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Advanced Approaches in Air Quality Monitoring and Modeling for Cultural Heritage and Works of Art

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020) | Viewed by 4231

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie, Parthenope University of Naples, 80133 Naples, Italy
Interests: atmospheric PM modelling; atmospheric PM characterization; ensemble modelling for air quality and meteorological applications; inverse analysis for source apportionment studies

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Guest Editor
Department of Science and Technology, Parthenope, University of Naples, 80143 Naples, Italy
Interests: air quality; PM characterization; indoor pollution; museum environment; environmental chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cultural heritage represents a weal for the whole of humanity. At present, many efforts have been made with the aim of restoring or preserving them from all factors that can cause them damage.

Environmental parameters such as humidity, temperature, illumination, and chemical substances—singly or in combination—play a crucial role in the degradation processes.

In particular, the correlation between cultural heritage conservation and air quality is a well-known aspect to consider when “preventive conservation” is under discussion: that idea concerns the evaluation of all factors that can determine damaging effects, in a museum or in storage, before the placement of exhibits and works of art.

For that reason, it is important to improve analytical methods and instruments for air quality studies and to adapt them to museum environments (i.e., reducing their volumes or their noise production), perform monitoring and air quality modeling campaigns with advanced or traditional methods, or assess the state of air quality inside and outside of museums (with the aim of creating reference databases and to verify standards law application) and, finally, to study works of art to obtain information on their storage conditions or exhibition.

This Special Issue is focused on monitoring and modeling environmental parameters (particularly air composition) in museum environments. Attention will be paid to papers discussing data or suggesting innovative methodologies and experimental approaches that will be useful for preventive conservation. Additionally, papers presenting works of art analyses aiming at providing information on the status of air quality will be considered.

Particularly, interdisciplinary works and multi-country collaborative research will be considered for publication.

Prof. Dr. RICCIO Angelo
Dr. CHIANESE Elena
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Indoor air quality assessment in museums and cultural heritage
  • Advanced and traditional approaches for the study (monitoring and modelling) of works of art exposure to air pollutants
  • Studies on the relation between air pollutants and exhibits degradation (indoor and outdoor)
  • Correlation between indoor and outdoor pollutants in cultural heritage.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1349 KiB  
Article
UV-C Irradiation as a Tool to Reduce Biofilm Growth on Pompeii Wall Paintings
by Paola Cennamo, Marta Ebbreo, Giovanni Quarta, Giorgio Trojsi, Alessandro De Rosa, Simona Carfagna, Paolo Caputo and Monica Martelli Castaldi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8392; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228392 - 13 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1697
Abstract
This study focuses on the experimentation of a method based on the use of UV-C irradiation to eliminate the biofilms present in a tomb located in the necropolis of Porta Nocera, in Pompeii. For this study, the autotrophic component of the biofilm was [...] Read more.
This study focuses on the experimentation of a method based on the use of UV-C irradiation to eliminate the biofilms present in a tomb located in the necropolis of Porta Nocera, in Pompeii. For this study, the autotrophic component of the biofilm was isolated in the laboratory, while, contemporarily, the characterization of the composition of the pigments of the frescoes took place on original fragments, which had already detached from the tomb and were examined in situ. These preliminary analyses were necessary for the recreation of test samples in the laboratory, which closely matched the original surfaces. Artificial biofilms were used for experimental exposure to UV-C radiation. The exposure to UV-C radiation was carried out at different distances for a fixed time interval. The effectiveness of the biocidal action was assessed by employing optical microscopy techniques, through a careful visual assessment of the area occupied by the biofilm on the different test samples, using a photographic survey, as well as by means of colorimetric measurements using spectrometric techniques. In order to obtain an additional parameter to evaluate the death rate of microorganism cultures exposed to the UV-C radiation, the concentrations of the photosynthetic pigments were also measured by spectrophotometry. Results showed that biofilms were completely eradicated by radiation, and no change in pigment color was observed. Full article
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18 pages, 4964 KiB  
Article
Measuring the Urban Particulate Matter Island Effect with Rapid Urban Expansion
by Yu Cao, Xiaoqian Fang, Jiayi Wang, Guoyu Li, Yu Cao and Yan Li
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5535; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155535 - 31 Jul 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2137
Abstract
Rapid urbanization has posed numerous negative impacts on the environment, including fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution. However, quantitative investigations of the PM2.5 concentration trends over an urban-rural gradient at the local level are still lacking. The urban particulate matter island [...] Read more.
Rapid urbanization has posed numerous negative impacts on the environment, including fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution. However, quantitative investigations of the PM2.5 concentration trends over an urban-rural gradient at the local level are still lacking. The urban particulate matter island (UPI) effect, representing the phenomenon that high particle concentrations in urban areas are gradually attenuated to surrounding areas, was adopted and modified in this paper to study the Hangzhou Bay area from 2000 to 2015. We found the following: (1) every urban area in the Hangzhou Bay area experienced rapid expansion, especially during 2000–2005; (2) more than half of the urban areas suffered UPI problems, and these urban areas had relatively high and stable UPI intensity (UPII) values, although the UPI footprint (UPIFP) values decreased with urban expansion; and (3) urban areas could be divided into three categories: plain areas, hilly areas and the junction of plains and hills, and the probability of the UPI effect varied significantly for different categories. This paper can compensate for the lack of research on the UPI effect at the local level and provide scientific evidence for air pollution control during urban agglomeration planning. Full article
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