Water Stable Isotope Signatures in the Ice of Antarctica

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Cryosphere".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 5652

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing St, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, UK
Interests: climatology; cryosphere; water stable isotopes; ice cores; climate modeling

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Guest Editor
Laboratorio de Análisis Isotópico, Universidad Andrés Bello, Viña del Mar 2531015, Chile
Interests: geology; geochemistry; stable isotopes; glaciology

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Guest Editor
Department of Meteorology and Geophysics, University of Vienna, Althanstraße 14, 1090 Wien, Vienna
Interests: stable water isotopes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water stable isotopes recorded in Antarctic ice cores are key elements for reconstructing past climates. They have traditionally been used to infer past temperatures, for example, at millennial timescales, using modern continental-wide isotopic thermometers. This relationship results from the Clausius–Clapeyron equation, relating the condensation temperature with its water stable isotopic content, along the history of an air mass. However, precipitation falling to the ground in Antarctica may be prone to air–snow exchanges and post-depositional effects, such as diffusion and metamorphism effects, which modify the original signature. Additionally, the isotopic thermometer has been shown to vary at local-to-continental scales, as well as at decadal-to-millennial time scales. Precipitated water stable isotopes may be driven not only by thermodynamic but dynamic processes; for instance, linked to the origin of the air masses, or within the boundary layer, distorting the relationship between condensation and surface air temperatures.

The aim of this Special Issue is to assemble a suite of papers providing the latest findings about the interpretation of water stable isotope records from Antarctic ice cores and infer the features of past climates using such signatures. We therefore invite authors to submit any of their work related to the better quantification of effects impacting ice core water stable isotope records, mainly through the use of models; from simple 1D models to 3D general circulation models, or work providing results from analyses of water stable isotope records from Antarctic firn-to-deep ice cores, improving our knowledge of recent-to-deep past climates.

Dr. Sentia Goursaud
Dr. Francisco Fernandoy
Dr. Marina Dütsch
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Water stable isotopes
  • Antarctica
  • Ice cores
  • Past climates
  • Isotopic thermometer
  • Moisture sources
  • Deposition and post-deposition effects

Published Papers (3 papers)

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12 pages, 4600 KiB  
Article
Decadal Scale Variability of Larsen Ice Shelf Melt Captured by Antarctic Peninsula Ice Core
by B. Daniel Emanuelsson, Elizabeth R. Thomas, Jack D. Humby and Diana O. Vladimirova
Geosciences 2022, 12(9), 344; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences12090344 - 16 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1421
Abstract
In this study, we used the stable water isotope record (δ18O) from an ice core drilled in Palmer Land, southern Antarctic Peninsula (AP). Utilizing δ18O we identified two climate regimes during the satellite era. During the 1979–1998 positive interdecadal [...] Read more.
In this study, we used the stable water isotope record (δ18O) from an ice core drilled in Palmer Land, southern Antarctic Peninsula (AP). Utilizing δ18O we identified two climate regimes during the satellite era. During the 1979–1998 positive interdecadal Pacific oscillation (IPO) phase, a low-pressure system north of the Weddell Sea drove southeasterly winds that are associated with an increase in warm air mass intrusion onto the Larsen shelves, which melted and a decreased sea ice concentration in the Weddell Sea/increase in the Bellingshausen Sea. This climate setting is associated with anomaly low δ18O values (compared with the latter IPO period). There is significantly more melt along the northern AP ice shelf margins and on the Larsen D and southern Larsen C during the 1979–1998 IPO positive phase. The IPO positive climatic setting was coincidental with the Larsen A ice shelf collapse. In contrast, during the IPO negative phase (1999–2011), northerly winds caused a reduction in sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea/Drake Passage region. Moreover, a Southern Ocean north of the Weddell Sea high-pressure system caused low-latitude warm humid air over the tip and east of the AP, a setting that is associated with increased northern AP snowfall, a high δ18O anomaly, and less prone to Larsen ice shelf melt. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Stable Isotope Signatures in the Ice of Antarctica)
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23 pages, 36982 KiB  
Article
Short-Term Meteorological and Environmental Signals Recorded in a Firn Core from a High-Accumulation Site on Plateau Laclavere, Antarctic Peninsula
by Kirstin Hoffmann-Abdi, Francisco Fernandoy, Hanno Meyer, Johannes Freitag, Thomas Opel, Joseph R. McConnell and Christoph Schneider
Geosciences 2021, 11(10), 428; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11100428 - 15 Oct 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2590 | Correction
Abstract
High-accumulation sites are crucial for understanding the patterns and mechanisms of climate and environmental change in Antarctica since they allow gaining high-resolution proxy records from firn and ice. Here, we present new glacio- and isotope-geochemical data at sub-annual resolution from a firn core [...] Read more.
High-accumulation sites are crucial for understanding the patterns and mechanisms of climate and environmental change in Antarctica since they allow gaining high-resolution proxy records from firn and ice. Here, we present new glacio- and isotope-geochemical data at sub-annual resolution from a firn core retrieved from an ice cap on Plateau Laclavere (LCL), northern Antarctic Peninsula, covering the period 2012–2015. The signals of two volcanic eruptions and two forest fire events in South America could be identified in the non-sea-salt sulphur and black carbon records, respectively. Mean annual snow accumulation on LCL amounts to 2500 kg m−2 a−1 and exhibits low inter-annual variability. Time series of δ18O, δD and d excess show no seasonal cyclicity, which may result from (1) a reduced annual temperature amplitude due to the maritime climate and (2) post-depositional processes. The firn core stratigraphy indicates strong surface melt on LCL during austral summers 2013 and 2015, likely related to large-scale warm-air advection from lower latitudes and temporal variations in sea ice extent in the Bellingshausen-Amundsen Sea. The LCL ice cap is a highly valuable natural archive since it captures regional meteorological and environmental signals as well as their connection to the South American continent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Stable Isotope Signatures in the Ice of Antarctica)
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3 pages, 782 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Hoffmann-Abdi et al. Short-Term Meteorological and Environmental Signals Recorded in a Firn Core from a High-Accumulation Site on Plateau Laclavere, Antarctic Peninsula. Geosciences 2021, 11, 428
by Kirstin Hoffmann-Abdi, Francisco Fernandoy, Hanno Meyer, Johannes Freitag, Thomas Opel, Joseph R. McConnell and Christoph Schneider
Geosciences 2023, 13(8), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences13080237 - 8 Aug 2023
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Abstract
The authors would like to make the following corrections to the published article [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Stable Isotope Signatures in the Ice of Antarctica)
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