Special Issue "Submarine Landslides – Assessing the Stability of Submerged Slopes"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Hazards".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Morelia Urlaub
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre of Ocean Research Kiel, Germany
Interests: marine geohazards; submarine landslides; volcanic flank collapse; subsurface fluid flow

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Analyzing the stability of natural submarine slopes is often challenging due to the inaccessibility of critical areas, limited data coverage, and uncertainties in potential trigger mechanisms. Nevertheless, knowing the stability of submarine slopes is essential for many applications. The aim of this Special Issue is to collate various innovative approaches that overcome these difficulties and make use of available data sets to assess the stability of submerged slopes. Typical data sets could include, but are not limited to, geophysical imaging, sediment samples, laboratory experiments, in situ measurements and monitoring. Case studies, as well as theoretical solutions, are welcome. This Special Issue provides an outlet for rapid, open access publication of peer-reviewed studies that use marine data sets to assess submarine slope stability.

Dr. Morelia Urlaub
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Slope stability analysis
  • Submarine landslides
  • Numerical modeling
  • Seafloor infrastructure
  • Natural submarine slopes
  • Sediment mechanics
  • Continental slope

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Morphological Variability of Submarine Mass Movements in the Tectonically–Controlled Calabro–Tyrrhenian Continental Margin (Southern Italy)
Geosciences 2019, 9(1), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9010043 - 15 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The analysis of high resolution morpho–bathymetric data on the Calabro Tyrrhenian continental margin (Southern Italy) enabled us to identify several morphological features originated by mass–wasting processes, including shallow gullies, shelf–indenting canyons and landslides. Specifically, we focus our attention on submarine landslides occurring from [...] Read more.
The analysis of high resolution morpho–bathymetric data on the Calabro Tyrrhenian continental margin (Southern Italy) enabled us to identify several morphological features originated by mass–wasting processes, including shallow gullies, shelf–indenting canyons and landslides. Specifically, we focus our attention on submarine landslides occurring from the coast down to −1700 m and affecting variable areas from thousands of square meters up to few tens of square kilometers. These landslides also show a large variability of geomorphic features which seems strictly related to the physiographic/morphological domains where the landslide formed. Tectonically–controlled scarps and canyon flanks are typically characterized by several coalescent and nested landslides, with diameters ranging from hundreds to a few thousands of meters. Canyon headwalls are commonly characterized by a cauliflower shape due to an array of small (diameters of tens of meters) and coalescent scars. In all these sectors, disintegrative–like landslides dominate and are generally characterized by a marked retrogressive evolution, as demonstrated by their morphology and comparison of repeated bathymetric surveys at the canyon headwall. Only in the lower part of tectonically–controlled scarps, a few cohesive–like and isolated landslides are present, indicating the main role of slope gradients and height drop in controlling the post–failure behavior of the mobilized material. Open slopes are generally characterized by large–scale (diameters of thousands of meters) and isolated scars, with associated landslide deposits. A peculiar case is represented by the Capo Vaticano Scar Complex that affected an area of about 18 km2 and is characterized by an impressive variability of landslide morphologies, varying also at short distance. The large extent and variability of such scar complex are thought to be associated with the occurrence of a mixed contouritic–turbidite system. By integrating the high–resolution morpho–bathymetric dataset with the results of previous studies, we discuss the main factors controlling the variability in size and morphology of submarine landslides developed in a tectonically–controlled setting and provide preliminary considerations on their potential geohazard in a densely populated coastal area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Submarine Landslides – Assessing the Stability of Submerged Slopes)
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Open AccessArticle
Seismic Imaging of Seafloor Deformation Induced by Impact from Large Submarine Landslide Blocks, Offshore Oregon
Geosciences 2019, 9(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9010010 - 25 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
A series of large blocks from the 44-North Slide, offshore Oregon, impacted the seafloor with sufficient force to induce a broad zone of deformation. In 2017, we acquired a seismic profile from the headwall area to the outer toe of this slide. Previous [...] Read more.
A series of large blocks from the 44-North Slide, offshore Oregon, impacted the seafloor with sufficient force to induce a broad zone of deformation. In 2017, we acquired a seismic profile from the headwall area to the outer toe of this slide. Previous work identified this slide, but it has not been imaged at high resolution before this survey. A striking surficial feature is a collection of blocks that lie downslope from an amphitheater-shaped headwall. The blocks traveled up to 20-km horizontally and about 1200-m vertically down a 13° slope and now cover an area of ~100 km2. The blocks have rough and angular edges that extend up to 400-m above the surrounding seafloor. Seaward of the blocks, a 10-km zone of sediment is deformed, horizontally shortened by 8%. We interpret the strain field to be a result of the dynamic impact forces of the slide. This suggests a high-mobility failure with tsunamigenic potential. It is unclear what preconditioned and triggered this event, however, earthquake-induced failure is one possibility. Gas hydrate dissociation may have also played a role due to the presence of a bottom-simulating reflector beneath the source area. This study underscores the need to understand the dynamic processes of submarine landslides to more accurately estimate their societal impacts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Submarine Landslides – Assessing the Stability of Submerged Slopes)
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