Special Issue "Advances in Canine Genetics"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2022 | Viewed by 2193

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Dayna Dreger
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
Interests: domestic dog; selection; population genetics; breeds; morphology; behavior; canine genetics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The centuries through which humans have shared our homes and livelihoods with dogs are written in their genomes. Our technological and analytical innovations allow us to reveal those long-held secrets that have tied our species together over time. Through the combined efforts of the global canine genetics research community, the domestic dog has been propelled to the forefront of scientific advancements in the areas of health, morphology, population genetics, domestication, and behavior. The continually improving accessibility to cutting-edge genetic technologies has opened the door for amazing discoveries that benefit both dogs and humans.

This Special Issue on advances in canine genetics will explore the ways in which the domestic dog contributes to scientific discoveries. Broad topic areas include the genetic mapping of variants in disease and morphology, population genetics and demography of domestic and wild canids, the inheritance of complex phenotypes such as cancer and behavior, and bioinformatic applications and innovations.

Dr. Dayna Dreger
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dog
  • genomics
  • genetics
  • mapping
  • variant
  • population
  • domestication
  • disease
  • behavior
  • morphology

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
An EHPB1L1 Nonsense Mutation Associated with Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia and Polymyopathy in Labrador Retriever Littermates
Genes 2022, 13(8), 1427; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13081427 - 11 Aug 2022
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Abstract
In this report, we describe a novel genetic basis for congenital dyserythropoietic anemia and polymyopathy in Labrador Retriever littermates characterized by incidental detection of marked microcytosis, inappropriate metarubricytosis, pelvic limb weakness and muscle atrophy. A similar syndrome has been described in English Springer [...] Read more.
In this report, we describe a novel genetic basis for congenital dyserythropoietic anemia and polymyopathy in Labrador Retriever littermates characterized by incidental detection of marked microcytosis, inappropriate metarubricytosis, pelvic limb weakness and muscle atrophy. A similar syndrome has been described in English Springer Spaniel littermates with an early onset of anemia, megaesophagus, generalized muscle atrophy and cardiomyopathy. Muscle histopathology in both breeds showed distinctive pathological changes consistent with congenital polymyopathy. Using whole genome sequencing and mapping to the CanFam4 (Canis lupus familiaris reference assembly 4), a nonsense variant in the EHBP1L1 gene was identified in a homozygous form in the Labrador Retriever littermates. The mutation produces a premature stop codon that deletes approximately 90% of the protein. This variant was not present in the English Springer Spaniels. Currently, EHPB1L1 is described as critical to actin cytoskeletal organization and apical-directed transport in polarized epithelial cells, and through connections with Rab8 and a BIN1-dynamin complex generates membrane vesicles in the endocytic recycling compartment. Furthermore, EHBP1L1 knockout mice die early and develop severe anemia. The connection of EHBP1L1 to BIN1 and DMN2 functions is particularly interesting due to BIN1 and DMN2 mutations being causative in forms of centronuclear myopathy. This report, along with an independent study conducted by another group, are the first reports of an association of EHBP1L1 mutations with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia and polymyopathy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Canine Genetics)
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Article
Genome-Wide Association Analysis for Chronic Superficial Keratitis in the Australian Racing Greyhound
Genes 2022, 13(8), 1328; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13081328 - 26 Jul 2022
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Abstract
Chronic superficial keratitis (CSK) is a progressive inflammatory condition of the eye (cornea) that can cause discomfort and blindness. Differential disease risk across dog breeds strongly suggests that CSK has a genetic basis. In addition to genetic risk, the occurrence of CSK is [...] Read more.
Chronic superficial keratitis (CSK) is a progressive inflammatory condition of the eye (cornea) that can cause discomfort and blindness. Differential disease risk across dog breeds strongly suggests that CSK has a genetic basis. In addition to genetic risk, the occurrence of CSK is exacerbated by exposure to ultraviolet light. Genome-wide association analysis considered 109 greyhounds, 70 with CSK and the remainder with normal phenotype at an age over four years. Three co-located variants on CFA18 near the 5′ region of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) gene were associated with genome-wide significance after multiple-test correction (BICF2P579527, CFA18: 6,068,508, praw = 1.77 × 10−7, pgenome = 0.017; BICF2P1310662, CFA18: 6,077,388, praw = 4.09 × 10−7, pgenome = 0.040; BICF2P160719, CFA18: 6,087,347, praw = 4.09 × 10−7, pgenome = 0.040) (canFam4)). Of the top 10 associated markers, eight were co-located with the significantly associated markers on CFA18. The associated haplotype on CFA18 is protective for the CSK condition. EGFR is known to play a role in corneal healing, where it initiates differentiation and proliferation of epithelial cells that in turn signal the involvement of stromal keratocytes to commence apoptosis. Further validation of the putative functional variants is required prior to their use in genetic testing for breeding programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Canine Genetics)
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Article
SLC25A12 Missense Variant in Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers Affected by Cerebellar Degeneration—Myositis Complex (CDMC)
Genes 2022, 13(7), 1223; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13071223 - 09 Jul 2022
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Abstract
We investigated two litters of distantly related Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers (NSDTR), of which four puppies were affected by cerebellar signs with or without neuromuscular weakness. The phenotype was termed cerebellar degeneration—myositis complex (CDMC). We suspected a heritable condition and initiated a [...] Read more.
We investigated two litters of distantly related Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers (NSDTR), of which four puppies were affected by cerebellar signs with or without neuromuscular weakness. The phenotype was termed cerebellar degeneration—myositis complex (CDMC). We suspected a heritable condition and initiated a genetic analysis. The genome of one affected dog was sequenced and compared to 565 control genomes. This search yielded a private protein-changing SLC25A12 variant in the affected dog, XM_038584842.1:c.1337C>T, predicted to result in the amino acid change XP_038440770.1:(p.Pro446Leu). The genotypes at the variant co-segregated with the phenotype as expected for a monogenic autosomal recessive mode of inheritance in both litters. Genotyping of 533 additional NSDTR revealed variant allele frequencies of 3.6% and 1.3% in a European and a North American cohort, respectively. The available clinical and biochemical data, together with current knowledge about SLC25A12 variants and their functional impact in humans, mice, and dogs, suggest the p.Pro446Leu variant is a candidate causative defect for the observed phenotype in the affected dogs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Canine Genetics)
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Article
A COL5A2 In-Frame Deletion in a Chihuahua with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome
Genes 2022, 13(5), 934; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13050934 - 23 May 2022
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Abstract
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heterogeneous, rare diseases affecting the connective tissues. The main clinical signs of EDS are skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility, and skin fragility. Currently, the classification of EDS in humans distinguishes 13 clinical subtypes associated with variants in [...] Read more.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heterogeneous, rare diseases affecting the connective tissues. The main clinical signs of EDS are skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility, and skin fragility. Currently, the classification of EDS in humans distinguishes 13 clinical subtypes associated with variants in 20 different genes, reflecting the heterogeneity of this set of diseases. At present, variants in three of these genes have also been identified in dogs affected by EDS. The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical and histopathological phenotype of an EDS-affected Chihuahua and to identify the causative genetic variant for the disease. The clinical examination suggested a diagnosis of classical EDS. Skin histopathology revealed an abnormally thin dermis, which is compatible with classical EDS. Whole-genome sequencing identified a heterozygous de novo 27 bp deletion in the COL5A2 gene, COL5A2:c.3388_3414del. The in-frame deletion is predicted to remove 9 amino acids in the triple-helical region of COL5A2. The molecular analysis and identification of a likely pathogenic variant in COL5A2 confirmed the subtype as a form of classical EDS. This is the first report of a COL5A2-related EDS in a dog. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Canine Genetics)
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