Special Issue "Forest and Landscape Restoration—Making it Happen"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Liz Ota
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Sunshine Coast, 90 Sippy Downs Dr, Sippy Downs, Qld 4556, Australia.
Interests: forest and landscape restoration; tropical forestry; community-based forest management; sustainable livelihoods
Dr. Sharif Ahmed Mukul
E-Mail
Guest Editor
University of Sunshine Coast, Tropical Forest and People Research Centre, Maroochydore, QLD 4558, Australia
Interests: biodiversity conservation; ecosystem functioning and processes; land-use/cover dynamics; forests; rural livelihoods; socio-economic aspects of forestry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Nestor Gregorio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Sunshine Coast, tropical forest and people research centre, Maroochydore, Qld 4558, Australia
Interests: community-based forest restoration; forest nursery and seedling quality; forest and landscape restoration
Dr. Sarah Jane Wilson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Connecticut • PARTNERS restoration network
Interests: Tropical forest restoration; forest ecology; livelihoods; restoration ecology; community forestry; human geography
Prof. Dr. Robin Chazdon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Sunshine Coast, Tropical Forest and People Research Centre, Sippy Downs, Qld, Australia and Professor Emerita, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA
Interests: Tropical forest dynamics; forest and landscape restoration; natural regeneration
Prof. Dr. John Herbohn
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Sunshine Coast, Tropical Forest and People Research Centre, Sippy Downs, Qld, Australia
Interests: Restoration of Tropical Forests; Forest Dynamics of Tropical Forests; Forestry Economics; Tropical Mixed Species Plantations; Socioeconomic Aspects of Tropical Reforestation; Hydrological and Nutrient Impacts of Reforestation; Small-scale and Community Forestry; Carbon Dynamics in Tropical Forests; Climate Change Policy and Forests; Multidimensional Reporting Systems; Management of Tropical Forests

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Globally, Forest and Landscape Restoration (FLR) is receiving increasing attention from governments and agencies for its potential to provide key ecosystem services and to improve human wellbeing. The Bonn Challenge, launched in Germany in 2011 and currently involving 56 nations, pledged to restore 150 million hectares of degraded and deforested areas by 2020 and 350 million hectares by 2030. So far, this is one of the largest initiatives based on FLR approaches. Other key global initiatives include the New York Declaration on Forests signed in 2014 and the Trillion Trees Partnership. Despite the prospect and emergence of FLR in recent years, many aspects of FLR, including governance, guidance for implementation and monitoring, success criteria and indicators, have only just begun to be understood. This Special Issue comprises articles that contribute to our understanding of FLR and of how to improve its planning, implementation, assessment, and monitoring.  The papers in this Special Issue were presented at the International Conference on Forest and Landscape Restoration—Making it Happen, held in Manila, Philippines, on 25–27 February 2019. 

Dr. Liz Ota
Prof. Dr. Sharif A. Mukul
Dr. Nestor Gregorio
Dr. Sarah Jane Wilson
Prof. Dr. Robin Chazdon
Prof. Dr. John Herbohn
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Forest Restoration
  • Livelihoods
  • Tropical Forests
  • Biodiversity
  • Community Forestry
  • Small-scale Forestry

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Lessons Learned from the Water Producer Project in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil
Forests 2019, 10(11), 1031; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10111031 - 15 Nov 2019
Abstract
Forest and landscape restoration (FLR) is a powerful strategy for large-scale tropical forest recovery, and payment for ecosystem services (PES) is used to support FLR programs and projects on privately-owned land. In this article, we discuss the lessons learned from the Water Producer [...] Read more.
Forest and landscape restoration (FLR) is a powerful strategy for large-scale tropical forest recovery, and payment for ecosystem services (PES) is used to support FLR programs and projects on privately-owned land. In this article, we discuss the lessons learned from the Water Producer Project, a pioneer, multiple-stakeholder, and PES-supported FLR project in the Atlantic Forest, south-eastern Brazil. The project was implemented in four landscapes located in two municipalities. Altogether, 41 PES contracts with landowners were signed, resulting in various FLR practices being implemented in a total of 342.4 ha (64.2 ha for riparian forest restoration, 90.8 ha for soil conservation, and 187.4 for forest conservation) of land, which represents 39% of the project goal. As of the end of the project, only 50% (USD 49,250) of the available PES funds had been spent. However, funds spent on project planning, implementation, communication, and monitoring were 12 times greater than those spent on PES. Several challenges restricted the progress and monitoring of the project. The main issue was landowner participation and/or engagement. In terms of lessons learned, we highlight that PES schemes are more complex than initially thought, and that sufficient funding does not guarantee the success of FLR projects. It is essential to promote landowner participation and engagement by considering them key players in FLR projects. Finally, acceptance from landowners was higher and implementation was easier for forest conservation practices that required no land-use changes. Thus, we suggest that similar future projects should focus on targeting private properties in marginal agricultural lands with a high probability of natural regeneration. Alternatively, future projects could focus on lands with remnant forest cover of high conservation value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest and Landscape Restoration—Making it Happen)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication
Restoring Degraded Forest Land with Native Tree Species: The Experience of “Bosques Amazónicos” in Ucayali, Peru
Forests 2019, 10(10), 851; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10100851 - 29 Sep 2019
Abstract
The case is a private initiative in Peruvian Amazon reforesting with native tree species on degraded lands for timber and carbon purposes. By 2018 around 870 hectares have been reforested and additionally 124 hectares are being restored through protection measures and assisted natural [...] Read more.
The case is a private initiative in Peruvian Amazon reforesting with native tree species on degraded lands for timber and carbon purposes. By 2018 around 870 hectares have been reforested and additionally 124 hectares are being restored through protection measures and assisted natural regeneration. The paper describes the local context and project design, the technical and social aspects of project implementation, the outcomes and challenges after 12 years, including some reflections on success factors, lessons learned and implications for other forest landscape restoration (FLR) projects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest and Landscape Restoration—Making it Happen)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication
Collaboration and Conflict—Developing Forest Restoration Techniques for Northern Thailand’s Upper Watersheds Whilst Meeting the Needs of Science and Communities
Forests 2019, 10(9), 732; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10090732 - 26 Aug 2019
Abstract
This paper describes an early example of Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR), which resulted from collaboration between a university, local community, and national park authority in the upper Mae Sa Valley, near Chiang Mai City, northern Thailand. Working together, the Hmong community of Ban [...] Read more.
This paper describes an early example of Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR), which resulted from collaboration between a university, local community, and national park authority in the upper Mae Sa Valley, near Chiang Mai City, northern Thailand. Working together, the Hmong community of Ban Mae Sa Mai, Doi Suthep National Park Authority and Chiang Mai University’s Forest Restoration Research Unit (FORRU-CMU) established a chronosequence of trial restoration plots from 1996 to 2013, to test the framework-species method of forest restoration. The project developed successful restoration techniques and gained insights into the factors that influence villagers’ participation in forest restoration. Recovery of forest biomass, carbon storage, structure, biodiversity and ecological functioning exceeded expectations. Villagers appreciated the improved water security resulting from the project, as well as a better relationship with the park authority and increased land security. Recently, however, tree chopping and a breakdown in fire-prevention measures (perhaps symptoms of “project fatigue”) have threatened the sustainability of the plot system. The project demonstrates the importance of a sound scientific basis for forest restoration projects, long-term institutional support, and appropriate funding mechanisms, to achieve sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest and Landscape Restoration—Making it Happen)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop