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Rising to the Healthy Ageing Challenge: Co-production with Older People and Business

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 4681

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
Interests: ageing; health inequalities; health behavior; cancer screening; social isolation; loneliness
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
Interests: healthy ageing; well-being; caregiving; dementia care; ethnic minority ageing; rural ageing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Changes to the structure of the population, driven by lower fertility rates and higher life expectancy, create both opportunities for and challenges to the way we live our lives. Remaining healthy for a longer period of time is central to ensuring a better quality of life for individuals and to supporting their capacity to work, volunteer, or care for others for longer, if they choose to do so. Developing supportive environments for ageing across social, health and economic domains require solutions that are co-produced with older people and with organisations, such as, business, social enterprise, and the third sector in collaboration with local and national government. The Healthy Ageing Challenge (Healthy ageing—UKRI) enables research, business and older people to come together to develop and deliver products and services, supported by the Social Behavioural and Design Research Programme (Home—SBDRP | Stirling University (ageing-sbdrp.co.uk)). The goal of this Special Issue is to identify examples of the meaningful co-design and co-production of solutions to address the issues that are important to people as they age. These include how and where we live our lives across a range of domains encompassing housing, changing work patterns, physical activity, retail, hospitality, and culture.

Dr. Elaine Douglas
Prof. Dr. Catherine Hennessy
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • population ageing
  • co-design
  • co-production
  • social
  • health
  • economy
  • work
  • culture
  • housing
  • retail

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 359 KiB  
Article
Community Transport’s Dual Role as a Transport and a Social Scheme: Implications for Policy
by Léa Ravensbergen and Tim Schwanen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(4), 422; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21040422 - 30 Mar 2024
Viewed by 948
Abstract
Community transport comprises diverse local, not-for-profit, and primarily volunteer-run transport schemes that operate across the United Kingdom. These schemes support the travel needs of thousands of people, most of whom are older, live in rural areas, and have few other transport options. Further, [...] Read more.
Community transport comprises diverse local, not-for-profit, and primarily volunteer-run transport schemes that operate across the United Kingdom. These schemes support the travel needs of thousands of people, most of whom are older, live in rural areas, and have few other transport options. Further, this transport sector is unique in that most schemes are designed, created, and run by older people themselves. And yet, community transport has thus far received relatively little attention in both policy and research. Using semi-structured interviews with community transport providers in Oxfordshire, this paper proposes community transport as a practice guided by phronesis and argues that it has been made to hold a dual role as both a transport and a social scheme. The transport it provides is unique in being made low-cost, flexible, and functionally accessible. It has also been made into a social scheme as it helps those with few other options, provides benefits that extend beyond the transport realm, and fosters community. Though this dual role means that community transport has many cross-sectoral benefits, this type of service provision is found to be overlooked in both national and local policy, which has enabled the constitutive role of phronesis in community transport. Given this, there are challenges ahead for the sector in both ensuring its sustainability and maintaining its ability to respond closely to users’ needs. Full article
17 pages, 4212 KiB  
Article
Othering Older People’s Housing: Gaming Ageing to Support Future-Planning
by Vikki McCall, Alasdair C. Rutherford, Alison Bowes, Sadhana Jagannath, Mary Njoki, Martin Quirke, Catherine M. Pemble, Melanie Lovatt, Lisa Davison, Katie Maginn, Pat Scrutton, Ro Pengelly and Joan Gibson
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(3), 304; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21030304 - 05 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1316
Abstract
The ‘othering’ of ageing is linked to an integrated process of ageism and hinders planning for the future for both individuals and practitioners delivering housing and health services. This paper aims to explore how creative interventions can help personalise, exchange knowledge and lead [...] Read more.
The ‘othering’ of ageing is linked to an integrated process of ageism and hinders planning for the future for both individuals and practitioners delivering housing and health services. This paper aims to explore how creative interventions can help personalise, exchange knowledge and lead to system changes that tackle the ‘othering’ of ageing. The Designing Homes for Healthy Cognitive Ageing (DesHCA) project offers new and creative insights through an innovative methodology utilising ‘serious games’ with a co-produced tool called ‘Our House’ that provides insights into how to deliver housing for older people for ageing well in place. In a series of playtests with over 128 people throughout the UK, the findings show that serious games allow interaction, integration and understanding of how ageing affects people professionally and personally. The empirical evidence highlights that the game mechanisms allowed for a more in-depth and nuanced consideration of ageing in a safe and creative environment. These interactions and discussions enable individuals to personalise and project insights to combat the ‘othering’ of ageing. However, the solutions are restrained as overcoming the consequences of ageism is a societal challenge with multilayered solutions. The paper concludes that serious gaming encourages people to think differently about the concept of healthy ageing—both physically and cognitively—with the consideration of scalable and creative solutions to prepare for ageing in place. Full article
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18 pages, 967 KiB  
Article
Theoretical Models of Collaborative Partnerships in Arts-Health Care Practices for Older Adults
by Dohee Lee and Masood Masoodian
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(19), 6888; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20196888 - 06 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1371
Abstract
Although research investigating collaborative partnerships with older adults has been slow to develop, promoting user involvement and co-production is gaining interest in aging studies, with the aim of improving interactions between the different stakeholders involved, and toward the more effective delivery of care [...] Read more.
Although research investigating collaborative partnerships with older adults has been slow to develop, promoting user involvement and co-production is gaining interest in aging studies, with the aim of improving interactions between the different stakeholders involved, and toward the more effective delivery of care provisions and better community life for aging people. This is based on existing evidence that improved dynamics within collaborative and mutual learning processes can enhance the integration of new practices at different levels by generating novel creative approaches and practice frameworks for the delivery of quality care for older adults. This article presents the findings from a series of narrative interviews conducted with different stakeholders involved in arts-health practices in Finland and South Korea. Focusing on empirical perspectives of these stakeholders on arts-health practices—from planning to assessment—this study identifies vital components of co-producing and co-delivering arts-health practices for older adults and highlights the importance of utilizing their late-life creativity as active partners in such practices across cultural contexts. In addition to identifying three central stages of developing arts-health practices, two theocratical models are proposed to provide structural support for collaborative partnerships in arts-health practices, with the aim of promoting holistic care provisions for aging people through such practices. Full article
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