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Indoor Air Quality: Risk Assessment and Public Health

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Air".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 3971

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Foundation for the Promotion of Health and Biomedical Research in the Valencian Region (FISABIO-Public Health), Av. Catalunya 21, 46020 Valencia, Spain
Interests: pesticides; ambient air; risk assessment; emerging pollutants; analytical methods; biomonitoring
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Foundation for the Promotion of Health and Biomedical Research in the Valencian Region (FISABIO-Public Health), Av. Catalunya 21, 46020 Valencia, Spain
2. Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Valencia, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, Spain
Interests: risk assessment; plastics; biomonitoring; environment; emerging pollutants; analytical methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Indoor Analysis is a need for health and safety reasons and the control of indoor air quality is a challenge due to the low concentration of many contaminants and the difficulties of sampling, sample transport and preservation concerning the physical state of target molecules and their association to suspended particles. In this regard, taking into account that people spend more than 90 % of their time in indoor environments, the control of pollutants in indoor environments is a matter of interest and a research field of growing interest.

This Special Issue aims to feature full-length articles, reviews, and communications addressing novel research on this topic from a multidisciplinary point of view, including (but not limited to):

  • Levels of pollutants in indoor air ambient (mainly air and dust samples).
  • Respiratory viruses in indoor air environments.
  • External exposure assessment of pollutants.
  • Alternative approaches for risk assessment and management.
  • New regulatory guidelines for emerging pollutants.
  • Case-studies, results, and findings in specific geographical regions.

All contributions regarding fundamental and applied research on these topics, including novel research and results conducted by undergraduate or PhD students are welcomed in this Special Issue.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Air.

Dr. Antonio López
Dr. Pablo Miralles
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • air quality
  • risk assessment
  • emerging pollutants
  • environmental control
  • public health guidelines

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 1703 KiB  
Article
Method Development for Detecting Low Level Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) among Workers and Residents from a Carpentry Work Shop in a Palestinian Village
by Shehdeh Jodeh, Abdelkhaleq Chakir, Ghadir Hanbali, Estelle Roth and Abdelrahman Eid
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(9), 5613; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20095613 - 23 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1811
Abstract
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are considered a major public health concern in industrial location areas. The presence of exposure to (VOCs) has raised concern regarding the health effects caused by chronic human exposure as this will increase cancer diseases in the village. An [...] Read more.
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are considered a major public health concern in industrial location areas. The presence of exposure to (VOCs) has raised concern regarding the health effects caused by chronic human exposure as this will increase cancer diseases in the village. An analytical method has been developed and modified to help us detect 38 VOCs in the blood of 38 volunteers who are related to a carpentry shop at the parts-per-trillion level. To measure and evaluate the potential risk, several devices, such as portable passive monitors and air-collected samples, in addition to blood concentration, were used to study three different occupational groups. Ten of the volunteers are employees at the shop, 10 volunteers live very close to the shop, and 10 of them are students in an elementary school very close to the shop. In this study, we developed an automated analytical method using headspace (HS) together with solid-phase microextraction (SPME) connected to capillary gas chromatography (GC) equipped with quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS). The detection limits for the method used were measured in the range from 0.001 to 0.15 ng/L, using linear calibration curves that have three orders of magnitude. The detected concentrations ranged from 3 ng L−1 for trichloroethene to 91 ng L−1 for toluene and 270 ng L−1 for 2,4-diisocyanate, which was derived from the paint solvents used for the wood in the carpentry shop and the paints on the walls. More than half of all assessed species (80%) had mean concentration values less than 50 ng L−1, which is the maximum allowed for most VOCs. The major chemical types among the compounds quantified will be those we found in our previous study in the surrounding air of a carpentry workshop in Deir Ballout in Palestine, which were toluene diisocyanate and butyl cyanate. Some were found to be highly present air. Most of the measurements were below the guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO). Despite the fact that this study only involved a small number of smokers, smoking was found to be connected with several blood and breath components. This group includes unsaturated hydrocarbons (1,3-butadiene, 1,3-pentadiene, 2-butene), furans (2,5-dimethylfuran), and acetonitrile. The proposed classification of measured species into systemic (blood-borne) and exogenous volatiles is strictly hypothetical, as some species may have several origins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Quality: Risk Assessment and Public Health)
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12 pages, 2461 KiB  
Article
Pesticides in the Indoor Environment of Residential Houses: A Case Study in Strasbourg, France
by Josephine Al-Alam, Alexandre Sonnette, Olivier Delhomme, Laurent Y. Alleman, Patrice Coddeville and Maurice Millet
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14049; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114049 - 28 Oct 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1489
Abstract
Indoor environmental exposure to pesticides has become one of the major concerns that might adversely affect human health and development. People spend most of their lifetime in enclosed indoor environments where they might inhale harmful toxic chemicals, such as pesticides, dispersed either in [...] Read more.
Indoor environmental exposure to pesticides has become one of the major concerns that might adversely affect human health and development. People spend most of their lifetime in enclosed indoor environments where they might inhale harmful toxic chemicals, such as pesticides, dispersed either in particulate or in a gas phase. In this study, an assessment of pesticide contamination in indoor environments was conducted. The study covered nine houses during one year, starting from February 2016 and ending in February 2017, in which both air and dust samples were assessed for their potential contamination with 50 pesticides. The results showed that all the assessed houses were contaminated by several pesticides, especially with the allethrin pesticide (detection frequency (DF) = 100%). The highest pesticide contamination was detected in the spring/summer season when it reached an average of around 185 ng g−1 and 186.4 ng sampler−1 in the collected dust and air samples, respectively. The potential contamination of pyrethroid insecticides within all the targeted samples revealed by this study stresses the importance of minimizing the use of such indoor treatments as part of the efficient prevention and control of human exposure to pesticides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Quality: Risk Assessment and Public Health)
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