Special Issue "Future Advances in Basin Modeling: Suggestions from Current Observations, Analyses, and Simulations"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Willy Fjeldskaar Website E-Mail
Tectonor AS, Stavanger, Norway
Interests: basin modelling; structural deveopment; tectonic processes; thermal regime; post glacial rebound
Guest Editor
Prof. Lawrence Cathles Website E-Mail
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
Interests: Post-glacial rebound; basin modelling; fluid flow in sedimentary basins; fluid-rock interactions in basins

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The intent of this special issue is to assemble a set or papers that describe the nature, causes, and consequences of the diverse fluid movements that occur in basins. The papers will provide a perspective of what could be added in the next generation of basin models. The twelve already committed papers describe the impact of magmatic sill intrusion and salt migration on maturation (incorporating fault movements), gas movements in the South China Sea, the maturation of Paleozoic source rock in the Llanos Basin of Colombia, the dynamic venting of H2 gas from Paleozoic formations, alteration and permeability modification related to petroleum migration, the impact of multiple glaciations on maturation and migration, and the detection of flow pathways using passive seismic techniques. Papers not yet committed could address secondary migration, determination of thermal conductivity from well log profiles, and gas desorption following glacial unloading. Fundamental questions such as continental lithosphere thickness and the characterization of unconventional hydrocarbon resources might also be included. 

The volume will be available free online and the cost per author is minimal, so its impact will depend on the quality and novelty of the included papers. Our intent is to distribute and update a list of tentative titles as papers are committed so that authors can see how their contribution fits into the overall context of the volume. Articles will be published as soon as they are accepted. The suggested August 31, 2019 deadline is not a firm deadline for the volume. Important contributions will be accepted after this date.

Dr. Willy Fjeldskaar
Prof. Lawrence Cathles
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Structural evolution
  • Thermal development
  • Diagenesis
  • Hydrocarbon maturation
  • Migration of hydrocarbons
  • Unconventional resources
  • Geophysical monitoring 

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
On the Significance of Salt Modelling—Example from Modelling of Salt Tectonics, Temperature and Maturity Around Salt Structures in Southern North Sea
Geosciences 2019, 9(9), 363; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9090363 - 22 Aug 2019
Abstract
Salt structures are attractive targets for hydrocarbon exploration. Salt can flow as a viscous fluid, act as hydrocarbon seal, and salt-related deformation may create reservoir traps. The high conductivity of salt can be crucial for hydrocarbon maturation in a basin. Here, we present [...] Read more.
Salt structures are attractive targets for hydrocarbon exploration. Salt can flow as a viscous fluid, act as hydrocarbon seal, and salt-related deformation may create reservoir traps. The high conductivity of salt can be crucial for hydrocarbon maturation in a basin. Here, we present results from the study of salt structures on the Eastern flank of Central Graben, on the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. By using our in-house basin modeling software (BMTTM), we modelled the salt structure evolution and the effects of salt on temperature and maturation. Our results show up to 85 °C cooling due to the salt heat pipe effect. An integrated impact of cooling is the depression of vitrinite Ro by up to 1.0% at the base of a large salt balloon. Our work shows that it is of critical importance to correctly identify salt volumes and to have a good geological model, and to understand the timing and geometrical evolution of salt structures. This study is, to our knowledge, the most specific analysis of the impact of salt on basin temperature and maturation published so far, and is an example of how basin modeling in the future should be an integrated part of exploration. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Impact of Salt Tectonics on the Thermal Evolution and the Petroleum System of Confined Rift Basins: Insights from Basin Modeling of the Nordkapp Basin, Norwegian Barents Sea
Geosciences 2019, 9(7), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9070316 - 17 Jul 2019
Abstract
Although the thermal effect of large salt tongues and allochthonous salt sheets in passive margins is described in the literature, little is known about the thermal effect of salt structures in confined rift basins where sub-vertical, closely spaced salt diapirs may affect the [...] Read more.
Although the thermal effect of large salt tongues and allochthonous salt sheets in passive margins is described in the literature, little is known about the thermal effect of salt structures in confined rift basins where sub-vertical, closely spaced salt diapirs may affect the thermal evolution and petroleum system of the basin. In this study, we combine 2D structural restorations with thermal modeling to investigate the dynamic history of salt movement and its thermal effect in the Nordkapp Basin, a confined salt-bearing basin in the Norwegian Barents Sea. Two sections, one across the central sub-basin and another across the eastern sub-basin, are modeled. The central sub-basin shows deeply rooted, narrow and closely spaced diapirs, while the eastern sub-basin contains a shallower rooted, wide, isolated diapir. Variations through time in stratigraphy (source rocks), structures (salt diapirs and minibasins), and thermal boundary conditions (basal heat flow and sediment-water interface temperatures) are considered in the model. Present-day bottom hole temperatures and vitrinite data provide validation of the model. The modeling results in the eastern sub-basin show a strong but laterally limited thermal anomaly associated with the massive diapir, where temperatures in the diapir are 70 °C cooler than in the adjacent minibasins. In the central sub-basin, the thermal anomalies of closely-spaced diapirs mutually interfere and induce a combined anomaly that reduces the temperature in the minibasins by up to 50 °C with respect to the platform areas. Consequently, source rock maturation in the areas thermally affected by the diapirs is retarded, and the hydrocarbon generation window is expanded. Although subject to uncertainties in the model input parameters, these results demonstrate new exploration concepts (e.g., deep hydrocarbon kitchens) that are important for evaluating the prospectivity of the Nordkapp Basin and similar basins around the world. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Transient Thermal Effects in Sedimentary Basins with Normal Faults and Magmatic Sill Intrusions—A Sensitivity Study
Geosciences 2019, 9(4), 160; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9040160 - 05 Apr 2019
Abstract
Magmatic intrusions affect the basin temperature in their vicinity. Faulting and physical properties of the basin may influence the magnitudes of their thermal effects and the potential source rock maturation. We present results from a sensitivity study of the most important factors affecting [...] Read more.
Magmatic intrusions affect the basin temperature in their vicinity. Faulting and physical properties of the basin may influence the magnitudes of their thermal effects and the potential source rock maturation. We present results from a sensitivity study of the most important factors affecting the thermal history in structurally complex sedimentary basins with magmatic sill intrusions. These factors are related to faulting, physical properties, and restoration methods: (1) fault displacement, (2) time span of faulting and deposition, (3) fault angle, (4) thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, (5) basal heat flow and (6) restoration method. All modeling is performed on the same constructed clastic sedimentary profile containing one normal listric fault with one faulting event. Sills are modeled to intrude into either side of the fault zone with a temperature of 1000 °C. The results show that transient thermal effects may last up to several million years after fault slip. Thermal differences up to 40 °C could occur for sills intruding at time of fault slip, to sills intruding 10 million years later. We have shown that omitting the transient thermal effects of structural development in basins with magmatic intrusions may lead to over- or underestimation of the thermal effects of magmatic intrusions and ultimately the estimated maturation. Full article
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