Special Issue "Health Effects of Cannabis Use"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Lucy J. Troup
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Education and Social Sciences, University of the West of Scotland, Technology Ave, Blantyre, Glasgow G72 0LH, UK
Interests: cannabis; medical cannabis; EEG; emotion processing; emotion processing disorders; mental health; addiction
Dr. Thorsten Rudroff
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Health and Human Physiology, Department of Neurology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
Interests: neurophysiology; cannabis; non-invasive brain stimulation; neuroimaging; fatigue
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Simon Erridge
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Exhibition Rd, South Kensington, London SW7 2BX, UK
Interests: medical cannabis; cancer diagnosis; obesity and chronic health conditions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The cannabis plant has a long and sometimes difficult history. Currently there is significant legislation in place in many countries that makes it difficult to understand the potential benefit of cannabis to support a number of health conditions. Even where there is legislation in support of cannabis use for medicinal purposes, access for a wide range of potential patients is still prohibited. To enable researchers to present a case for the positives and understand any possible risks, we need to both create a scientific appreciation for the complexity of cannabis as a medicine and to reduce the stigma that has become attached to the notion of cannabis as a treatment for a number of conditions. The scientific literature is constantly evolving in this area. However, there is still a significant amount of contradiction and lack of consensus in relation to cannabis as a medicine.

This Special Issue aims to bring together researchers across disciplines to present research that expands our understanding of cannabis as a medicine. Further, it will explore the barriers to accepting the potential benefits of both synthetic and phytocannabiniods as treatment options for patients within a sensible legislative model.  

Dr. Lucy J. Troup
Dr. Thorsten Rudroff
Dr. Simon Erridge
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cannabis
  • medical cannabis
  • mental health
  • phytocannabinoids

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Disparity between Perceptual Fall Risk and Physiological Fall Risk in Older Cannabis Users: A Pilot Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010109 - 23 Dec 2021
Viewed by 416
Abstract
Aging is associated with cognitive decline and increased fall risk. Cognitive impairment is associated with cannabis use, which is increasing among older adults. Perceptual and physiological fall risk are discordant in some older adults, but whether cannabis use influences this association is unknown. [...] Read more.
Aging is associated with cognitive decline and increased fall risk. Cognitive impairment is associated with cannabis use, which is increasing among older adults. Perceptual and physiological fall risk are discordant in some older adults, but whether cannabis use influences this association is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible disparities between perceptual and physiological fall risk in older cannabis users. Eight older medical cannabis users and eight sex- and age-matched non-users provided data on perceptual and physiological fall risk. Group differences were assessed, and perceptual fall risk was correlated with physiological fall risk. Perceptual risk and most of the physiological fall risk variables were equivalent between the groups. However, cannabis users performed significantly worse on unipedal stance than non-users. In addition, perceptual fall risk had weak correlations with physiological fall risk in the users (Spearman’s rho = 0.17–0.41) and moderate-strong correlations in non-users (rho = −0.18–0.67). Cannabis users might have a discrepancy between perceptual and physiological fall risk. Because both concepts play a role in quality of life, identifying strategies to improve them may have significant benefits. Future studies investigating additional perceptual (e.g., cognition, fear of falling, depression, anxiety), physiological (e.g., more challenging static and dynamic balance conditions), and general fall risk are warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Effects of Cannabis Use)
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