Special Issue "The Empirics of Behaviour under Risk and Ambiguity"

A special issue of Games (ISSN 2073-4336).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Anna Conte Website E-Mail
Associate Professor, Department of Statistical Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome
Interests: Econometric modelling of Experimental Data (Experimetrics); Structural Model Estimation; Monte Carlo Simulation techniques; Finite and Continuous Mixture Models; Estimation of Limited Dependent Variable Models; Panel Data; Simultaneous Equation systems; Survey Methodology; Survey Data Analysis
Guest Editor
Prof. John Hey Website E-Mail
Emeritus Professor of Economics and Statistics and Director of the Centre for Experimental Economics (EXEC), Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, UK
Interests: individual decision-making under risk and ambiguity, both static and dynamic, using experimental methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The last decades have witnessed several researchers challenging themselves with the modelling and testing of competing theories of choice under risk and ambiguity. The aim of this Special Issue is to follow in these footsteps, welcoming submissions mainly, but not exclusively, on experimental and econometric studies on this topic. The context can be any, including individual choice, group choice and strategic choice. We encourage the submission of studies which focus on the heterogeneity of behaviour under risk and/or ambiguity and its identification. Literature reviews or appraisals of existing literature are also encouraged. 

Dr. Anna Conte
Prof. John Hey
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Games is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Experimental elicitation of behaviour under risk and ambiguity
  • Estimation of behaviour under risk and ambiguity
  • Expected Utility theory
  • non-Expected Utility theories
  • Heterogeneity
  • Error stories

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Measuring and Disentangling Ambiguity and Confidence in the Lab
Games 2019, 10(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/g10010009 - 18 Feb 2019
Abstract
In this paper we present a novel experimental procedure aimed at better understanding the interaction between confidence and ambiguity attitudes in individual decision making. Different ambiguity settings not only can be determined by the lack of information in possible scenarios completely “external” to [...] Read more.
In this paper we present a novel experimental procedure aimed at better understanding the interaction between confidence and ambiguity attitudes in individual decision making. Different ambiguity settings not only can be determined by the lack of information in possible scenarios completely “external” to the decision-maker, but can also be a consequence of the decision maker’s ignorance about her own characteristics or performance and, thus, deals with confidence. We design a multistage experiment where subjects face different sources of ambiguity and where we are able to control for self-assessed levels of competence. By means of a Principal Component Analysis, we obtain a set of measures of “internal” and “external” ambiguity aversion. Our regressions show that the two measures are significantly correlated at the subject level, that the subjects’ “internal” ambiguity aversion increases in performance in the high-competence task and that “external” ambiguity aversion moderately increases in earnings. Self-selection does not play any role. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Empirics of Behaviour under Risk and Ambiguity)
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