ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

The Associations between Eating Disorders and Psychological Health

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Behavioral and Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 6471

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Medicine, Long School of Medicine, UT Health San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
2. Audie Murphy Veterans Hospital, South Texas VA Health System, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
Interests: eating disorders; women’s health; aging; body image; psychological health and wellbeing; psychological interventions for eating pathology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Eating Disorders (ED) are serious health conditions with high rates of psychiatric comorbidity, medical complications, and elevated mortality risk, thus representing a significant public health problem. ED pathology, which occurs on a continuum and with heterogeneous etiology and presentation, is both predictive of psychological distress longitudinally and is associated with a poorer quality of life. Yet, more research is needed to better understand the intricacies of ED pathology and psychological health with regard to specific populations (especially those historically under-represented in the literature), etiology and trajectories of illness, common risk factors, and broader implications for prevention, treatment, and policy. 

This Special Issue will highlight cutting-edge research on the associations between ED pathology and psychological health. Of particular interest are studies that emphasize the following areas: (1) unique and shared risk factors in understudied or under-represented populations; (2) trajectories of ED pathology and psychological health; shared resilience factors related to ED pathology and psychological health; (3) novel examination of social, environmental, policy, or interactional factors relevant in comorbid disordered eating and psychopathology (e.g., weight stigma, intersectionality, and food insecurity); (4) intervention/prevention studies targeting EDs and comorbid psychopathology; (5) inter- and multi-disciplinary efforts to identify new understandings through collaboration; and 6) the application of new models or techniques to understand the associations between EDs and psychological health. 

Dr. Lisa Smith Kilpela
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eating disorders
  • eating pathology
  • mental health
  • psychological health
  • psychopathology
  • comorbidity
  • weight stigma
  • etiology
  • risk factors
  • behavioral interventions

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

12 pages, 303 KiB  
Article
Examining Teacher Concerns and Anxiety on the Implementation of a Universal Body Image Program
by Sarah G. Hidalgo, Taryn Henning, Francesca Gomez and Marisol Perez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(4), 419; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21040419 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 786
Abstract
In the past 30 years, there have been numerous positive body image and eating disorder prevention programs targeting youth developed for school-based settings. Frequently, teachers are used as interventionists to increase dissemination, decrease costs relative to researchers, and increase scalability. However, little is [...] Read more.
In the past 30 years, there have been numerous positive body image and eating disorder prevention programs targeting youth developed for school-based settings. Frequently, teachers are used as interventionists to increase dissemination, decrease costs relative to researchers, and increase scalability. However, little is known about teacher concerns and barriers that may hinder successful uptake and implementation. The current study recruited a total of 269 teachers who consented to implement a universal body image and appearance-related bullying and teasing prevention program in their classrooms as part of a randomized controlled trial. Teachers expressed some worry that they may say the wrong thing, and concern about feeling uncomfortable teaching the program due to their own body dissatisfaction. Teacher’s ethnicity, gender, years teaching, dieting behaviors and other weight control behaviors, and self-efficacy were not associated with concerns related to teaching the curriculum. Teachers with lower body esteem reported higher concerns and anxiety related to teaching a body image curriculum. In free response items, teachers worried about handling student comments that were beyond the scope of the curriculum. Teacher self-efficacy was the only variable associated with the number of program sessions implemented. Findings suggest avenues to increase implementation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Associations between Eating Disorders and Psychological Health)
17 pages, 892 KiB  
Article
Internalized Weight Stigma and Weight Discrimination: Associations with Quality of Life and Psychosocial Impairment in a Sample Living with Food Insecurity
by Sabrina E. Cuauro, Natalia Santos, Estefania Andrade, Anoushka W. Dani, Saivone N. Sanchious, Savannah C. Hooper and Carolyn Black Becker
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(24), 7147; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20247147 - 06 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1702
Abstract
Research suggests that experiencing weight discrimination is associated with a lower quality of life and poor psychological and physical health. However, much of the existing weight discrimination literature has neglected under-represented groups. Little is known about how the experience of weight discrimination affects [...] Read more.
Research suggests that experiencing weight discrimination is associated with a lower quality of life and poor psychological and physical health. However, much of the existing weight discrimination literature has neglected under-represented groups. Little is known about how the experience of weight discrimination affects quality of life and eating/weight-related psychosocial impairment in those living with food insecurity. The present study investigated the associations of weight discrimination and eating/weight-related psychosocial impairment and quality of life. We examined internalized weight stigma and several psychological indicators as potential mediators. Participants (N = 1085) who were recruited from a local food bank completed a questionnaire assessing food insecurity, weight discrimination, internalized weight stigma, eating disorder pathology, anxiety, depression, eating/weight-related psychosocial impairment, and quality of life. Overall, almost one in four participants reported experiencing weight discrimination. Our serial mediation models indicated that increased experiences of weight discrimination were associated with greater internalized weight stigma and psychopathology, which were in turn associated with lower quality of life and greater eating/weight-related psychosocial impairment. Thus, experiencing weight discrimination may negatively impact quality of life and eating/weight-related psychosocial impairment through its effect on mental health. It is imperative to address the negative effects of the widespread discrimination of people based on their weight. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Associations between Eating Disorders and Psychological Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 355 KiB  
Article
The Longitudinal Associations of Body Dissatisfaction with Health and Wellness Behaviors in Midlife and Older Women
by Lisa Smith Kilpela, Savannah C. Hooper, Casey L. Straud, Victoria B. Marshall, Christina L. Verzijl, Tiffany M. Stewart, Taylur T. Loera and Carolyn Black Becker
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(24), 7143; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20247143 - 05 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1729
Abstract
Emerging research suggests that body dissatisfaction (BD) is prevalent among midlife and older women (i.e., upwards of 70%). Cross-sectionally, BD is associated with myriad poor health and wellness outcomes (e.g., depression, disordered eating, bad nutrition) in midlife/older women. However, relatively few studies have [...] Read more.
Emerging research suggests that body dissatisfaction (BD) is prevalent among midlife and older women (i.e., upwards of 70%). Cross-sectionally, BD is associated with myriad poor health and wellness outcomes (e.g., depression, disordered eating, bad nutrition) in midlife/older women. However, relatively few studies have examined the longitudinal relations between BD and health outcomes in this population. This preliminary study investigated the longitudinal associations of BD with wellbeing and health-related quality of life (QOL) among midlife/older adult women over one year. Participants (n = 86, women aged 40–72 years, M = 51.49, SD = 7.34, 86% white) completed self-report measures of BD, psychosocial impairment, health behaviors, and QOL at baseline (T1) and 12-month follow-up (T2). A series of multiple linear regression models included T1 BD as the predictor variable of health outcomes at T2, covarying for T1 BMI and age in all models. BD was associated with greater negative emotions and psychosocial impairment, less physical activity enjoyment, and poorer physical, psychological, and social QOL one year later. Findings suggest that BD is associated with negative consequences for women across the lifespan (ƒ2 ranges = 0.06–0.60). Future research investigating BD as a unique, modifiable risk factor for health outcomes among diverse samples of midlife/older women is warranted. Targeting BD in interventions may improve health indices beyond eating disorders for this population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Associations between Eating Disorders and Psychological Health)

Other

Jump to: Research

11 pages, 866 KiB  
Brief Report
Digital Mental Health Interventions: Differences in Diet Culture Intervention Framing
by Hannah F. Fitterman-Harris, Gabrielle G. Davis, Samantha P. Bedard, Claire E. Cusack and Cheri A. Levinson
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21010024 - 23 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1821
Abstract
Diet culture is a societal norm that ranks thin bodies as superior to other body types and has been associated with negative outcomes, such as eating disorders. Wellness has evolved into a term that is often used to promote diet culture messages. One [...] Read more.
Diet culture is a societal norm that ranks thin bodies as superior to other body types and has been associated with negative outcomes, such as eating disorders. Wellness has evolved into a term that is often used to promote diet culture messages. One possible way to combat diet culture is through single-session, digital mental health interventions (DMHIs), which allow for increased access to brief public health treatments. The framing of DMHIs is critical to ensure that the target population is reached. Participants (N = 397) were enrolled in a single-session DMHI, which was framed as either a Diet Culture Intervention (n = 201) or a Wellness Resource (n = 196). Baseline group differences in eating disorder pathology, body image, weight stigma concerns, fat acceptance, and demographic characteristics were analyzed. Across groups, participants reported moderately high eating disorder pathology, low-to-moderate levels of body dissatisfaction, moderate levels of fat acceptance, and either very low or very high weight stigma concerns. Participants in the Diet Culture Intervention group reported higher levels of fat acceptance than those in the Wellness Resource group (p < 0.001). No other framing group differences were identified, though post hoc analyses revealed differences based on recruitment source (i.e., social media versus undergraduate research portal). This study found that framing a DMHI as targeting diet culture or as a Wellness Resource can result in the successful recruitment of individuals at risk of disordered eating. Framing a DMHI as a Wellness Resource may increase recruitment of individuals with low levels of fat acceptance, which may be particularly important for dismantling diet culture, disordered eating, and weight stigma concerns. Future research should assess DMHI framing in other populations, such as men and adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Associations between Eating Disorders and Psychological Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop