients. The objectives were to examine: (1) the presence of UN and anosognosia; (2) the functional outcomes; and (3) the association of UN at baseline with functional status at discharge from OT. The outcomes were Barthel (functional independence) and the Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI). The baseline proportion of participants with UN was 33% according to the Star Cancellation Test (STC), and 48.1% according to the Catherine Bergego Scale (CBS) therapist-version. There was a significant difference between the therapist and participant-rated CBS scores (p = 0.004). Functional independence improved significantly between the initial and final assessments (p < 0.001); the effect size (r) was large (r = 0.61). There was a significant improvement in RMI scores (p < 0.001), which was large in size (r = 0.59). Both the STC and CBS-therapist scores were significantly correlated with the Barthel (p < 0.001, p = 0.005, respectively) and with the RMI (p = 0.004, p = 0.028, respectively). The participants substantially enhanced their functional status skills. UN and anosognosia were common problems, and neglect was associated with worse OT program outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Therapy: Neurorehabilitation of Children and Adults)
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