Special Issue "Molecular Biomarkers in Solid Tumors"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Nicola Fusco
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Guest Editor
1. Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, University of Milan, Italy2. Division of Pathology, IRCCS European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy
Interests: breast cancer; biomarkers; DNA repair system; tumor microenvironment; immunopathology
Prof. Dr. Caterina Marchiò
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.2. Division of Pathology, FPO-IRCCS Candiolo Cancer Institute, Candiolo, Italy.
Interests: breast cancer; molecular pathology; HER2 status; tumor heterogeneity; tumor microenvironment
Dr. Michele Ghidini
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Guest Editor
Division of Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda – Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy
Interests: gastric cancer; colorectal cancer; hepatobiliary cancer; liquid biopsy; liver cancer
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Cristian Scatena
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Guest Editor
Division of Surgical Pathology, Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Italy
Interests: breast cancer; melanoma; cancer plasticity; metastasis; molecular pathology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Our understanding of the pathogenesis of solid tumors at the molecular level is expanding day by day. Due to unprecedented technological developments, coupled with novel holistic approaches in translational research, a multitude of biomarkers at genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and immunologic levels have been discovered. These biomarkers are strongly impacting treatment decision making in patients with solid tumors.

This Special Issue in Genes on “Molecular Biomarkers in Solid Tumors” will provide a monographic portrait of the current state of knowledge of biomarkers for the clinical management of cancer patients. We especially welcome review articles (either systematic or discursive), original translational research studies, and short communications of preliminary, but significant, experimental results.

Prof. Nicola Fusco
Prof. Caterina Marchiò
Dr. Cristian Scatena
Dr. Michele Ghidini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Biomarkers
  • Translational research
  • Precision medicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Prognostic Significance of RAS Mutations and P53 Expression in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas
Genes 2020, 11(7), 751; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11070751 - 06 Jul 2020
Abstract
TP53 is considered the most commonly-altered gene in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Conversely, RAS mutations have been reported in a low percentage of cSCC. The objective of our study was to evaluate the frequency of p53 expression and RAS mutations in cSCC [...] Read more.
TP53 is considered the most commonly-altered gene in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Conversely, RAS mutations have been reported in a low percentage of cSCC. The objective of our study was to evaluate the frequency of p53 expression and RAS mutations in cSCC and correlate them with clinicopathological features and patient outcome. We performed immunohistochemistry for p53 and genetic profiling for RAS mutations in a retrospective series of cSCC. The predictive value of p53 expression, RAS mutations, and clinicopathological parameters was assessed using logistic regression models. The overall frequency of RAS mutations was 9.3% (15/162), and 82.1% of the cases (133/162) had p53 overexpression. RAS mutations rate was 3.2% (1/31) of in situ cSCCs and 10.7% (14/131) of invasive cSCCs. RAS mutations were more frequently associated with an infiltrative than an expansive pattern of invasion (p = 0.046). p53 overexpression was a predictor of recurrence in the univariate analysis. Our results indicate that RAS mutations associate with features of local aggressiveness. Larger studies with more recurrent and metastatic cSCCs are necessary to further address the prognostic significance of p53 overexpression in patients’ risk stratification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biomarkers in Solid Tumors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
PTEN Alterations and Their Role in Cancer Management: Are We Making Headway on Precision Medicine?
Genes 2020, 11(7), 719; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11070719 - 28 Jun 2020
Abstract
Alterations in the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) occur in a substantial proportion of solid tumors. These events drive tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Given its central role as a downregulator of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) [...] Read more.
Alterations in the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) occur in a substantial proportion of solid tumors. These events drive tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Given its central role as a downregulator of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, PTEN is deeply involved in cell growth, proliferation, and survival. This gene is also implicated in the modulation of the DNA damage response and in tumor immune microenvironment modeling. Despite the actionability of PTEN alterations, their role as biomarkers remains controversial in clinical practice. To date, there is still a substantial lack of validated guidelines and/or recommendations for PTEN testing. Here, we provide an update on the current state of knowledge on biologic and genetic alterations of PTEN across the most frequent solid tumors, as well as on their actual and/or possible clinical applications. We focus on possible tailored schemes for cancer patients’ clinical management, including risk assessment, diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biomarkers in Solid Tumors)
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