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Special Issue "Advances in Climate Change and Arctic Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2023 | Viewed by 1645

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Arja Rautio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Thule Institute and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, 90570 Oulu, Finland
Interests: arctic health; environmental health; social exclusion and Indigenous health and well-being
Dr. Khaled Abass
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Arctic Health Team, University of Oulu, 90570 Oulu, Finland
Interests: human and environmental health; contaminants; climate change; one-health
Dr. Anastasia Emelyanova
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Arctic Health Team, University of Oulu, 90570 Oulu, Finland
Interests: human health; demographics; healthy aging; social policy; one-health
Dr. Ulla Timlin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Arctic Health Team, University of Oulu, 90570 Oulu, Finland
Interests: mental wellness; indigenous health; good quality of life; one-health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The effects of rapid climate change are most striking in the circumpolar Arctic, shown in melting glaciers and sea ice, permafrost thaw, loss of land and changes in the environment, ecosystems, and human behavior and well-being. There are approximately seven million inhabitants in the Arctic, of whom around one million are Indigenous. Two thirds of Arctic residents live in settlements of more than 5000 people, and the same amount have their homes on the permafrost area. The Arctic is a sparely populated, but important part of the whole globe, as it reflects the immediate effects of climate warming, long-range transport of contaminants, the increase in human activities and migration, and existing and emerging infections, such as zoonotic diseases. The adaptation and mitigation strategies of local settlements and Indigenous peoples are essential for good living conditions, food safety, and quality of life. The multidisciplinary cross-sectorial pan-Arctic collaboration, co-producing knowledge and community-based participatory approach, are needed to reach these goals. The One Health paradigm is useful for improving the health and wellbeing of Arctic populations in seeking solutions to existing environmental threats and preparedness for future challenges and hazards.

Prof. Dr. Arja Rautio
Dr. Khaled Abass
Dr. Anastasia Emelyanova
Dr. Ulla Timlin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adaptation
  • arctic inhabitants
  • climate change
  • environmental contaminants
  • indigenous health
  • living conditions
  • one health
  • permafrost thaw
  • quality of life
  • vulnerable populations
  • zoonotic diseases

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Geographic and Ethnic Variations in Serum Concentrations of Legacy Persistent Organic Pollutants among Men in the Nenets Autonomous Okrug, Arctic Russia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1379; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031379 - 26 Jan 2022
Viewed by 957
Abstract
The overwhelming majority of Arctic biomonitoring studies in humans include either pregnant or non-pregnant women of reproductive age while little attention is paid to toxic compounds concentrations in men. This study contributes with information of the present amounts of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) [...] Read more.
The overwhelming majority of Arctic biomonitoring studies in humans include either pregnant or non-pregnant women of reproductive age while little attention is paid to toxic compounds concentrations in men. This study contributes with information of the present amounts of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in men living in Arctic Russia. We studied the serum concentrations of 11 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and 17 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and some of their metabolites in samples collected from 92 adult men (mean age 43 years) from seven different settlements in Nenets Autonomous Okrug (NAO). The median concentrations of individual PCB congeners increased in the order PCB 183, PCB 180, PCB 118, PCB 138, PCB 153. The concentrations of o, p′-DDD, p, p′-DDD, aldrin, mirex and 1,2,3,5-TCB were in most cases below the quantification limit. The observed concentrations of PCBs and chlorinated pesticides were in the same range as those found in similar groups of women of these territories, but lower than of men in other Arctic countries. However, significant geographic differences between the settlements were observed with exceptionally high concentrations of PCBs in the Islands group. The highest serum ∑PCBs and β-HCH levels were observed in adult males aged 60–78 years. We found significant variations in serum concentrations of POPs across settlements and ethnic groups with exceptionally high concentrations of PCBs among the residents of the Arctic islands. At the same time, our findings suggest a considerable decrease in serum concentration of POPs over the last decade. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Climate Change and Arctic Health)
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