Special Issue "Quaternary Foraminifera and Ostracoda Response to Coastal Palaeoenvironments"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Biogeosciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
PD Dr. Peter Frenzel

Institute of Earth Sciences, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Burgweg 11, 07749 Jena, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: palaeoenvironmental analysis; Ostracoda; Foraminifera; Quaternary; brackish water ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Foraminifera and Ostracoda are classical microfossil groups with a rich publication record, already started in the late 18th century. Their high preservation potential, wide distribution and often high abundance in aquatic habitats, available taxonomic and ecological information and their small size make them excellent proxies of past environmental conditions and processes. Most applications of both microfossil groups are published for the Quaternary. During this period, biological information from extant species can be used for fossil associations, e.g., by relying on ecological preferences and tolerances, on transfer functions or environmentally-driven intraspecific morphological variability.

Marginal marine systems form the transitional areas between marine and continental environments thus linking marine and continental geosciences. In such marginal marine settings foraminifers and ostracods are complementing each other in their distribution along the salinity gradient. Foraminifers are clearly dominating in marine sediments, whereas they decrease in diversity and abundance with decreasing salinity and disappear in freshwater. Ostracods are present in all salinity realms but less abundant than foraminifers in marine waters. In contrast, ostracods often show very high abundances in brackish waters and are important microfossils in lakes and other continental water bodies. Both groups are versatile tools in coastal environments for a wide range of research fields, such as sedimentology, geomorphology, hydrology, palaeoecology, geoarchaeology or water quality assessment, sea level and geo-hazard studies.

This Special Issue of Geosciences will give an overview on recent developments in applying Quaternary foraminifers and ostracods in coastal geosciences by providing reviews, new methods and case studies for the fellow micropalaeontologist. Furthermore, we intend to promote their wider application to other geoscientists working in coastal environments.

We are looking forward to see your submissions for this Special Issue, bringing Foraminifera and Ostracoda forward in Quaternary geosciences.

PD Dr. Peter Frenzel
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Foraminifera
  • Ostracoda
  • Quaternary
  • Marginal marine
  • Estuarine
  • Palaeoecology
  • Coastal morphology
  • Environmental Micropalaeontology
  • Sea level
  • Geo-hazards
  • Geoarchaeology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Intraspecific Length Variation and Shell Thickness of the Ostracod Cyprideis torosa (Jones, 1850) as a Potential Tool for Palaeosalinity Characterization
Geosciences 2019, 9(2), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9020083
Received: 31 December 2018 / Revised: 23 January 2019 / Accepted: 11 February 2019 / Published: 13 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2391 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cyprideis torosa (Jones) is a common ostracod species in brackish waters of large parts of the world. The species appears in, but it is not restricted to, marginal marine areas, and it thus plays a significant role in identifying variable impacts between the [...] Read more.
Cyprideis torosa (Jones) is a common ostracod species in brackish waters of large parts of the world. The species appears in, but it is not restricted to, marginal marine areas, and it thus plays a significant role in identifying variable impacts between the marine and terrestrial realms as its carapace changes phenotypically under various conditions. This variability could be a highly valuable source of information in palaeoecology. We use valves of this species living in different lagoonal and lacustrine environments of the Kızılırmak Delta at the Turkish Black Sea coast since the Mid-Holocene. By measuring the valve sizes of adult individuals and A-1 instars and documenting the thickness classes of the adult shells we found a good positive correlation between the size of female valves and the prevailing salinity (correlation coefficient: 0.56), while such a correlation is lacking for ontogenetic stage A-1. No changes of the height/length ratio of the valves were recognizable along the salinity gradient. Shells are significantly thicker under relatively stable, higher saline conditions, but thinner in highly variable and low saline deltaic lakes. Both morphological features, size and shell thickness of C. torosa (Cyprideis torosa), are thus potential tools to give palaeo-environmental information, especially in C. torosa-dominated, low diversity marginal marine environments. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Using a Multi-Proxy Approach to Detect and Date a Buried part of the Hellenistic City Wall of Ainos (NW Turkey)
Geosciences 2018, 8(10), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8100357
Received: 14 August 2018 / Revised: 1 September 2018 / Accepted: 6 September 2018 / Published: 20 September 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (6757 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Throughout mankind’s history, the need to secure and protect the home settlement was an essential one. This holds especially true for the city of Ainos (modern Enez) in Turkish Thrace. Due to its continuous settlement history since the 7th/6th century BC, several different [...] Read more.
Throughout mankind’s history, the need to secure and protect the home settlement was an essential one. This holds especially true for the city of Ainos (modern Enez) in Turkish Thrace. Due to its continuous settlement history since the 7th/6th century BC, several different types of city walls were built—sometimes even on top of each other—several of which have been preserved over time. To decipher the construction style, the course and the age of a buried city wall segment in the southern part of the former city, a geoscientific multi-proxy approach including magnetic gradiometer (MG) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) measurements in combination with granulometrical, sedimentological and microfaunistical investigations on sediment cores was applied. We were able to (1) present reasonable arguments for its Hellenistic age; (2) reveal the course of this wall segment and extrapolate it further north into a less studied area; and (3) demonstrate that in this near-coastal area, the former swampy terrain had been consolidated for constructing the wall. Our multi-proxy approach serves as a valuable example for investigating buried structures in archaeological contexts, avoiding a less-economical, time-consuming, or even forbidden excavation. Full article
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