Special Issue "Abiotic Stress Responses of Plants"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Csengele Barta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Missouri Western State University, St. Joseph, MO 64507, USA
Interests: photosynthesis; secondary plant metabolism; biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs); abiotic and biotic stress; oxidative stress; antioxidants; invasive plant species; allelopathic mechanisms;

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Abiotic stresses present a substantial constraint for horticulture via their direct negative impact on plants, altering cellular metabolism and affecting plants’ interactions with their environments. Stress responses depend on the severity, duration and frequency of exposure, combination with other stresses, plant morpho-anatomical and adaptive traits, and phenology. While some species are well equipped with elaborate defense and regulatory strategies that allow them to withstand and adapt to some stress conditions, others are vulnerable. Stress-induced cellular damages are often associated with an uncontrolled production of toxic reactive oxygen species, which rapidly induce localized or systemic oxidative damage, ultimately limiting plant growth, development and reproduction. A warmer and drier climate as a possible consequence of global warming is likely to exert additional pressures on plant tolerance and adaptive responses, with broader implications for horticulture, plant conservation, soil management, landscape design and restoration, and others.

A rapidly increasing population and resulting demand for high-yield, nutritious, stress resistant crops call for current research to support production practices. We invite research, review, technical and modeling contributions, focusing on the impact of abiotic stress on edible or non-food plants, of high value for horticultural applications, in a broader context.

Dr. Csengele Barta
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

abiotic stresses (drought; water-logging; high temperature stress; freezing; high intensity visible and UV radiation; nutrient deficiency; heavy metal toxicity; high salinity; ozone pollution); climate change; stress tolerance and adaptive responses; photosynthesis; photoinhibition; the role of phytohormones in plant stress responses; oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS); antioxidants; nutrition; water use efficiency (WUE); species conservation; competition and invasive species control; genetic diversity; genetic engineering; plant propagation; landscape design and restoration; soil management; automation and robotics in sustainable horticulture

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Securing Horticulture in a Changing Climate—A Mini Review
Horticulturae 2019, 5(3), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5030056 - 02 Aug 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
(1) Background: Climate change is on the rise due to continuous greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic activities ever since the industrial revolution. Changing weather conditions are likely to have consequences for horticulture. (2) Objective and Methods: A short literature review was conducted, gathering [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Climate change is on the rise due to continuous greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic activities ever since the industrial revolution. Changing weather conditions are likely to have consequences for horticulture. (2) Objective and Methods: A short literature review was conducted, gathering findings on climate change and the impacts on the yield and product quality of special crops. (3) Results: Global warming will result in elevated temperatures and CO2 concentrations in all seasons. Extreme weather events such as heat waves are also on the increase. In vegetables, physiological processes such as vernalization and winter chilling strongly rely on temperature. Therefore, heat stress may cause irregularities in yield production and planning the harvest. For fruit crops, frost poses a risk that is enhanced through climate change, as does a lack of chilling, as cold temperatures in the winter are required for flowering in the spring. Abiotic disorders in horticulture are also related to changing temperatures and humidity. The nutritional quality of special crops may be threatened by increasing rates of plant development and premature ripening at high temperatures. Quality traits such as sugars, acids, or antioxidant capacity may also shift as well. (4) Conclusions: Adapting to these new climate conditions means developing new climate-resilient varieties to maintain high production levels with superior quality. In this mini review, cultivation measures to mitigate adverse climate impacts are also discussed. Current developments and recent findings are presented, pointing out further steps toward adaptation and sustainable production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abiotic Stress Responses of Plants)
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Open AccessReview
Understanding the Impacts of Crude Oil and its Induced Abiotic Stresses on Agrifood Production: A Review
Horticulturae 2019, 5(2), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5020047 - 23 Jun 2019
Abstract
In many parts of the world, the agricultural sector is faced with a number of challenges including those arising from abiotic environmental stresses which are the key factors responsible for most reductions in agrifood production. Crude oil contamination, an abiotic stress factor and [...] Read more.
In many parts of the world, the agricultural sector is faced with a number of challenges including those arising from abiotic environmental stresses which are the key factors responsible for most reductions in agrifood production. Crude oil contamination, an abiotic stress factor and a common environmental contaminant, at toxic levels has negative impacts on plants. Although various attempts have been made to demonstrate the impact of abiotic stresses on crops, the underlying factors responsible for the effects of crude oil and its induced abiotic stresses on the composition of the stressed plants are poorly understood. Hence, this review provides an in-depth examination of the: (1) effect of petroleum hydrocarbons on plants; (2) impact of abiotic environmental stresses on crop quality; (3) mechanistic link between crude oil stress and its induced abiotic stresses; as well as (4) mode of action/plant response mechanism to these induced stresses. The paper clearly reveals the implications of crude oil-induced abiotic stresses arising from the soil-root-plant route and from direct application on plant leaves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abiotic Stress Responses of Plants)
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