Special Issue "A Focus on Healthcare from the Perspective of Gender, Culture, Management, and the Economy"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. José Siles Gonzalez
Website
Leading Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Alicante, 03690 Alicante, Spain
Interests: nursing history; anthropology of care; nursing based on narrative; health, context, and culture; dialectical structural model of care; anthropology of education
Prof. Dr. Carmen Solano Ruiz
Website SciProfiles
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences University of Alicante, 03690 Alicante, Spain
Interests: clinical anthropology; anthropology of care; gender and health; intercultural care; anthropology of education
Prof. Dr. Paulo Joaquim Pina Queirós
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Escola Superior de Enfermagem de Coimbra, 3046-851 Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: nursing history; theory; method of care; epistemology
Prof. Dr. Benito Yañez-Araque
Website SciProfiles
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 45071 Toledo, Spain
Interests: healthcare and hospital management; occupational risks prevention; corporate social responsibility; quality management; marketing; strategy; corporate governance; business intelligence; innovation; human resources; sports management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The literature has highlighted the organization and provision of health-oriented care in societies over time, along with the implications for gender equality. In turn, care throughout history (both paid and unpaid) has been fundamental to both human wellbeing and economic and social development. In other words, what is of particular interest to the care economy is the relationship between the way societies have organized their members’ healthcare and the management of the functioning of the health economic system. Therefore, gender and culture are foundations of individual and social identity, which condition the various forms of interaction in the care administration relationship between the professional and the patient/family. In recent years, emphasis has been placed on the study of the so-called care economy from the perspective of gender, culture, and healthcare management.

The objective that we propose in this Special Edition is to bring together the latest research framed in the culture of care, its evolution in societies, care economics, and care management, highlighting the gender perspective. Likewise, we propose to do this through the adoption of transdisciplinary approaches that prioritize in these studies relational analysis in the context of health scenarios, ideologies, and people.

Therefore, studies are justified in relation to health and illness, the culture of care, and the profile (sex/gender) of the care provider. This Special Issue seeks studies with different quantitative and qualitative methodologies, as well as studies of mixed methods. Reviews following quality criteria will also be considered. We particularly welcome research projects that adopt a multisectoral and transdisciplinary approach.

Prof. Dr. José Siles Gonzalez
Prof. Dr. Carmen Solano Ruiz
Prof. Dr. Paulo Joaquim Pina Queirós
Prof. Dr. Benito Yañez-Araque
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gender and health
  • intercultural care
  • health economics
  • health education
  • hospital management
  • health promotion
  • healthcare
  • clinical anthropology
  • anthropology of education

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Translation and Validation of the Modified A-DIVA Scale to European Portuguese: Difficult Intravenous Access Scale for Adult Patients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7552; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207552 - 17 Oct 2020
Abstract
(1) Background: In Portugal, no accurate and reliable predictive instruments are known that could assist healthcare professionals in recognizing patients with difficult venous access. Thus, this study aimed to translate and validate the Modified A-DIVA scale to European Portuguese. (2) Methods: A methodological [...] Read more.
(1) Background: In Portugal, no accurate and reliable predictive instruments are known that could assist healthcare professionals in recognizing patients with difficult venous access. Thus, this study aimed to translate and validate the Modified A-DIVA scale to European Portuguese. (2) Methods: A methodological and cross-sectional study was conducted in two phases: translation of the Modified A-DIVA scale to European Portuguese following six stages proposed by Beaton and collaborators, and assessment of its psychometric properties in a non-probability sample of 100 patients who required peripheral intravenous catheterization in a Portuguese hospital. (3) Results: The European version of the Modified A-DIVA scale (A-DM scale) showed excellent inter-rater accordance scores, k = 0.593 (95% CI, 0.847 to 0.970), p < 0.0005. The A-DM scale’s criterion and construct validity was assessed through predictive, convergent, and correlational analysis with variables identified in the literature as associated with difficult peripheral intravenous access, with moderate to large magnitudes and statistical significance. (4) Conclusions: The A-DM scale is a reliable and valid instrument that can support healthcare professionals and researchers in the early identification of patients at risk of difficult peripheral intravenous access. Future validation studies are needed to test the A-DM scale’s applicability across clinical settings and in different patient cohorts. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Knowledge, Attitude, Practices, and Satisfaction of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing among Chinese Pregnant Women under Different Payment Schemes: A Comparative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7187; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197187 - 30 Sep 2020
Abstract
Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for aneuploidy screening has been widely applied across China, and costs can affect Chinese pregnant women’s choices. This study aims to assess the knowledge, attitude, practices (KAP) and satisfaction regarding NIPT among pregnant women in China, and to further [...] Read more.
Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for aneuploidy screening has been widely applied across China, and costs can affect Chinese pregnant women’s choices. This study aims to assess the knowledge, attitude, practices (KAP) and satisfaction regarding NIPT among pregnant women in China, and to further explore the relationship between payment schemes and women’s acceptability of and satisfaction with NIPT. A questionnaire survey was performed in Shenzhen and Zhengzhou, China, which separately applied “insurance coverage” and “out-of-pocket” payment scheme for NIPT. The major differences between the two cities were compared using chi-square test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and propensity score matched analysis. Logistic regression models were applied to explore predictors for women’s acceptability and satisfaction. Compared with Zhengzhou participants, a higher proportion of Shenzhen women had heard of NIPT (87.30% vs. 64.03%), were willing to receive NIPT (91.80% vs. 80.43%) and had taken NIPT (83.12% vs. 54.54%), while their satisfaction level was lower. Having NIPT-related knowledge was associated with higher acceptability, and receiving genetic counseling helped to improve satisfaction. Besides, women with higher annual household incomes were more likely to take and be satisfied with NIPT. In conclusion, more attention should be paid to health education, subsidies for NIPT, and genetic counseling. Full article

Review

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Open AccessReview
Developing a Family-Centered Care Model in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU): A New Vision to Manage Healthcare
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7197; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197197 - 01 Oct 2020
Abstract
Family-centered care (FCC) currently takes a greater role in health care, due to the increasing empowerment parents experience. Within neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), family participation has an impact on the humanized care of the preterm newborn (PN). This integrative review conducted according [...] Read more.
Family-centered care (FCC) currently takes a greater role in health care, due to the increasing empowerment parents experience. Within neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), family participation has an impact on the humanized care of the preterm newborn (PN). This integrative review conducted according to Whittemore and Knafl investigated current knowledge of the FCC model and its application in PN care in specific units. The data were collected from PubMed, Cochrane, CINHAL, Scopus, and Google Scholar. A total of 45 articles were used, of which 13 were selected which met inclusion criteria. Their methodological quality was evaluated using the mixed method appraisal tool (MMAT), and after they were analyzed and grouped into four thematic blocks: (1) parental participation; (2) health parental training; (3) benefits of family empowerment; and (4) humanized care. The results revealed that FCCs promote the integration of health equipment and family. In addition, parents become the primary caregivers. The benefits of the family–PN binomial enable an earlier hospital discharge. Humanized care involves an ethical approach, improving health care. Changes are still needed by health managers to adapt health services to the needs of the family and PNs. Full article
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