Special Issue "Reconstitutions of Paleoenvironments and Paleoclimates using Stable Isotope Geochemistry"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Geochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Christophe Lécuyer

Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon, Terre, Planètes et Environnement, Claude Bernard University Lyon 1 and Institut Universitaire de France, 69622 Villeurbanne, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: paleoclimatology; paleoceanography; stable isotope geochemistry; trace elements; Phanerozoic; Proterozoic

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect high quality, original and innovative research papers devoted to the reconstruction of paleoenvironments and paleoclimates based on geochemical proxies. Contributors are invited to submit studies that refer to data and interpretations having a high capacity for improving our knowledge of past-Earth climates at the global significance level. Those contributions will be especially appreciated as they will relate to their impact on ore deposits and water resources, as well as on temporal and spatial changes in either marine or terrestrial biomass and biodiversity. Case studies leading to scientific outcomes of regional significance are not encouraged, except if they involve sedimentary deposits bearing an exceptionally well-preserved faunal or floral content. Emerging techniques (imaging, spectroscopy, spectrometry) and methods (modelling, proxies, experimentation) that allow significant progress to be achieved in paleoclimatology are also warmly welcomed.

In the oceanic domain will be concerned the reconstruction of sea surface temperatures (SST) and salinity (SSS) either with depth or latitude, their seasonal variations, changes in seawater pH, variations in the d18O of seawater related to ice volume effects, and evolution of the oceanic circulation patterns depending on the greenhouse versus icehouse climate state of the Earth.

In the terrestrial domain (continents, islands) will be concerned the reconstruction of mean annual temperatures (MAT), mean annual precipitations (MAP), their long-term (104 to 106 years) and short-term (100 to 103 years) variations, prevailing winds and relative humidity. In relation to the dynamics of climate change, the sedimentary record of atmospheric chemistry (O2, CO2, CH4, SO2) will be given particular attention through the study of redox-sensitive elements (C, Cr, Cu, Fe, I, Mo, Mn, Re, S, Se, U, V, Zn), stable isotope compositions of fossil plant remain, and fluid inclusions trapped in evaporites.

Research topics will be especially considered for publication according to the keywords presented at the bottom of this page. Authors are invited to send to the Guest Editor a title, list of authors and abstract of the manuscript they would like to submit to this Special Issue of Geosciences.

Prof. Dr. Christophe Lécuyer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Mesozoic climates and vegetation
  • Paleozoic climates and atmospheric chemistry
  • Permian-Triassic boundary
  • Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary
  • Late Ordovician glaciation
  • Oceanic Anoxic Events
  • Greenhouse oceanic circulation
  • Southern Hemisphere
  • Stable Isotope Geochemistry
  • Trace element geochemistry

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Oxygen and Carbon Stable Isotope Composition of Cretaceous to Pliocene Calcareous Paleosols in the Tian Shan Region (Central Asia): Controlling Factors and Paleogeographic Implications
Geosciences 2018, 8(9), 330; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8090330
Received: 1 May 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 29 August 2018 / Published: 3 September 2018
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Abstract
The Late Mesozoic–Cenozoic topographic and climate evolution of Central Asia remains highly debated. The final retreat of the proto-Paratethys Sea from the western Tarim Basin is thought to correspond in time with the onset of tectonic uplift in the Pamir, Tian Shan and [...] Read more.
The Late Mesozoic–Cenozoic topographic and climate evolution of Central Asia remains highly debated. The final retreat of the proto-Paratethys Sea from the western Tarim Basin is thought to correspond in time with the onset of tectonic uplift in the Pamir, Tian Shan and Altai ranges, as well as with regional aridification. The oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of the sediment deposits in the various Central Asian basins have already been used to decipher both the topographic and climatic changes that occurred in that region during the Cenozoic, generally concentrating on one sedimentary section and/or on a limited time range and either using multiple-type samples including sandstone calcitic cements, marine carbonates, fossils, or paleosols. In order to get a homogeneous dataset, minimizing variations in the isotopic composition of the material depending on its type and/or depositional environment, we selected only calcareous paleosols sampled in several continuous sections covering a wide time range from the Late Jurassic to the Pliocene. Our sampling also covers a wide area encompassing the whole Tian Shan region, which allows detecting regional variations in the δ18O and δ13C values. We show that the influence of the distance to the proto-Paratethys Sea on the paleosol δ18O record was not significant. Besides local factors such as the occurrence of large lakes that can have a significant effect on the isotopic composition of the calcareous paleosols, the long-term evolution of both the δ18O and δ13C values possibly reflects the hypsometry of the river drainage systems that bring water to the basins. However, as it is commonly accepted that the δ18O of soil carbonates is controlled by the δ18O of in-situ precipitation, this last conclusion remains to be further investigated. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Dynamics of Carbonates in Soils under Different Land Use in Forest-Steppe Area of Russia Using Stable and Radiogenic Carbon Isotope Data
Geosciences 2018, 8(4), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8040144
Received: 5 April 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 21 April 2018 / Published: 23 April 2018
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Abstract
The work is aimed at the analysis of carbonate dynamics in soils under different land use. The studied area is located in the forest steppe - of the Central Russian Upland. Soils were sampled at four sites: a broadleaf forest, an adjacent 50-year [...] Read more.
The work is aimed at the analysis of carbonate dynamics in soils under different land use. The studied area is located in the forest steppe - of the Central Russian Upland. Soils were sampled at four sites: a broadleaf forest, an adjacent 50-year continuously cropped field including plots under a corn monoculture, bare fallow, and a crop rotation area with a clean fallow every fourth year. The carbonates’ morphology, their chemical composition, as well as their stable and radiogenic isotopes of carbon were studied. Clear-cut distinctions were found in the carbonate distribution throughout the profiles in the microstructure of carbonate pedofeatures, carbon isotopic composition, and radiocarbon age of carbonates between the pairs of the plots as follows: the bare fallow and the crop rotation on the one hand, and the corn monoculture and forest on the other. The distinctions are commonly assumed to result from repeating upward water fluxes, which are different in the bare soils and those with plant cover. A clear difference occurred in the hydrothermal regime for soils with and without plant cover, and was found to be the key factor of the observed differences. In addition, in soils under plant cover, the carbonate migration upward occurs due to process of transpiration, whereas in soils devoid of plants, it occurs due to physical evaporation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Stable Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotopes for Groundwater Sources of Penghu Islands, Taiwan
Geosciences 2018, 8(3), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8030084
Received: 26 October 2017 / Revised: 1 February 2018 / Accepted: 26 February 2018 / Published: 1 March 2018
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Abstract
This study used stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes as natural tracers to investigate their isotopic composition in precipitation, and in shallow and deep groundwater in the Penghu Islands in the Taiwan Strait. We aimed to understand the differences and relationships in isotope compositions [...] Read more.
This study used stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes as natural tracers to investigate their isotopic composition in precipitation, and in shallow and deep groundwater in the Penghu Islands in the Taiwan Strait. We aimed to understand the differences and relationships in isotope compositions within various water bodies and to evaluate the source of groundwater recharge. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of sampled groundwater are mainly distributed along the meteoric water line in the Penghu Islands, the variations in the distribution range being minor (the δD values are distributed from −48.2‰ to −37.7‰, with a mean value of −43.14 ± 2.4‰; the δ18O values are distributed from −6.96‰ to −5.46‰, with a mean value of −6.34 ± 0.34‰). The data suggest that the groundwater is sourced mainly from local precipitation. In addition, a comparison of the hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of groundwater and precipitation in Taiwan shows that the δ values for groundwater are distributed between those for precipitation during the northeast monsoon and the southwest monsoon seasons. However, some of the δ values trends towards the isotopic composition of the precipitation during the southwest monsoon season. Thus, the source of groundwater may have a closer association with precipitation during this time. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Miocene Slănic Tuff, Eastern Carpathians, Romania, in the Context of Badenian Salinity Crisis
Geosciences 2018, 8(2), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8020073
Received: 20 December 2017 / Revised: 12 February 2018 / Accepted: 13 February 2018 / Published: 18 February 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5131 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
New geochronological investigations for the Slănic Formation, correlated with previous bio- and lithostratigaphical information, allow for a better succession of events for the Middle Miocene, including the absolute age of the Badenian salinity crisis in the bend sector of the Eastern Carpathians. Within [...] Read more.
New geochronological investigations for the Slănic Formation, correlated with previous bio- and lithostratigaphical information, allow for a better succession of events for the Middle Miocene, including the absolute age of the Badenian salinity crisis in the bend sector of the Eastern Carpathians. Within the green Slănic Tuff, white tuff layers were in evidence. The main element distribution of the white and green tuffs indicates a dacitic composition, with higher SiO2 content for the white tuff. The white tuff has a distinct mineralogical composition with quartz, plagioclase, biotite and clinoptilolite. From such a tuff layer a biotite concentrate gives a 40Ar/39Ar age of 13.7 ± 0.2 Ma. As above these tuff layers discrete levels of gypsum occur, the age documents the beginning of the restrictive circulation and formation of evaporites in this sector of Carpathians during Badenian times. Full article
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