Special Issue "Dental Care for Elderly and Special Groups"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Oral Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Katherine Chiu Man Leung
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Interests: oral health of medically compromised patients; oral health of geriatric patients; oral health-related quality of life
Prof. Dr. Chun Hung Chu
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Interests: preventive dentistry; community dentistry; fluorides; dental caries
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral diseases are common in the elderly population which can lead to pain, tooth loss, disfigurement, poor chewing efficiency, and reduced life quality. Dental and oral health conditions in the elders are often compromised by their underlying chronic health problems. Notwithstanding this, therapeutic treatment of chronic diseases and over-the-counter medications can lead to reduction in salivary flow that further complicates oral health and puts elders under high risk of caries and oral mucosal infections. Similarly, dental treatments for people who have special needs and demand special care often pose great challenges to dentists. Dental care programs designed for the elderly and special groups which aim at disease prevention, replacement of tissue loss, and restoration of function should take into account their health conditions and capabilities of self-care. Cooperation among medical and dental professionals and allied healthcare workers is necessary. 

This Special Issue welcomes studies and reviews on dental care for elderly and special groups. Links of oral health and general health, development of treatment approaches, evaluation of treatment, and dental care programs for elders and special groups are also within the scope of this issue.

Dr. Katherine Chiu Man Leung
Prof. Dr. Chun Hung Chu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • elderly
  • chewing
  • special needs
  • oral health conditions
  • dental care
  • xerostomia

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Oral Health Status and the Impact on Oral Health-Related Quality of Life among the Institutionalized Elderly Population: A Cross-Sectional Study in an Area of Southern Italy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2175; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042175 - 23 Feb 2021
Abstract
Background: The objectives of this study were to describe the oral health status in the institutionalized geriatric population in an area of southern Italy and to identify the impact of oral health on the Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL). Methods: Data [...] Read more.
Background: The objectives of this study were to describe the oral health status in the institutionalized geriatric population in an area of southern Italy and to identify the impact of oral health on the Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL). Methods: Data were collected from individuals aged ≥60 years in randomly selected Calabrian long-term care facilities. The dental health status was assessed recording the decayed, missing, or filled dental elements due to the carious lesions (DMFT) index, the presence of visible dental plaque, and the gingival condition. The influence of the dental health status on the self-perceived value of life was assessed using the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI). Results: Among the 344 elderly individuals included, 18.4% reported frequent tooth-brushing, and only 39.9% reported the need of dental care. The DMFT index was 26.4. Less than a third of the participants had a GOHAI score of ≤50 which is suggestive of highly compromised OHRQoL. The GOHAI score was significantly better for elderly individuals with no self-perceived need of dental care and with a lower DMFT index. Conclusions: The burden of oral conditions among residents in long-term care facilities was considerable, with a high prevalence of missing teeth and dentures. Strategies targeting care providers are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Care for Elderly and Special Groups)
Open AccessArticle
Investigation of the Impact of Endodontic Therapy on Survival among Dialysis Patients in Taiwan: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 326; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010326 - 05 Jan 2021
Abstract
Objectives Dental problems occur widely in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and may increase comorbidities. Root canal therapy (RCT) is a common procedure for advanced decayed caries with pulp inflammation and root canals. However, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients are considered to [...] Read more.
Objectives Dental problems occur widely in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and may increase comorbidities. Root canal therapy (RCT) is a common procedure for advanced decayed caries with pulp inflammation and root canals. However, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients are considered to have a higher risk of potentially life-threatening infections after treatment and might fail to receive satisfactory dental care such as RCT. We investigated whether appropriate intervention for dental problems had a potential impact among dialysis patients. Design Men and women who began maintenance dialysis (hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis) between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2015, in Taiwan (total 12,454 patients) were enrolled in this study. Participants were followed up from the first reported dialysis date to the date of death or end of dialysis by December 31, 2015. Setting Data collection was conducted in Taiwan. Results A total of 2633 and 9821 patients were classified into the RCT and non-RCT groups, respectively. From the data of Taiwan’s National Health Insurance, a total of 5,092,734 teeth received RCT from 2000 to 2015. Then, a total of 12,454 patients were followed within the 16 years, and 4030 patients passed away. The results showed that members of the non-RCT group (34.93%) had a higher mortality rate than those of the RCT group (22.79%; p = 0.001). The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio for the risk of death was 0.69 (RCT vs. non-RCT; p = 0.001). Conclusions This study suggested that patients who had received RCT had a relatively lower risk of death among dialysis patients. Infectious diseases had a significant role in mortality among dialysis patients with non-RCT. Appropriate interventions for dental problems may increase survival among dialysis patients. Abbreviations: CKD = chronic kidney disease, ESRD = end-stage renal disease, RCT = root canal therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Care for Elderly and Special Groups)
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