Special Issue "From Geoheritage to Geotourism—New Advances and Emerging Challenges"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Geoheritage, Geoparks and Geotourism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 4175

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Karoly Nemeth
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Agriculture and Environment, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
Interests: volcano geology; volcano geomorphology; explosive volcanism; hydrovolcanism; volcaniclastic sedimentation; social geology; geoheritage; geoconservation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to invite you to consider submitting your works for a new state-of-the-art collection of papers, outlining the advances geoheritage research has achieved since being established and making its place among other geosciences. This volume calls for papers that are able to highlight the route various disciplines within geoheritage research have taken in the past two decades, leading to the currently flourishing and fast-developing science that has fed such subdisciplines as geoconservation, geoeducation and geotourism, among many others. We would like to make this Special Issue a landmark work, that provides a holistic overview of the evolution of the geoheritage science and how it has helped to foster such practical research fields as geotourism, also addressing how all these achievements can serve to embed the geosciences more deeply in the network of sciences and the actions of society at a time when global and planetary change is clearly visible within the human life span. We are particularly interested in holistic review-style works that not only provide a critical overview of the evolution of the science field in question, but also offer solutions towards the future. The volume will also take specific case studies if they provide a clear overview as to how and why that specific region, area or subject serves to foster a more holistic approach to geoheritage, geoconservation or geotourism. Interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary works are especially welcome in this volume, in which the boundaries between the geosciences and other science fields are crossed, explored or narrowed, in order to define geoheritage research in its broadest sense. High-quality review papers can be published in this issue without publication fees.

Prof. Dr. Karoly Nemeth
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Geoheritage
  • Geoconservation
  • Geosite
  • Geotope
  • Geoconservation
  • Geoeducation
  • Geotoursim
  • Sustainability
  • Geopark
  • Ecosystem Services
  • Geosystem

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Visitation Rate Analysis of Geoheritage Features from Earth Science Education Perspective Using Automated Landform Classification and Crowdsourcing: A Geoeducation Capacity Map of the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand
Geosciences 2021, 11(11), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11110480 - 22 Nov 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1111
Abstract
The increase in geoheritage studies has secured recognition globally regarding the importance of abiotic natural features. Prominent in geoheritage screening practices follows a multicriteria assessment framework; however, the complexity of interest in values often causes decision making to overlook geoeducation, one of the [...] Read more.
The increase in geoheritage studies has secured recognition globally regarding the importance of abiotic natural features. Prominent in geoheritage screening practices follows a multicriteria assessment framework; however, the complexity of interest in values often causes decision making to overlook geoeducation, one of the primary facets of geosystem services. Auckland volcanic field in New Zealand stretches through the whole area of metropolitan Auckland, which helps preserve volcanic cones and their cultural heritage around its central business district (CBD). They are important sites for developing tourist activities. Geoeducation is becoming a significant factor for tourists and others visiting geomorphological features, but it cannot be achieved without sound planning. This paper investigates the use of big data (FlickR), Geopreservation Inventory, and Geographic Information System for identifying geoeducation capacity of tourist attractions. Through landform classification using the Topographic Position Index and integrated with geological and the inventory data, the underpromoted important geoeducation sites can be mapped and added to the spatial database Auckland Council uses for urban planning. The use of the Geoeducation Capacity Map can help resolve conflicts between the multiple objectives that a bicultural, metropolitan city council need to tackle in the planning of upgrading open spaces while battling of growing demand for land. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Geoheritage to Geotourism—New Advances and Emerging Challenges)
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Article
Tectonic Influence on Speleogenesis of Sea Caves on Biševo Island (UNESCO Global Geopark Vis Archipelago, Adriatic Sea, Croatia)
Geosciences 2021, 11(8), 341; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11080341 - 13 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1120
Abstract
A geological and speleological investigation was conducted in the famous Blue Cave (Modra špilja) and the Monk Seal Cave (Medvidina špilja) on Biševo Island (Croatia) to promote the island’s geoheritage through the new Visitor Centre. The island is mainly composed of Cretaceous to [...] Read more.
A geological and speleological investigation was conducted in the famous Blue Cave (Modra špilja) and the Monk Seal Cave (Medvidina špilja) on Biševo Island (Croatia) to promote the island’s geoheritage through the new Visitor Centre. The island is mainly composed of Cretaceous to Paleogene neritic carbonates, which form the bedrock, whereas parts of the island are covered with thin Quaternary sediments. The caves are of small dimensions and a simple layout, composed of the main channel and few shorter side channels, all positioned in the tidal zone. Thus, the caves are semi-submerged sea caves located along the coastline. The Blue Cave and the Monk Seal Cave developed within the bedrock limestones and dolostones, respectively, within a zone of left-lateral NNE–SSW striking strike-slip faults that belong to the Biševo fault system. Conjugated discontinuities within the carbonate bedrock indicate a specific strike-slip tectonic regime. Additionally, the host rocks were probably also deformed and fractured during the rise of salt diapirs that characterise this part of the Adriatic foreland. Tectonic and bedding discontinuities form the fragments of the host rock, that combined with the impacts of the strong southern waves, significantly influenced the genesis of the caves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Geoheritage to Geotourism—New Advances and Emerging Challenges)
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Article
From Cultural Landscape to Aspiring Geopark: 15 Years of Community-Based Landscape Tourism in Fengnan Village, Hualien County, Taiwan (2006–2021)
Geosciences 2021, 11(8), 310; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11080310 - 25 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1029
Abstract
Geoconservation plays a key role in valuing and conserving abiotic nature, while geotourism can be an effective means of achieving this objective. Connectivity between biophysical and socio-economic components and a community-based perspective on appreciation and interpretation of landscape resources are important yet not [...] Read more.
Geoconservation plays a key role in valuing and conserving abiotic nature, while geotourism can be an effective means of achieving this objective. Connectivity between biophysical and socio-economic components and a community-based perspective on appreciation and interpretation of landscape resources are important yet not well understood. This study is a retrospective analysis of 15 years (2006–2021) of integrated landscape management in Fengnan Village, Hualien County, Taiwan, with a focus on the evolution of multi-stakeholder perception of local geodiversity and emergence of geotourism as part of community-based landscape tourism in the area. A qualitative multiple-method approach to data collection and analysis was based on the “know–cherish–show” interpretation model and the theory of collaborative planning. The results demonstrate that (a) geoconservation and geotourism have evolved to become an integral part of the Fengnan living landscape, while connectivity between nature–culture attributes has strengthened over the years; (b) multi-stakeholder collaboration and knowledge-bridging are characteristic features of the institutional arrangement; and (c) facilitating the role of the bridging stakeholder (the authors) was central to the timely introduction of various landscape concepts for long-term geoconservation in the area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Geoheritage to Geotourism—New Advances and Emerging Challenges)
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