ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Biogeochemical Behavior of Environmental Pollutants: From Source to Spread in Gas, Water and Soil Matrices"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022 | Viewed by 3242

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jacopo Cabassi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources (IGG), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Via G. La Pira 4, 50121 Florence, Italy
Interests: environmental geochemistry; fluid geochemistry; mercury pollution
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Stefania Venturi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Florence, Via G. La Pira 4, 50121 Florence, Italy
Interests: biogeochemistry; VOCs; greenhouse gases; isotope geochemistry; air pollution; water quality; interstitial soil gases; diffuse soil gas emissions
Dr. Barbara Nisi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CNR-IGG Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, 50121 Firenze, Italy
Interests: environmental geochemistry; river geochemistry; CO2 risk assessment; isotope geochemistry
Dr. Alessandro Acquavita
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Regional Agency for the Protection of the Environment of Friuli Venezia Giulia (ARPA FVG), 33057 Palmanova, UD, Italy
Interests: environmental pollution of coastal areas; marine biogeochemistry; mercury; nutrients and trophic state; risk assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Sergio Calabrese
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e del Mare, University of Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123 Palermo Italy
Interests: investigation of volcanic emissions, evolution and atmospheric dispersion of volcanic gases and particulates, on the geochemical monitoring of atmospheric deposition, and on the environmental impact of volcanic emissions

Special Issue Information

The assessment, protection, and improvement of air, water and soil quality are of major concern in modern times. Significant amounts of pollutants are released from both anthropogenic activities and natural contexts and have a strong impact on both environment and human systems. They are able to be absorbed and metabolized by gas, water, and soil matrices. Understanding the biogeochemical processes that guide the release and spread of contaminants is thus of fundamental importance for the sustainable development of our planet. This Special Issue wants to bring together multidisciplinary researches dealing with the origin and distribution of environmental pollutants in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and pedosphere, focusing on the chemical-physical and biological processes regulating their behaviour. We are also looking for papers concerning the study and management of contaminated sites for risk assessment and mitigation purposes, as well as those which describe new measurement procedures and/or analytical methods to investigate and quantify the different organic and inorganic pollutants. In particular, scientific works concerning pollutants that are particularly pervasive in the environment and with a significant impact on human health, such as mercury, are welcome and recommended.

Dr. Jacopo Cabassi
Dr. Stefania Venturi
Dr. Barbara Nisi
Dr. Alessandro Acquavita
Dr. Sergio Calabrese
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental geochemistry 
  • environmental pollution 
  • air, water and soil quality 
  • biogeochemical processes

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Mercury and Arsenic Discharge from Circumneutral Waters Associated with the Former Mining Area of Abbadia San Salvatore (Tuscany, Central Italy)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5131; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095131 - 23 Apr 2022
Viewed by 446
Abstract
Dissolved and suspended toxic elements in water discharged from abandoned and active mining areas pose several critical issues, since they represent a threat to the environment. In this work, we investigated the water, suspended particulates, and stream sediments of a 2.1 km long [...] Read more.
Dissolved and suspended toxic elements in water discharged from abandoned and active mining areas pose several critical issues, since they represent a threat to the environment. In this work, we investigated the water, suspended particulates, and stream sediments of a 2.1 km long creek (Fosso della Chiusa) that is fed by waters draining the galleries of the abandoned Hg mining area of Abbadia San Salvatore (Mt. Amiata, Tuscany, central Italy). The geochemical results show evidence that the studied matrices are characterized by relatively high concentrations of Hg and As, whereas those of Sb are generally close to or below the instrumental detection limit. Independent of the matrices, the concentration of As decreases from the emergence point to the confluence with the Pagliola creek. In contrast, Hg concentrations display more complex behavior, as water and sediment are mainly characterized by concentrations that significantly increase along the water course. According to the geoaccumulation index (Igeo), sediments belong to Class 6 (extremely contaminated) for Hg. The Igeo of As varies from Class 6, close to the emergence, to Class 2 (moderately contaminated), dropping to Class 0 (uncontaminated) at the confluence with the Pagliola creek. Finally, the total mass load of Hg and As entering the Pagliola creek was computed to be 1.3 and 0.5 kg/year, respectively, when a mean flow rate of 40 L/s was considered. The calculated loads are relatively low, but, when the Fosso della Chiusa drainage basin is taken into account, the specific load is comparable to, or even higher than, those of other mining areas. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Cadmium, Chromium, and Cobalt in the Organs of Glyceria maxima and Bottom Sediments of the Pisa River and Its Tributaries (Poland)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10193; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910193 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 469
Abstract
The aim of the presented article was to determine whether human activity significantly influenced the enrichment of Cd, Co, and Cr, in river sediments and Glyceria maxima, in the basin of the Pisa River, an underdeveloped area in Poland. In this study, [...] Read more.
The aim of the presented article was to determine whether human activity significantly influenced the enrichment of Cd, Co, and Cr, in river sediments and Glyceria maxima, in the basin of the Pisa River, an underdeveloped area in Poland. In this study, the content and spatial distribution of Cd, Cr, and Co in the organs underground and above ground, (sequentially: root, stem, leaf) of Glyceria maxima and bottom sediments of the Pisa River and its tributaries (Pisza Woda, Wincenta, Turośl and Skroda River) were analyzed. The Potentially toxic elements (PTEs) were determined by ASA method (Atomic Absorption Spectrometry). The results showed that the average PTEs contents in the river sediments occurred in the following descending order of Cd < Co < Cr. The highest values of the Igeo, CF coefficients, i.e., the greatest impact of anthropogenic activities on the water environment of the Pisa River and its tributaries, were found especially in the case of Cd. The research on the plant material has shown that the highest content of Cr and Co occurs in the roots, then in the stems, and the least in the leaves of Glyceria maxima. However, the amounts of Cd in the examined parts of Glyceria maxima had similar values. The content of Cd, Cr, and Co in the roots and above-ground parts exceeded the physiological values. Glyceria maxima can be used as a biological indicator material. Statistical analyzes showed the movement of PTEs in the sediment-root-stem-leaf system and identified the sources of PTEs, i.e., municipal wastewater treatment plants, the local food industry, and surface runoff. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Legacy of the Idrija Mine Twenty-Five Years after Closing: Is Mercury in the Water Column of the Gulf of Trieste Still an Environmental Issue?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10192; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910192 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 546
Abstract
Mercury (Hg) contamination in the Gulf of Trieste (northern Adriatic Sea) due to mining activity in Idrija (Slovenia) still represents an issue of environmental concern. The Isonzo/Soča River’s freshwater inputs have been identified as the main source of Hg into the Gulf, especially [...] Read more.
Mercury (Hg) contamination in the Gulf of Trieste (northern Adriatic Sea) due to mining activity in Idrija (Slovenia) still represents an issue of environmental concern. The Isonzo/Soča River’s freshwater inputs have been identified as the main source of Hg into the Gulf, especially following periods of medium-high discharge. This research aims to evaluate the occurrence and distribution of dissolved (DHg) and particulate (PHg) Hg along the water column in the northernmost sector of the Gulf, a shallow and sheltered embayment suitable for the accumulation of fine sediments. Sediment and water samples were collected under unperturbed and perturbed environmental conditions induced by natural and anthropogenic factors. Mercury in the sediments (0.77–6.39 µg g−1) and its relationship to grain size were found to be consistent with previous research focused on the entire Gulf, testifying to the common origin of the sediment. Results showed a notable variability of DHg (<LOD–149 ng L−1) and PHg (0.39–12.5 ng L−1) depending on the interaction between riverine and marine hydrological conditions. Mercury was found to be mainly partitioned in the suspended particles, especially following periods of high discharge, thus confirming the crucial role of the river inputs in regulating PHg distribution in the Gulf. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Biomonitoring of Hg0, Hg2 and Particulate Hg in a Mining Context Using Tree Barks+
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5191; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105191 - 13 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 902
Abstract
The biomonitoring of atmospheric mercury (Hg) is an important topic in the recent scientific literature given the cost-benefit advantage of obtaining indirect measurements of gaseous Hg using biological tissues. Lichens, mosses, and trees are the most commonly used organisms, with many standardized methods [...] Read more.
The biomonitoring of atmospheric mercury (Hg) is an important topic in the recent scientific literature given the cost-benefit advantage of obtaining indirect measurements of gaseous Hg using biological tissues. Lichens, mosses, and trees are the most commonly used organisms, with many standardized methods for some of them used across European countries by scientists and pollution regulators. Most of the species used the uptake of gaseous Hg (plant leaves), or a mixture of gaseous and particulate Hg (mosses and lichens), but no method is capable of differentiating between main atmospheric Hg phases (particulate and gaseous), essential in a risk assessment. The purpose of this work was to evaluate different uptake patterns of biological tissues in terms of atmospheric Hg compounds. To accomplish this, the feasibility of two plant tissues from a tree commonly found in urban environments has been evaluated for the biomonitoring of gaseous Hg species in a Hg mining environment. Sampling included leaves and barks from Platanus hispanica and particulate matter from the atmosphere of the urban area around Almadén (south-central Spain), while analytical determinations included data for total Hg concentrations in biological and geological samples, Hg speciation data and total gaseous Hg (TGM). The results allowed us to identify the main Hg compounds in leaves and bark tissues and in atmospheric particulate matter, finding that leaves bioaccumulated only gaseous Hg (Hg0 and Hg2+), preferably during daylight hours, whereas the barks accumulated a combination of TGM and particulate bound Hg (PBM) during the day and at night. Subsequent merging of the atmospheric Hg speciation data obtained from leaves and barks allowed indicative maps of the main sources of TGM and PBM emissions to be obtained, thereby perfectly delimiting the main TGM and PBM sources in the urban area around Almadén. This method complements TGM biomonitoring systems already tested with other urban trees, adding the detection of PBM emission sources and, therefore, biomonitoring all Hg species present in the atmosphere. Scenarios other than mining sites should be evaluated to determine the utility of this method for Hg biospeciation in the atmosphere. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Titile: The legacy of the Idrija mine twenty years after its closure: mercury in the water column of the Gulf of Trieste is still an environmental issue?

Authors: Stefano Covelli, Elena Pavoni, Elisa Petranich, Giorgio Fontolan, Sergio Signore

Back to TopTop