Special Issue "Integrated Effect of Climate and Land Use on Hydrology and Soil Erosion"

A special issue of Hydrology (ISSN 2306-5338).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Arun Mondal
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Earth, Ocean and Environment, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
Interests: land use change modeling; soil erosion; climate change; water balance; flood inundation modeling; snow cover change; remote sensing and GIS

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Hydrology is mainly focused on evaluating the integrated and individual effects of climate and land use on hydrology using contemporary and appropriate techniques to estimate future predictions. The main intention of this issue is to present precise and novel information regarding variations of the hydrological characteristics due to the effect of climate and land use changes. The availability, distribution, and exchange of water through the land–atmosphere interface is one of the crucial factors that determines adequate sustenance. Recent developments in the field of remote sensing satellite data and in situ observations have led to an improved understanding of the hydrological processes. Climate change modifies intensity and time of precipitation, stream flow, evapotranspiration, soil erosion, and soil moisture. Land use change alters and transforms the land, which leads to changes in the properties of the land surface and eventually modifies water exchange of the land–atmosphere system.

Special focus is given to hybrid methods, modeling, and recent advancements in the fields of spatiotemporal variation in the water balance, precipitation, and land use changes involving remote sensing and various statistical analysis. This Special Issue includes but is not limited to a wide range of topics, such as:

  • Climate change impacts on extremes like flood and drought;
  • Time series analysis of hydrometeorological parameters;
  • Watershed modeling using remote sensing products or situ observations;
  • Land use change impact on sediment and future water balance;
  • Impact of climate on soil erosion and modeling;
  • Flood modelling and management;
  • Climate change and evapotranspiration, snow, soil moisture;
  • Climate change impact of available water resources and agricultural production;
  • Climate change and land use change impact on groundwater recharge and modeling;
  • The orbital effect of forcing of climate for global hydrology.

Dr. Arun Mondal
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Hydrology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Land use change
  • Water resources
  • Soil erosion
  • Flood
  • Agricultural production

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Assessing the Impact of Land Use and Climate Change on Surface Runoff Response Using Gridded Observations and SWAT+
Hydrology 2021, 8(1), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology8010048 - 17 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 740
Abstract
The Anthropocene period is characterised by a general demographic shift from rural communities to urban centres that transform the predominantly wild global landscape into mostly cultivated land and cities. In addition to climate change, there are increased uncertainties in the water balance and [...] Read more.
The Anthropocene period is characterised by a general demographic shift from rural communities to urban centres that transform the predominantly wild global landscape into mostly cultivated land and cities. In addition to climate change, there are increased uncertainties in the water balance and these feedbacks cannot be modelled accurately due to scarce or incomplete in situ data. In African catchments with limited current and historical climate data, precise modelling of potential runoff regimes is difficult, but a growing number of model applications indicate that useful simulations are feasible. In this study, we used the new generation of soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) dubbed SWAT+ to assess the viability of using high resolution gridded data as an alternative to station observations to investigate surface runoff response to continuous land use change and future climate change. Simultaneously, under two representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), six regional climate models (RCMs) from the Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment Program (CORDEX) and their ensemble were evaluated for model skill and systematic biases and the best performing model was selected. The gridded data predicted streamflow accurately with a Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency greater than 0.89 in both calibration and validation phases. The analysis results show that further conversion of grasslands and forests to agriculture and urban areas doubled the runoff depth between 1984 and 2016. Climate projections predict a decline in March–May rainfall and an increase in the October–December season. Mean temperatures are expected to rise by about 1.3–1.5 °C under RCP4.5 and about 2.6–3.5 °C under RCP8.5 by 2100. Compared to the 2010–2016 period, simulated surface runoff response to climate change showed a decline under RCP4.5 and an increase under RCP8.5. In contrast, the combine effects of land use change and climate change simulated a steady increase in surface runoff under both scenarios. This suggests that the land use influence on the surface runoff response is more significant than that of climate change. The study results highlight the reliability of gridded data as an alternative to instrumental measurements in limited or missing data cases. More weight should be given to improving land management practices to counter the imminent increase in the surface runoff to avoid an increase in non-point source pollution, erosion, and flooding in the urban watersheds. Full article
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Article
Contemporary Long-Term Trends in Water Discharge, Suspended Sediment Load, and Erosion Intensity in River Basins of the North Caucasus Region, SW Russia
Hydrology 2021, 8(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology8010028 - 07 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1062
Abstract
For the first time, contemporary trends in water discharge, suspended sediment load, and the intensity of overall erosion in the river basins of the North Caucasus region, as one of Russia’s most agriculturally developed geographic areas, were identified. The study was carried out [...] Read more.
For the first time, contemporary trends in water discharge, suspended sediment load, and the intensity of overall erosion in the river basins of the North Caucasus region, as one of Russia’s most agriculturally developed geographic areas, were identified. The study was carried out using monitoring data of the Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring of the country for 21 rivers by comparing two periods: 1963–1980 and 2008–2017. According to the study’s results, trends of an increase in the mean annual water discharge (by 2–97%) and the essential reduction in its intra-annual variability have been found in most of the studied rivers. On the contrary, the trends of reduction in annual suspended sediment load and the intensity of erosion in the river basins were identified in most of the study region. Their most essential and statistically significant decreases (by 47–94%) were recorded within the Stavropol Upland, which several decades ago was considered one of the most erosion-dangerous territories of the entire country, as well as in some river basins of the central part of the Greater Caucasus’s northern slope (by 17–94%). The changes in climate (reducing the depth of soil freezing and meltwater runoff on the soil) and land use/cover (reduction of acreage and load (pressure) of agricultural machinery on the soil, reducing livestock on pastures, and the transfer of water from the neighboring, more full-flowing rivers) are considered the leading causes of the aforementioned trends. The findings will contribute to solving some economic and environmental problems of both the region and adjacent territories and water areas. Full article
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Article
Impact of Urbanization on Large Wood Sizes and Associated Recruitment Zones
Hydrology 2020, 7(4), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7040089 - 16 Nov 2020
Viewed by 629
Abstract
Although the presence of large wood (LW) has long been recognized to enhance watershed function, land use impact on LW remains poorly understood. Using a series of six watersheds, we investigate the relationships between LW recruitment zones, LW size, and LW jam occurrence [...] Read more.
Although the presence of large wood (LW) has long been recognized to enhance watershed function, land use impact on LW remains poorly understood. Using a series of six watersheds, we investigate the relationships between LW recruitment zones, LW size, and LW jam occurrence and land use. Although the results in general show urban land use to severely limit LW, they also stress that agricultural land use may be positively correlated to LW. Occurrence of potentially productive LW recruitment zones is nevertheless best correlated to total forest land cover and forested riparian area. However, the lack of mature forest due to previous widespread deforestation linked to historical agricultural land use is likely a limiting legacy effect. Since the pattern of land use seen in the study area is typical of much of the developed world, our results suggest the limiting of LW may be a major way in which watersheds are impacted in many regions. Accordingly, reintroduction of LW represents a significant opportunity to restore watersheds on a broad scale. Specifically, we propose a mix of passive conservation and active restoration of LW sources and that the targeting of these tactics be planned using the spatial analysis methods of this study. Full article
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