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Interval Training: Different Approaches and Designs Applied to Health and Fitness

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 4433

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Physical Education and Sports Center, Federal University of Espírito Santo, Av. Fernando Ferrari, 514 - Goiabeiras, Vitória 29075-910, ES, Brazil
Interests: physical fitness; exercise physiology; whole body exercise; cardiovascular physiology

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Guest Editor
Master's Program in Assessment and Intervention of Physical and Functional Performance, Ibirapuera University, Av. Interlagos, 1329 - 4º - Chácara Flora, São Paulo 04661-100, SP, Brazil
Interests: high-intensity interval training; strength training; physical activity; whole body exercise

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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education, Faculdade Estacio de Sá, Av. Dr. Herwan Modenese Wanderley, 1001 - Jardim Camburi, Vitória 29092-095, ES, Brazil
Interests: physical activity; physical exercise; adolescent; kids; children

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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário - Lagoa Nova, Natal 59078-970, RN, Brazil
Interests: high-intensity interval training delivered to healthy and clinical populations; physical activity and aging

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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, University of Padova, Via Giustiniani, 2, 35128 Padova, PD, Italy
Interests: physical activity and aging; physical activity and chronic diseases; functional evaluation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Exercise training is a cornerstone to improve several health- and fitness-related outcomes, such as blood pressure, fasting glucose, body composition, maximal oxygen uptake, and muscle strength. Despite this, most individuals do not meet the minimum amount of moderate (150 minutes) or vigorous (75 minutes) exercise per week. Thus, the development of new perspectives of exercise training delivered for healthy and clinical populations seems to be important to improve exercise participation. In the last decade, studies have shown that interval training is able to elicit similar or superior improvements in health- and fitness-related outcomes compared to traditional moderate continuous training in a time-efficient manner. Of note, given that there is no “all size fits all” approach, it is imperative to advance in the knowledge about the effects of different interval training designs on health- and fitness-related outcomes in healthy and clinical populations. This is particularly important because there are several possibilities of interval training designs, including, for example, low- and high-volume high-intensity interval training (HIIT), sprint interval training (SIT), high-intensity functional training (HIFT), HIIT body work, and small-sided games. Therefore, the Editors of this Special Issue “Interval Training: Different Approaches and Designs Applied to Health and Fitness” in IJERPH would like to invite the authors to submit their original or review studies about the effects of interval training on health-, sport- and/or fitness-related outcomes in healthy, sport performance or clinical populations. Potential topics of this Special Issue include studies designed to assess the effects of interval training on:

  • Health-related outcomes;
  • Fitness-related outcomes;
  • Sport-related outcomes;
  • Psychological responses related to adherence and participation in physical exercise;
  • Physiological responses and animals models.

In addition, original and review studies about new perspectives of interval training designs and their physiological and psychological responses in healthy as well as in clinical populations and basic studies using animal models are welcome to this Special Issue of IJERPH.

Prof. Dr. Danilo Sales Bocalini
Prof. Dr. Alexandre Lopes Evangelista
Prof. Dr. Roberta Luksevicius Rica
Prof. Dr. Eduardo Caldas Costa
Dr. Valentina Bullo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical exercise
  • physiological responses
  • morphological adaptations
  • functional adaptations
  • physical fitness

Published Papers (2 papers)

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12 pages, 1789 KiB  
Article
A Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing for Prescribing High-Intensity Interval Training Sessions with Elastic Resistance
by Lorena Flores Duarte, Victor Hugo Gasparini-Neto, Letícia Nascimento Santos Neves, Lenice Brum Nunes, Richard Diego Leite, Nuno Manoel Frade de Sousa and Luciana Carletti
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(23), 7097; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20237097 - 22 Nov 2023
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Abstract
This study aims to analyze the agreement of cardiopulmonary variables between a cardiopulmonary exercise test with elastic resistance (CPxEL) and high-intensity interval exercise with elastic resistance (EL-HIIE). Methods: Twenty-two physically independent participants were recruited. Visit one consisted of conducting a health survey and [...] Read more.
This study aims to analyze the agreement of cardiopulmonary variables between a cardiopulmonary exercise test with elastic resistance (CPxEL) and high-intensity interval exercise with elastic resistance (EL-HIIE). Methods: Twenty-two physically independent participants were recruited. Visit one consisted of conducting a health survey and anthropometric assessment. On visit two, the participants performed CPxEL. After seven days, on visit three, the participants performed EL-HIIE. The CPxEL was carried out on a rubber mat demarcated by lines representing eight stages. The test consisted of alternating back and forth steps against elastic resistance. The increments were performed at a rate of one stage per minute, following a cadence controlled by a metronome calibrated by beats per minute (bpm). The EL-HIIE was performed at the stage corresponding to an intensity of ~85% VO2max, as determined by CPxEL. The EL-HIIE consisted of 10 × 1 min (work):1 min (passive rest), with a cadence of 200 bpm. Cardiopulmonary parameters, heart rate (HR), and oxygen consumption (VO2) were measured during exercise. Bland–Altman was applied to analyze the agreement between the HR and VO2 found in EL-HIIE and the values prescribed by CPxEL (~85–90% VO2max). Results: The HRpeak and VO2peak in the EL-HIIE showed good agreement with the VO2CPxEL and HRCPxEL values, showing an average difference of (−1.7 mL·kg−1·min−1) and (0.3 bpm). Conclusions: The results of the present study demonstrate the agreement of cardiopulmonary variables between the CPxEL and the EL-HIIE. Therefore, for a more specific prescription of EL-HIIE intensity, CPxEL can be used. Full article
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22 pages, 1369 KiB  
Systematic Review
Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage after a High-Intensity Interval Exercise Session: Systematic Review
by Carine D. F. C. Leite, Paulo V. C. Zovico, Roberta L. Rica, Bruna M. Barros, Alexandre F. Machado, Alexandre L. Evangelista, Richard D. Leite, Valerio G. Barauna, Adriano F. Maia and Danilo S. Bocalini
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(22), 7082; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20227082 - 20 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2395
Abstract
High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is considered an effective method to improve fitness and health indicators, but its high-intensity exercises and the mechanical and metabolic stress generated during the session can lead to the occurrence of exercise-induced muscle damage. Therefore, this study aimed to [...] Read more.
High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is considered an effective method to improve fitness and health indicators, but its high-intensity exercises and the mechanical and metabolic stress generated during the session can lead to the occurrence of exercise-induced muscle damage. Therefore, this study aimed to describe, by means of a systematic review, the effects of a single HIIT session on exercise-induced muscle damage. A total of 43 studies were found in the Medline/PubMed Science Direct/Embase/Scielo/CINAHL/LILACS databases; however, after applying the exclusion criteria, only 15 articles were considered eligible for this review. The total sample was 315 participants. Among them, 77.2% were men, 13.3% were women and 9.5 uninformed. Their age ranged from 20.1 ± 2 to 47.8 ± 7.5 years. HIIT protocols included running with ergometers (n = 6), CrossFit-specific exercises (n = 2), running without ergometers (n = 3), swimming (n = 1), the Wingate test on stationary bicycles (n = 2), and cycling (n = 1). The most applied intensity controls were %vVO2max, “all out”, MV, MAV, Vmax, and HRreserve%. The most used markers to evaluate muscle damage were creatine kinase, myoglobin, and lactate dehydrogenase. The time for muscle damage assessment ranged from immediately post exercise to seven days. HIIT protocols were able to promote changes in markers of exercise-induced muscle damage, evidenced by increases in CK, Mb, LDH, AST, ALT, pain, and muscle circumference observed mainly immediately and 24 h after the HIIT session. Full article
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