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Special Issue "Environmental Microbiology and Urban Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Christine Stauber

School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Lisa Casanova

School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The majority of the world’s population lives in urban settings, and this number will continue to grow, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The structure of these settings can influence how humans interact with microorganisms, the microbial communities that develop. and how they impact human health. This Special Issue will focus on the unique aspects of environmental microbiology in urban environments. Key topics to be considered for this Issue include the following: novel examinations of the role of urban environments in shaping the structure and function of microorganisms in urban environments; modern approaches to measuring microorganisms in densely populated urban settings; the role of environmental microbiology in urban exposure assessment; and the benefits and disadvantages of urban environments for the concentration and mitigation of microbial risks.

Prof. Dr. Christine Stauber
Prof. Dr. Lisa Casanova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental microbiology and urban health
  • built environment
  • urban gradient
  • comparative studies
  • pathogens

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Genetic Characterization and Clonality of Legionella pneumophila Isolated from Cooling Towers in Japan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1664; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091664
Received: 25 April 2019 / Revised: 9 May 2019 / Accepted: 10 May 2019 / Published: 13 May 2019
PDF Full-text (768 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We investigated the genetic characteristics of 161 Legionella pneumophila strains isolated over a period of 10 years from cooling towers in Japan. Minimum spanning tree analysis based on the sequence-based typing (SBT) of them identified three clonal complexes (CCs); CC1 (105/161, 65.2%), CC2 [...] Read more.
We investigated the genetic characteristics of 161 Legionella pneumophila strains isolated over a period of 10 years from cooling towers in Japan. Minimum spanning tree analysis based on the sequence-based typing (SBT) of them identified three clonal complexes (CCs); CC1 (105/161, 65.2%), CC2 (22 /161, 13.7%), and CC3 (20/161, 12.4%). CC1 was formed by serogroup (SG) 1 and SG7, whereas CC2 was mainly formed by SG1. All of the CC3 isolates except two strains were SG13. The major sequence types (STs) in CC1 and CC2 were ST1 (88/105, 83.8%) and ST154 (15/22, 68.2%), respectively. These STs are known as typical types of L. pneumophila SG1 in Japanese cooling tower. Additionally, we identified 15 strains of ST2603 as the major type in CC3. This ST has not been reported in Japanese cooling tower. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis of the representative strains in the three CCs, which were isolated from various cooling towers over the 10 years, elucidated high clonal population of L. pneumophila in Japanese cooling tower. Moreover, it revealed that the strains of CC2 are phylogenetically distant compared to those of CC1 and CC3, and belonged to L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Microbiology and Urban Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria from Public Libraries via Proteomics Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 912; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16060912
Received: 30 January 2019 / Revised: 25 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 March 2019 / Published: 14 March 2019
PDF Full-text (8335 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Hazardous organisms may thrive on surfaces that are often exposed to human contact, including children’s library books. In this study, swab samples were taken from 42 children’s books collected from four public libraries in Texas and California. Samples were then cultivated in brain–heart [...] Read more.
Hazardous organisms may thrive on surfaces that are often exposed to human contact, including children’s library books. In this study, swab samples were taken from 42 children’s books collected from four public libraries in Texas and California. Samples were then cultivated in brain–heart infusion (BHI) medium and then in Luria broth (LB) medium containing either ampicillin or kanamycin. All 42 samples (100%) were positive for bacterial growth in normal BHI medium. Furthermore, 35 samples (83.3%) and 20 samples (47.6%) in total were positive in LB medium containing ampicillin or kanamycin, respectively. Bacterial populations were then identified in samples using an Orbitrap Fusion™ Tribrid ™ mass spectrometer, a state-of-the-art proteomic analysis tool. Identified bacterial species grown in ampicillin included Bacillus, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Serratia, Streptococcus, Escherichia, Salmonella, and Enterococcus. In contrast, identified bacteria grown in kanamycin included Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Bacillus. The presences of pathogenic bacteria species were also confirmed. The results of this study warrant follow up studies to assess the potential health risks of identified pathogens. This study demonstrates the utility of proteomics in identifying environmental pathogenic bacteria for specific public health risk evaluations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Microbiology and Urban Health)
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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