Next Article in Journal
Impact of Drought and Salinity on Sweetgum Tree (Liquidambar styraciflua L.): Understanding Tree Ecophysiological Responses in the Urban Context
Next Article in Special Issue
Seed Networks for Upscaling Forest Landscape Restoration: Is It Possible to Expand Native Plant Sources in Brazil?
Previous Article in Journal
Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for Forest Management: The Case of the U.S. Forest Service
Previous Article in Special Issue
Restoring Degraded Forest Land with Native Tree Species: The Experience of “Bosques Amazónicos” in Ucayali, Peru
Open AccessArticle

Lessons Learned from the Water Producer Project in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil

1
Department of Biotechnology and Plant and Animal Production, Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar), Araras-SP 13600-970, Brazil
2
The Nature Conservancy, São Paulo-SP 01311-936, Brazil
3
Department of Hydraulics and Sanitation (SHS, EESC), University of São Paulo (USP), São Carlos-SP 13566-590, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2019, 10(11), 1031; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10111031
Received: 13 September 2019 / Revised: 12 November 2019 / Accepted: 13 November 2019 / Published: 15 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest and Landscape Restoration—Making it Happen)
Forest and landscape restoration (FLR) is a powerful strategy for large-scale tropical forest recovery, and payment for ecosystem services (PES) is used to support FLR programs and projects on privately-owned land. In this article, we discuss the lessons learned from the Water Producer Project, a pioneer, multiple-stakeholder, and PES-supported FLR project in the Atlantic Forest, south-eastern Brazil. The project was implemented in four landscapes located in two municipalities. Altogether, 41 PES contracts with landowners were signed, resulting in various FLR practices being implemented in a total of 342.4 ha (64.2 ha for riparian forest restoration, 90.8 ha for soil conservation, and 187.4 for forest conservation) of land, which represents 39% of the project goal. As of the end of the project, only 50% (USD 49,250) of the available PES funds had been spent. However, funds spent on project planning, implementation, communication, and monitoring were 12 times greater than those spent on PES. Several challenges restricted the progress and monitoring of the project. The main issue was landowner participation and/or engagement. In terms of lessons learned, we highlight that PES schemes are more complex than initially thought, and that sufficient funding does not guarantee the success of FLR projects. It is essential to promote landowner participation and engagement by considering them key players in FLR projects. Finally, acceptance from landowners was higher and implementation was easier for forest conservation practices that required no land-use changes. Thus, we suggest that similar future projects should focus on targeting private properties in marginal agricultural lands with a high probability of natural regeneration. Alternatively, future projects could focus on lands with remnant forest cover of high conservation value. View Full-Text
Keywords: ecological restoration; landowner engagement; forest and landscape restoration; forest restoration; payment for ecosystem services; tropical forest; water ecological restoration; landowner engagement; forest and landscape restoration; forest restoration; payment for ecosystem services; tropical forest; water
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Viani, R.A.G.; Bracale, H.; Taffarello, D. Lessons Learned from the Water Producer Project in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil. Forests 2019, 10, 1031.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop