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Advances in Primary Health Care and Community Health

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 June 2025 | Viewed by 4287

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Nursing Department, School of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Podiatry, Complutense University, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: public health; community health care; primary health care; lifestyle; nursing care; vaccines; nursing process; nursing education research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nursing Department, School of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Podiatry, Complutense University, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: public health; community health care; vaccines; epidemiology; biostatistics; nursing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the beginning of the global health emergency generated by the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, numerous research groups have focused their work on evaluating aspects related to the pandemic itself (vaccines, transmission mechanisms, detection tests, symptom control, etc.). As a result of this research work, a large number of publications related to the pandemic have been produced in recent times. Although this new research focus has been necessary and positive, the priority of researching aspects related to the current emergency should not make us forget the importance of continuing research into other relevant areas of knowledge, as is the case here, in health sciences and public health protection, with the aim of continuing to generate scientific advances in this field. In this sense, many research groups have continued to develop, in many cases with significant limitations and difficulties, but with the required scientific rigor, their lines of research during this period of pandemic. This Special Issue focuses on this research. Specifically, we want to make visible the research carried out in aspects related to community health during the pandemic period, so we welcome original articles and critical reviews developed with this approach, in this period.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Healthcare.

Prof. Dr. Francisco Javier Pérez-Rivas
Prof. Dr. María Julia Ajejas Bazán
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • public health
  • community health care
  • primary health care
  • health promotion
  • lifestyle
  • environmental health
  • health care sciences and services
  • chronic disease

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 754 KiB  
Article
Factors Influencing eHealth Literacy among Spanish Primary Healthcare Users: Cross-Sectional Study
by David García-García, María Julia Ajejas Bazán and Francisco Javier Pérez-Rivas
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15497; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315497 - 23 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1756
Abstract
Background: Adequate eHealth literacy levels empower people to make informed decisions, enhancing their autonomy. The current study assessed a group using primary care services for their eHealth literacy and examined its relationship with sociodemographic characteristics. Methods: Adult patients in need of primary care [...] Read more.
Background: Adequate eHealth literacy levels empower people to make informed decisions, enhancing their autonomy. The current study assessed a group using primary care services for their eHealth literacy and examined its relationship with sociodemographic characteristics. Methods: Adult patients in need of primary care nursing services participated in this cross-sectional study, which was carried out in a healthcare center in the Madrid region of Spain. Through systematic random sampling, 166 participants were chosen for the study. The eHealth Literacy Questionnaire was used to assess eHealth literacy (eHLQ). Results: The studied population showed higher eHealth literacy scores in dimensions 2 (“understanding of health concepts and language”) and 4 (“feel safe and in control”); the lowest scores were recorded for dimensions 1 (“using technology to process health information”), 3 (“ability to actively engage with digital services”), and 7 (“digital services that suit individual needs”). People with completed secondary education and a better-perceived health status who were younger and employed showed a higher level of eHealth literacy. Conclusions: The findings advance our knowledge of the variables affecting eHealth literacy. We may be able to understand patients’ needs and provide them with greater support if we can pinpoint the areas where they demonstrate the lowest eHealth literacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Primary Health Care and Community Health)
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14 pages, 457 KiB  
Article
Health Literacy and Its Sociodemographic Predictors: A Cross-Sectional Study of a Population in Madrid (Spain)
by David García-García and Francisco Javier Pérez-Rivas
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(18), 11815; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191811815 - 19 Sep 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1971
Abstract
Background: Health literacy enhances a population’s self-care capacity and helps to reduce health inequalities. This work examines the health literacy of a population attending primary care services and explores its relationship with sociodemographic factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted at a healthcare center [...] Read more.
Background: Health literacy enhances a population’s self-care capacity and helps to reduce health inequalities. This work examines the health literacy of a population attending primary care services and explores its relationship with sociodemographic factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted at a healthcare center in the Madrid region (Spain), involved adult patients requiring primary care nursing services. One hundred and sixty-six participants were recruited via systematic random sampling. Health literacy was measured using the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ). Results: The studied population showed higher health literacy scores for literacy dimensions 1 (feeling understood and supported by healthcare providers) and 4 (social support for health); the lowest scores were recorded for dimensions 5 (appraisal of health information) and 8 (ability to find good health information). People with a better perceived health status showed a higher level of health literacy. People over 65 years of age, those with an incomplete secondary education, and those who were unemployed returned lower scores for several literacy dimensions. Conclusions: The results contribute to our understanding of the factors that influence health literacy. Identifying the areas in which patients show the poorest health literacy may help us comprehend their needs and better support them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Primary Health Care and Community Health)
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