Special Issue "Stable Isotope Systematics of Coalbed Gas and Shale Gas during Desorption and Production"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Dariusz Strąpoć
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Schlumberger, Clamart, France
Interests: petroleum systems; organic geochemistry; shale gas; coalbed gas; biogenic methane; stable isotope systematics; subsurface microbiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are proposing this Special Edition to gather research experts and their views and observations on stable isotope signatures and fractionation of shale and coal gases during lab experiments and during commercial production, in order to better understand underlying phenomena, improve systematics, and propose new avenues of studies and suggest solutions for the petroleum industry. The complex structure of coals and shales contains high fractions of kerogen and clay minerals, which control their anisotropic and complex porosity and permeability at four levels: Within the kerogen structure, intergranular, cleats/micro fractures, and large-scale fractures. Therefore, gas release from these rocks can be a cascading multiprocess and can include adsorption/desorption, diffusion, laminar flow, Knudsen flow, Darcy flow, chromatographic effects, etc. The isotopic fractionation can have different patterns depending on the process, its character and timing (kinetic versus equilibrium effects), and special extent and boundaries (e.g., core vs producing well). An additional imprint on these isotopic patterns can be caused by anthropogenic interference with rock properties and mineralogy, i.e., via fracturing and introduction of associated fluids, surfactants or even fresh water. Studies of C, H, O isotopes, including clumped, of CO2, CH4, and other organic and inorganic gases are of high interest.

Dr. Dariusz Strąpoć
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Shale gas
  • Coalbed gas
  • Desorption
  • Diffusion
  • Isotope fractionation
  • Isotopes

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Headspace Isotope & Compositional Analysis for Unconventional Resources: Gas in Place, Permeability and Porosity Prediction and Completions Planning
Geosciences 2020, 10(9), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10090370 - 17 Sep 2020
Viewed by 645
Abstract
Cuttings/cores’ Headspace Isotope and Composition Analysis (HICA) provides an effective way to calculate the nano pore throat size and distributions much like nitrogen and CO2 adsorption BET/BJH analysis, and it could also provide information about the original pore pressure or gas in [...] Read more.
Cuttings/cores’ Headspace Isotope and Composition Analysis (HICA) provides an effective way to calculate the nano pore throat size and distributions much like nitrogen and CO2 adsorption BET/BJH analysis, and it could also provide information about the original pore pressure or gas in place. Tight gas and oil storage is different from conventional where a majority of oil and gas are stored in nanometer sized pores (nanopores). Therefore the nanofludics, i.e., nanometer scale capillary sealing and opening in nanopores of tight rocks, plays a key role in overpressure conservation and storage of oil and gas, and also the fracing process involves the opening of the nano pore capillary seals through rock-fluid interactions. The rock-fluid nanofluidics interactions during fracing could also be studied through HICA and the results could help the optimization of fracing designs. Full article
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Article
Fast Sampling Field Deployable Mud Gas Carbon Isotope Analyzer
Geosciences 2020, 10(9), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10090350 - 04 Sep 2020
Viewed by 600
Abstract
We report the details of a field deployable mud gas carbon isotope analyzer for mud gas analysis based on coupling a gas chromatograph with a mid-infrared spectrometer using a quantum cascade laser and hollow waveguide. The GC–IR2 (gas chromatograph–infrared isotope ratio) system [...] Read more.
We report the details of a field deployable mud gas carbon isotope analyzer for mud gas analysis based on coupling a gas chromatograph with a mid-infrared spectrometer using a quantum cascade laser and hollow waveguide. The GC–IR2 (gas chromatograph–infrared isotope ratio) system features a fast sampling cycle as short as 123 s for analyzing all three components, i.e., methane, ethane and propane. The samples are automatically diluted so the system could carry out effective measurements while sample concentrations vary from 400 ppm to 100% purity. The accuracy is guaranteed through periodic reference calibration, and variations due to field temperature changes are minimized. Full article
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Article
Controls on Gas Domains and Production Behaviour in A High-Rank CSG Reservoir: Insights from Molecular and Isotopic Chemistry of Co-Produced Waters and Gases from the Bowen Basin, Australia
Geosciences 2020, 10(2), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10020074 - 18 Feb 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 724
Abstract
This paper uses hydrochemical and multi-isotope analysis to investigate geological controls on coal seam gas (CSG) saturation domains and gas well production performance in a high-rank (vitrinite reflectance (Rv) > 1.1) CSG field in the north-western Bowen Basin, Australia. New hydrochemical and stable [...] Read more.
This paper uses hydrochemical and multi-isotope analysis to investigate geological controls on coal seam gas (CSG) saturation domains and gas well production performance in a high-rank (vitrinite reflectance (Rv) > 1.1) CSG field in the north-western Bowen Basin, Australia. New hydrochemical and stable isotope data were combined with existing geochemical datasets to refine hypotheses on the distribution and origins of CSG in two highly compartmentalized Permian coal seams. Stable isotopic results suggest that geographic variations in gas content, saturation and production reflect the extent of secondary microbial gas generation and retention as a function of hydrodynamics. δ13C and δ2H data support a gas mixing hypothesis with δ13C-CH4 increasing from secondary biogenic values to thermogenic values at depth (δ13C −62.2‰ to −46.3‰), whereas correlated methane and carbon dioxide carbon isotope compositions, Δ13C(CO2–CH4) values and δ13CDIC/alkalinity trends are largely consistent with microbial CO2 reduction. In addition, below 200 m, the majority of δ13C-CO2 values are positive (δ13C: −1.2‰ to 7.1‰) and δ13CDIC shows an erratic increase with depth for both seams that is characteristic of evolution via microbial activity. The progression of carbon isotope values along the CO2 reduction fractionation line suggests progressive depletion of the CO2 reservoir with increasing depth. Faults clearly segment coal seams into areas having significantly different production, with results of geochemical analysis suggesting that pooling of biogenic gas and waters and enhanced methanogenesis occur north of a faulted hinge zone. Full article
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Article
Evaluation of the Gas Content in Archived Shale Samples: A Carbon Isotope Study
Geosciences 2019, 9(11), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9110481 - 15 Nov 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 732
Abstract
We examined 14 archived samples of shale for the chemical and 13C isotopic composition of residual gases produced as part of rock-crushing operations at a hammer mill. Results were compared with data on maturity from Rock-Eval pyrolysis and vitrinite reflectance measurements. The [...] Read more.
We examined 14 archived samples of shale for the chemical and 13C isotopic composition of residual gases produced as part of rock-crushing operations at a hammer mill. Results were compared with data on maturity from Rock-Eval pyrolysis and vitrinite reflectance measurements. The samples originated from three different formations (Mikulov Marls, Ostrava Formation, and Liteň Formation) located in the Czech Republic. For comparison, we examined a gas-prone shale sample from the Polish Silurian. We used changes in the chemical and isotopic composition of released gases to evaluate the isotope fractionation during gas loss and retroactively calculated the initial content of gas in the shale samples. The gas content estimates (in L of gas per ton of rock) correspond with the maturity parameters of the shales. Calculated isotope fractionation for the gas release was −3‰ for both methane and ethane. The archived samples primarily lost methane (up to 90%), with subsequent changes in the content of ethane and higher hydrocarbon levels. Full article
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