Special Issue "Innovating Public Health in Smart Society: Technical, Behavioral and Management Perspectives"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Dongxiao Gu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The School of Management, Hefei University of Technology, 193 Tunxi Road, Hefei, 230009, China
Interests: data-driven public health; behavioral health IT; managerial and decision issues in public health; health innovation
Prof. Dr. Hemant K Jain
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Gary W. Rollins College of Business, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,615 McCallie Ave, Chattanooga, TN 37403, USA
Interests: support for multidisciplinary cancer care; using virtual worlds for providing medical services; health big data management
Prof. Jiantong Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Economics and Management; Tongji University, 1500 Siping Road, Shanghai, 200092, China
Interests: operational management in health; health service operation; health innovation
Dr. Honglei Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Computer and Information Sciences; University of Northumbira Newcastle, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE18ST, UK
Interests: smart health; virtual health communities; online health informatics; electronic health
Prof. Jia Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The School of Business; East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai, 200237, China
Interests: e-health; health knowledge management; health text mining
Dr. Bin Ding
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Business School Suzhou, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, 111 Ren'ai Road, Suzhou Dushu Lake Science and Education Innovation District, Suzhou 215123, China
Interests: public health; health IT; health service management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, lots of emerging information technologies are beginning to attract a lot of attention, including mobile Internet, big data, communication technology (5G), cloud computing, artificial intelligence, Internet of Things, and so on. The rapid development of these technologies has promoted the intelligence of society. The smart society has improved people’s living standards but also changed people’s habits and ways of thinking.

With the changes in people’s living habits, ways of thinking, forms of communication, and technical support, healthcare is constantly transforming and innovating. Different from traditional medicine, healthcare is combining with emerging technologies to produce effective products, intelligent assisted diagnosis, Internet hospitals, wearable medical devices, intelligent surgical devices, medical big data analysis, online health communities, and other products which have improved people’s medical conditions and health levels.

This Special Issue focuses on how to utilize these transformations and innovations to further promote health, the research perspectives including technology development or application in electronic and smart health, empirical analysis on health behavior, and managerial decision problems in health in smart society. The interests of this Special issue include these topics related to the considerable research challenges and comprehensive achievements.

The List of Topics may include (but is not limited to):

  • Emerging technologies, Internet and health innovation
  • Health IT acceptance or involvement.
  • Health information systems and chronic diseases
  • Behavioral issues in public health science
  • Safety, security and privacy of public health information technologies
  • Artificial intelligence in public health decision science
  • Online health communities
  • Big data and Public health informatics
  • E-health, smart health and Internet hospitals
  • Clinical, public health and genomic data integration
  • Health knowledge management, dissemination, communication and health promotion
  • Elderly health, ageing care and the combination with public healthcare
  • Mobil health and health social networks
  • Mobile Apps, wearable devices, Internet-based health IT products
  • Operation management and decision science in public health
  • Public health policy analysis

Dr. Dongxiao Gu
Prof. Dr. Hemant K Jain
Prof. Jiantong Zhang
Dr. Honglei Li
Prof. Jia Li
Dr. Bin Ding
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • empirical methods for public healthcare studies
  • online health communities and social networks
  • operational and managerial issues in public health
  • data-driven health studies
  • internet health
  • health innovation

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Technical Blossom in Medical Care: The Influence of Big Data Platform on Medical Innovation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 516; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020516 - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
Medical innovation has consistently been an essential subject and a source of support for public health research. Furthermore, improving the level of medical research and development is of great concern in this field. This paper highlights the role of big data in public [...] Read more.
Medical innovation has consistently been an essential subject and a source of support for public health research. Furthermore, improving the level of medical research and development is of great concern in this field. This paper highlights the role of big data in public medical innovation. Based on a sample of China’s listed firms in the medical industry from 2013 to 2018, this paper explores the exogenous shock effect of China’s big data medical policy. Results show that the construction of the medical big data platform effectively promotes innovation investment and the innovation patent of medical firms. In addition, the heterogeneity of this promoting effect is reflected in firm size through the overcoming of different innovation bottlenecks. The research conclusions support the positive significance of the macro-led implementation of the medical big data platform, and suggest that the positive economic externalities generated by this policy are critical to public health. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Perceived Community Support, Users’ Interactions, and Value Co-Creation in Online Health Community: The Moderating Effect of Social Exclusion
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 204; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010204 - 27 Dec 2019
Abstract
Online health communities (OHCs) face the same problem as other social media platforms in terms of decreasing activity and user attrition. Drawing upon organizational support theory, this study explores how perceived community support affects user interactions and value co-creation which in turn influence [...] Read more.
Online health communities (OHCs) face the same problem as other social media platforms in terms of decreasing activity and user attrition. Drawing upon organizational support theory, this study explores how perceived community support affects user interactions and value co-creation which in turn influence their continuous participation. OHCs act as both health knowledge-sharing platforms and important social media for patients, and thus, interpersonal interactions in OHCs are categorized into health-related and general topic interactions. Considering the identity of patients, this study also examines the moderating effect of user-perceived social exclusion on the relationship between community support and user interaction. A total of 292 valid samples from a diabetic patient community in China were used to examine the proposed hypotheses through structural equation modeling. The results show that: (1) Community support has a positive effect on health topic and general topic interactions; (2) both types of interactions have significant positive effects on users’ perceived functional and social values, while general topic interaction is also related positively to users’ perceived affective value; (3) perceived functional value can result directly in continuous participation, while perceived social value contributes indirectly to continuous participation intention through perceived affective value; and (4) users perceived higher social exclusion are more influenced by community support to participate in health topic interactions than those who perceived lower social exclusion, while no significant difference in general topic interactions between two groups. The results of this study can provide implications for both researchers and practitioners. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
How to Manage Diversity and Enhance Team Performance: Evidence from Online Doctor Teams in China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010048 - 19 Dec 2019
Abstract
(1) Background: Traditional one-to-one online consultations with doctors often fail to provide timely and accurate treatment plans; consequently, creating cross-hospital and cross-regional teams has become a new pattern for doctors aiming to offer Internet medical services. Because the online doctor team is a [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Traditional one-to-one online consultations with doctors often fail to provide timely and accurate treatment plans; consequently, creating cross-hospital and cross-regional teams has become a new pattern for doctors aiming to offer Internet medical services. Because the online doctor team is a new virtual organizational model, it remains to be explained and investigated. (2) Methods: Combining the information processing view and the social categorization view, this study takes the perspective of team diversity and empirically investigates the effect of team diversity on team performance. We consider four kinds of team diversity, including status capital diversity, decision capital diversity, online reputation diversity, and professional knowledge diversity, and we investigate how team composition from the diversity perspective affects online doctor team performance and how leader reputation moderates the effect of team diversity on team performance. We use secondary data from a leading online medical consultation platform in China (Good Doctor), and our research data include 1568 teams with a total of 5481 doctors. (3) Results: The results show that status capital diversity and decision capital diversity negatively affect team performance; diversity in terms of online reputation and professional knowledge positively affect team performance; and leader reputation moderates the impact of status capital diversity and online reputation on team performance. (4) Conclusions: Our study offers management suggestions on how to form a high-performance doctor team and provides advice for the future development of online doctor teams. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop