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Article

Seed Networks for Upscaling Forest Landscape Restoration: Is It Possible to Expand Native Plant Sources in Brazil?

1
School of Geosciences, the University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia
2
Environmental Science Department, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 18052-780 Sorocaba, Brazil
3
World Resources Institute Brazil, 05422-030 São Paulo, Brazil
4
Instituto Socioambiental, 70297-40 Brasília, DF, Brazil
5
Tropical Forests and People Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sunshine Coast 4558, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(3), 259; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11030259
Received: 12 January 2020 / Revised: 21 February 2020 / Accepted: 24 February 2020 / Published: 27 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest and Landscape Restoration—Making it Happen)
In this paper, we explore how diverse community networks in Brazil have locally advanced seed production and institutional systems to enhance a restoration economy. By focusing on the experiences of the six major native seed suppliers in Amazonia, the Cerrado, and the Atlantic Forest, we estimate the capacity to scale-up community-based systems to meet a large-scale restoration target as a rural development strategy. Over one decade, 1016 collectors traded 416.91 tonnes of native seeds representing, on average, 31.41 kilos yearly and USD 256.5 as household income. Based on this well documented empirical evidence, we estimate that Brazil’s restoration goal would require from 3.6 to 15.6 thousand tonnes of native seeds depending on the share of each restoration method adopted with potential work opportunities for 13.2 to 57.1 thousand collectors yearly and total income from USD 34 to 146 million. We argue that community networks represent feasible arrangements for increasing the availability of plant material sources which provide high socio-economic benefits. For scaling up native seed sources, we suggest the following key strategies: (i) government incentives and subsidies; (ii) enforcement of ecosystem restoration; (iii) community participation; (iv) adaptation of the seed regulations; (v) technological development; and (vi) seed market diversification. View Full-Text
Keywords: ecological restoration; native seed; seedlings; community networks; livelihoods ecological restoration; native seed; seedlings; community networks; livelihoods
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MDPI and ACS Style

Urzedo, D.I.d.; Piña-Rodrigues, F.C.M.; Feltran-Barbieri, R.; Junqueira, R.G.P.; Fisher, R. Seed Networks for Upscaling Forest Landscape Restoration: Is It Possible to Expand Native Plant Sources in Brazil? Forests 2020, 11, 259. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11030259

AMA Style

Urzedo DId, Piña-Rodrigues FCM, Feltran-Barbieri R, Junqueira RGP, Fisher R. Seed Networks for Upscaling Forest Landscape Restoration: Is It Possible to Expand Native Plant Sources in Brazil? Forests. 2020; 11(3):259. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11030259

Chicago/Turabian Style

Urzedo, Danilo I.d., Fatima C.M. Piña-Rodrigues, Rafael Feltran-Barbieri, Rodrigo G.P. Junqueira, and Robert Fisher. 2020. "Seed Networks for Upscaling Forest Landscape Restoration: Is It Possible to Expand Native Plant Sources in Brazil?" Forests 11, no. 3: 259. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11030259

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