Special Issue "Risk and Vulnerability Assessment of Residential and Commercial Building Types for Earthquake Ground Shaking"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Hazards".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 5409

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Davorin Penava
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Architecture Osijek, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, 31000 Osijek, Croatia
Interests: earthquake performance; masonry structures; r. c. structures; experimental mechanics; computational micromodelling; seismology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Lars Abrahamczyk
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chair of Advanced Structures, Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, 99423 Weimar, Germany
Interests: seismic vulnerability; RC structures; masonry buildings; rehabilitation; heritage buildings; effects of climate change
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Assist. Prof. Dr. Simon Petrovčič
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Architecture, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Interests: structural engineering; earthquake engieering; architectural heritage conservation; vulnerability assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Past and current damaging earthquakes have repeatedly shown the vulnerability of residential building types and the need for mitigation measures. The earthquake risk and vulnerability assessment of buildings for future earthquake ground shaking relies on the development of the damage prediction models based upon experiences from past earthquakes. Typical damage patterns and the derivation of damage grades are derived from earthquake reconnaissance reports or laboratory tests. In addition to the principal cause, ground shaking, the damage degree is related to the building’s characteristics, such as choice of form and materials, design and detailing, type, soil and foundations, robustness, etc.

The Special Issue focuses on reliable damage prognosis for residential and commercial building types such as masonry (modern and historical) and reinforced concrete (frame and wall) buildings. It shall support a holistic view on damage scenarios for single buildings as well as building stocks. The principal objectives of the Special Issue are: earthquake risk and vulnerability assessment of buildings, retrofitting and restoration (conservation) of buildings, methods of analysis, detailing rules, interaction phenomena between primary and secondary structural elements, as well as architectural design and detailing.

Prof. Dr. Davorin Penava
Prof. Dr. Lars Abrahamczyk
Assist. Prof. Dr. Simon Petrovčič
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • RC and masonry building types
  • Field reports/damage observation
  • Seismic behavior
  • Damage scenarios
  • Risk and vulnerability assessment
  • Methods of analysis
  • Architectural design
  • Heritage buildings

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Development and Calibration of a 3D Micromodel for Evaluation of Masonry Infilled RC Frame Structural Vulnerability to Earthquakes
Geosciences 2021, 11(11), 468; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11110468 - 12 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1094
Abstract
Within the scope of literature, the influence of openings within the infill walls that are bounded by a reinforced concrete frame and excited by seismic drift forces in both in- and out-of-plane direction is still uncharted. Therefore, a 3D micromodel was developed and [...] Read more.
Within the scope of literature, the influence of openings within the infill walls that are bounded by a reinforced concrete frame and excited by seismic drift forces in both in- and out-of-plane direction is still uncharted. Therefore, a 3D micromodel was developed and calibrated thereafter, to gain more insight in the topic. The micromodels were calibrated against their equivalent physical test specimens of in-plane, out-of-plane drift driven tests on frames with and without infill walls and openings, as well as out-of-plane bend test of masonry walls. Micromodels were rectified based on their behavior and damage states. As a result of the calibration process, it was found that micromodels were sensitive and insensitive to various parameters, regarding the model’s behavior and computational stability. It was found that, even within the same material model, some parameters had more effects when attributed to concrete rather than on masonry. Generally, the in-plane behavior of infilled frames was found to be largely governed by the interface material model. The out-of-plane masonry wall simulations were governed by the tensile strength of both the interface and masonry material model. Yet, the out-of-plane drift driven test was governed by the concrete material properties. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Preliminary Observations on Historical Castle Trakošćan (Croatia) Performance under Recent ML ≥ 5.5 Earthquakes
Geosciences 2021, 11(11), 461; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11110461 - 09 Nov 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1368
Abstract
Trakošćan Castle, built on a rocky peak in the late 13th century, is a cultural heritage site protected as a historical entity by the Republic of Croatia. The Castle is constructed as a highly irregular masonry structure with timber or shallow masonry arches, [...] Read more.
Trakošćan Castle, built on a rocky peak in the late 13th century, is a cultural heritage site protected as a historical entity by the Republic of Croatia. The Castle is constructed as a highly irregular masonry structure with timber or shallow masonry arches, vaults or dome floors. It was substantially renewed, upgraded and partially retrofitted from the 16th century until the year 2000. The M5.5 (VIII EMS) and M6.2 (VIII-IX EMS) earthquakes, which struck the city of Zagreb on 22 March 2020 and the Pokupsko-Petrinja area on 29 December 2020, strongly shook the Castle’s structure. Earthquake damage was observed and assessed by visual inspection accompanied by ambient vibration measurements. The slight cracks that appeared on masonry arches were found to be critically positioned, and can likely lead to the arches’ collapse if their spreading is not prevented. Ambient vibration measurements, which were compared to pre-earthquake ones, revealed the decrease in the fundamental frequencies of the Castle’s central tower unit and the second floor, thus possibly indicating the loss of structural stiffness as a consequence of the earthquake damage. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Sensitivity of Earthquake Damage Estimation to the Input Data (Soil Characterization Maps and Building Exposure): Case Study in the Luchon Valley, France
Geosciences 2021, 11(6), 249; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11060249 - 07 Jun 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2253
Abstract
This article studies the effects of the soil data and exposure data of residential building inventories, as well as their spatial resolution, on seismic damage and loss estimates for a given earthquake scenario. Our aim is to investigate how beneficial it would be [...] Read more.
This article studies the effects of the soil data and exposure data of residential building inventories, as well as their spatial resolution, on seismic damage and loss estimates for a given earthquake scenario. Our aim is to investigate how beneficial it would be to acquire higher resolution inventories at the cost of additional effort and resources. Seismic damage computations are used to evaluate the relative influence of varying spatial resolution on a given damage model, where other parameters were held constant. We use soil characterization maps and building exposure inventories, provided at different scales from different sources: the European database, a national dataset at the municipality scale, and local field investigations. Soil characteristics are used to evaluate site effects and to assign amplification factors to the strong motion applied to the exposed areas. Exposure datasets are used to assign vulnerability indices to sets of buildings, from which a damage distribution is produced (based on the applied seismic intensity). The different spatial resolutions are benchmarked in a case-study area which is subject to moderate-to-average seismicity levels (Luchon valley in the Pyrénées, France). It was found that the proportion of heavily damaged buildings is underestimated when using the European soil map and the European building database, while the more refined databases (national/regional vs. local maps) result in similar estimates for moderate earthquake scenarios. Finally, we highlight the importance of pooling open access data from different sources, but caution the challenges of combining different datasets, especially depending on the type of application that is pursued (e.g., for risk mitigation or rapid response tools). Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop