Special Issue "Heat Stress Response in Plants"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sotirios Fragkostefanakis
Website
Guest Editor
Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Dept Biosci, Mol Cell Biol Plants, D-60438 Frankfurt, Germany
Interests: plant molecular biology; abiotic stress response; protein homeostasis
Prof. Dr. Enrico Schleiff
Website
Guest Editor
Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Dept Biosci, Mol Cell Biol Plants, D-60438 Frankfurt, Germany; Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Straße 1. 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Interests: plant molecular biology; protein homeostasis; ribosome biogenesis; membrane dynamics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Global warming is currently one of the major threats for the survival of ecosystems and productivity of crops. Strong temperature increases in the form of, for example, heat waves or long-term mild temperature elevations cause stress which can impair plant growth and developmental processes. Due to their sessile nature, plants engage in a multitude of physiological and molecular responses aiming to minimize stress damages, enhance adaptation capacity, and eventually recover from stress. During the last few years, -omics approaches have described the global changes from RNA to metabolite profiles and point to the existence of multiple levels of regulatory mechanisms that facilitate the tight control of stress response according to the cellular demands. This requires the coordination of temperature-sensing mechanisms and signal transduction pathways to translate environmental cues to molecular responses. As sensitivity to high temperatures depends on the developmental stage of the plant and varies among different cell types, it is no surprise that a global model for stress response has not been established. In turn, there is a need for a high-resolution, multidimensional description of dynamic changes to define the key aspects of thermotolerance from the cellular to the organismic levels. Such information will enhance our understanding on stress response and thermotolerance and is likely to provide tools for the generation of resilient germplasm.

The forthcoming Special Issue aims to collect original research articles and reviews on recent topics in plant heat stress response and thermotolerance, including but not limited to: (a) global -omics approaches to decipher temperature and tissue- or cell-specific alterations at transcriptome, epigenome, proteome, and metabolome, (b) effects of heat stress on transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation and identification of regulators involved such changes, (c) temperature-dependent alterations at proteome level including post-translational modifications, (d) effects of high temperature on chromatin structure and epigenetic phenomena related to stress response and thermotolerance, (e) identification of genetic loci and specific genes associated with thermotolerance, and (f) genetic and biotechnological approaches to improve crop resilience against heat stress. Original research both on model and crop plants is welcome.

Dr. Sotirios Fragkostefanakis
Prof. Dr. Enrico Schleiff
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • High temperatures
  • Thermotolerance
  • Stress memory
  • Temperature sensing
  • Signal transduction
  • Protein homeostasis
  • Genomics
  • Transcriptomics
  • Proteomics
  • Metabolomics
  • Epigenetics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Transcriptional Basis for Differential Thermosensitivity of Seedlings of Various Tomato Genotypes
Genes 2020, 11(6), 655; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11060655 - 16 Jun 2020
Abstract
Transcriptional reprograming after the exposure of plants to elevated temperatures is a hallmark of stress response which is required for the manifestation of thermotolerance. Central transcription factors regulate the stress survival and recovery mechanisms and many of the core responses controlled by these [...] Read more.
Transcriptional reprograming after the exposure of plants to elevated temperatures is a hallmark of stress response which is required for the manifestation of thermotolerance. Central transcription factors regulate the stress survival and recovery mechanisms and many of the core responses controlled by these factors are well described. In turn, pathways and specific genes contributing to variations in the thermotolerance capacity even among closely related plant genotypes are not well defined. A seedling-based assay was developed to directly compare the growth and transcriptome response to heat stress in four tomato genotypes with contrasting thermotolerance. The conserved and the genotype-specific alterations of mRNA abundance in response to heat stress were monitored after exposure to three different temperatures. The transcripts of the majority of genes behave similarly in all genotypes, including the majority of heat stress transcription factors and heat shock proteins, but also genes involved in photosynthesis and mitochondrial ATP production. In turn, genes involved in hormone and RNA-based regulation, such as auxin- and ethylene-related genes, or transcription factors like HsfA6b, show a differential regulation that associates with the thermotolerance pattern. Our results provide an inventory of genes likely involved in core and genotype-dependent heat stress response mechanisms with putative role in thermotolerance in tomato seedlings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heat Stress Response in Plants)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Structural and Functional Heat Stress Responses of Chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana
Genes 2020, 11(6), 650; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11060650 - 12 Jun 2020
Abstract
Temperature elevations constitute a major threat to plant performance. In recent years, much was learned about the general molecular mode of heat stress reaction of plants. The current research focuses on the integration of the knowledge into more global networks, including the reactions [...] Read more.
Temperature elevations constitute a major threat to plant performance. In recent years, much was learned about the general molecular mode of heat stress reaction of plants. The current research focuses on the integration of the knowledge into more global networks, including the reactions of cellular compartments. For instance, chloroplast function is central for plant growth and survival, and the performance of chloroplasts is tightly linked to the general status of the cell and vice versa. We examined the changes in photosynthesis, chloroplast morphology and proteomic composition posed in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts after a single or repetitive heat stress treatment over a period of two weeks. We observed that the acclimation is potent in the case of repetitive application of heat stress, while a single stress results in lasting alterations. Moreover, the physiological capacity and its adjustment are dependent on the efficiency of the protein translocation process as judged from the analysis of mutants of the two receptor units of the chloroplast translocon, TOC64, and TOC33. In response to repetitive heat stress, plants without TOC33 accumulate Hsp70 proteins and plants without TOC64 have a higher content of proteins involved in thylakoid structure determination when compared to wild-type plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heat Stress Response in Plants)
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Open AccessArticle
High-Throughput Genotyping of Resilient Tomato Landraces to Detect Candidate Genes Involved in the Response to High Temperatures
Genes 2020, 11(6), 626; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11060626 - 07 Jun 2020
Abstract
The selection of tolerant varieties is a powerful strategy to ensure highly stable yield under elevated temperatures. In this paper, we report the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of 10 tomato landraces to identify the best performing under high temperatures. The phenotyping of five [...] Read more.
The selection of tolerant varieties is a powerful strategy to ensure highly stable yield under elevated temperatures. In this paper, we report the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of 10 tomato landraces to identify the best performing under high temperatures. The phenotyping of five yield-related traits allowed us to select one genotype that exhibits highly stable yield performances in different environmental conditions. Moreover, a Genotyping-by-Sequencing approach allowed us to explore the genetic variability of the tested genotypes. The high and stable yielding landrace E42 was the most polymorphic one, with ~49% and ~47% private SNPs and InDels, respectively. The effect of 26,113 mutations on proteins’ structure was investigated and it was discovered that 37 had a high impact on the structure of 34 proteins of which some are putatively involved in responses to high temperatures. Additionally, 129 polymorphic sequences aligned against tomato wild species genomes revealed the presence in the genotype E42 of several introgressed regions deriving from S. pimpinellifolium. The position on the tomato map of genes affected by moderate and high impact mutations was also compared with that of known markers/QTLs (Quantitative Trait Loci) associated with reproductive and yield-related traits. The candidate genes/QTLs regulating heat tolerance in the selected landrace E42 could be further investigated to better understand the genetic mechanisms controlling traits for high and stable yield trait under high temperatures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heat Stress Response in Plants)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Interaction between the Circadian Clock and Regulators of Heat Stress Responses in Plants
Genes 2020, 11(2), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11020156 - 01 Feb 2020
Abstract
The circadian clock is found ubiquitously in nature, and helps organisms coordinate internal biological processes with environmental cues that inform the time of the day or year. Both temperature stress and the clock affect many important biological processes in plants. Specifically, clock-controlled gene [...] Read more.
The circadian clock is found ubiquitously in nature, and helps organisms coordinate internal biological processes with environmental cues that inform the time of the day or year. Both temperature stress and the clock affect many important biological processes in plants. Specifically, clock-controlled gene regulation and growth are impacted by a compromised clock or heat stress. The interactions linking these two regulatory pathways include several rhythmic transcription factors that are important for coordinating the appropriate response to temperature stress. Here we review the current understanding of clock control of the regulators involved in heat stress responses in plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heat Stress Response in Plants)
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