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Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Mental Health Symptoms and Disorders

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health-Related Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 3 August 2024 | Viewed by 4554

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education, Ministro Petronio Portella Campus, Federal University of Piaui, Teresina 64049-550, Piaui, Brazil
Interests: resistance training; exercise physiology; physical activity; sport nutrition; sleep; athletic performance; exercise training prescription and health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Post-Graduation Program in Health Sciences, Santo Amaro University, Sao Paulo 04829-300, Brazil
2. Bipolar Disorder Program (PROMAN), Department and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo 04829-300, Brazil
Interests: mental disorders; psychological well-being; physical activity; sedentary behavior; depression; anxiety disorders; bipolar disorder; schizophrenia
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The rates of mental health symptoms (e.g., depression symptoms and anxiety symptoms) and mental disorders (e.g., major depression disorder and bipolar disorder) appear to be increasing among the younger generations in elite sport. Furthermore, mental disorders affect almost 30% of individuals across their lifespan and are among the largest contributors to the global burden of disease. Despite many advances in pharmacological and psychotherapy treatments for a range of mental disorders, there remains a substantial proportion of individuals who do not achieve remission from standard treatment. Physical activity, nutrition, and sleep are all widely regarded as fundamental aspects of human health, for both the body and the brain, and could be an important strategy to prevent and improve mental health in different populations (children, adult, elderly) and conditions (sedentary, trained, athletes). 

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Healthcare.

Prof. Dr. Fabricio Eduardo Rossi
Dr. Lucas Melo Neves
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • sedentary behavior
  • exercise
  • nutrition
  • diet
  • sleep
  • sports
  • athletes
  • mental disorders
  • mental health symptoms
  • psychological well-being
  • major depression disorders
  • anxiety disorders
  • bipolar disorders
  • schizophrenia

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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16 pages, 1228 KiB  
Article
Physical Activity Frequency and Depression in the Spanish Population
by Ángel Denche-Zamorano, David Ajenjo-Gomez, Damián Pereira-Payo, Carmen Galán-Arroyo, Alejandro Vega-Muñoz, Nicolás Contreras-Barraza, Miseldra Gil-Marín and Jorge Perez-Gomez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 14704; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192214704 - 9 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2084
Abstract
Introduction: Depression is a concerning mental health disorder. It is the first cause of inability worldwide, which entails high economic costs for the public system. Current evidence suggests that physical activity is an effective tool for the prevention and treatment of depressive symptoms. [...] Read more.
Introduction: Depression is a concerning mental health disorder. It is the first cause of inability worldwide, which entails high economic costs for the public system. Current evidence suggests that physical activity is an effective tool for the prevention and treatment of depressive symptoms. Objective: To examine the relationship between the cases of depressive symptoms and depression presented by the adult Spanish population and the days per week of physical activity and strength training that they perform. Design: It is a cross-sectional study with data from the European Health Survey of Spain 2020 (EESE 2020), consisting of 10,024 males and 11,126 females, between 18 and 84 years, which conformed the sample of 21,150 participants. Results: Depressive symptoms and depression were related to days of PA per week, PA frequency per week and strength training days per week (p < 0.001), depressive symptoms and depression were found to have higher prevalence in the inactive groups than in the active groups (p < 0.05); this phenomenon was found in both sexes and age groups. Conclusions: The prevalence of depressive symptoms and depression were associated with physical activity in the general population, by sex and by age group too. The prevalence of both were higher in the inactive population than in the active population of all ages and sexes. Future studies are required to confirm the relationship between PA and depression prevalence, in order to establish the scope of the effect of PA on depressive symptoms and depression. Full article
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11 pages, 2251 KiB  
Brief Report
Physically Inactive Undergraduate Students Exhibit More Symptoms of Anxiety, Depression, and Poor Quality of Life than Physically Active Students
by Endrew Eduardo Santos de Santana, Lucas Melo Neves, Karla Cardoso de Souza, Tassia Barcelos Mendes, Fabricio Eduardo Rossi, Ariana Aline da Silva, Rosemeire de Oliveira, Mauro Sergio Perilhão, Hamilton Roschel and Saulo Gil
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4494; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054494 - 3 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1979
Abstract
Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends at least 150 min of moderate or vigorous activity (MVPA) per week for health benefits. However, meeting WHO guidelines for physical activity has been shown to be a great challenge for general populations and it may [...] Read more.
Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends at least 150 min of moderate or vigorous activity (MVPA) per week for health benefits. However, meeting WHO guidelines for physical activity has been shown to be a great challenge for general populations and it may be even more difficult for undergraduate students due to elevated academic demand, thus negatively affecting general health status. Thus, this study investigated whether undergraduate students meeting WHO guidelines for physical activity show greater scores for symptoms of anxiety, depression, and poor quality of life than their counterparts not meeting guideline recommendations. Additionally, symptoms of anxiety, depression, and poor quality of life among academic areas were compared. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. The participants were recruited through messaging apps or institutional e-mail. The participants filled out an online consent form, questionnaires to assess demographic and academic characteristics, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, the Beck depression and anxiety inventory, and the short-form 36-item health survey questionnaire. The participants were classified as physically active (MVPA > 150 min/week) or inactive (MVPA < 150 min/week) according to WHO Guidelines. Results: A total of 371 individuals were included in the analysis. Physically inactive students demonstrated higher scores of depression (17.96 vs. 14.62; 95% CI: −5.81 to −0.86; p = 0.0083) than physically active ones. SF-36 analyses revealed that physically inactive students had lower values in mental (45.68 vs. 52.77; 95% CI: 2.10 to 12.06; p = 0.0054) and physical (59.37 vs. 67.14; 95% CI: 3.24 to 12.30; p = 0.0015) domains compared with physically active ones. As for SF-36 subscales, physically inactive students showed lower scores in function capacity (70.45 vs. 79.70; 95% CI: 4.27 to 14.49; p = 0.0003), mental health (45.57 vs. 55.60; 95% CI: 5.28 to 14.76; p < 0.0001), social aspects (48.91 vs. 57.69; 95%CI: 3.47 to 14.08; p = 0.0012), vitality (42.19 vs. 50.61; 95% CI: 3.47 to 13.35; p = 0.0009), pain (61.85 vs. 68.00; 95% CI: 1.27 to 11.02; p = 0.0135), and general health status (53.82 vs. 63.81; 95% CI: 5.21 to 14.75; p < 0.0001) than their physically active peers. Conclusions: The findings suggest that undergraduate students who do not meet WHO guidelines for physical activity display higher scores of anxiety, depression, and poor quality of life in comparison with their counterparts meeting physical activity guidelines. Collectively, these data suggest the need for academic institutions and policy makers to monitor and promote in-campus interventions to encourage physical activity. Full article
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