Special Issue "Recent Advances in Wood Harvesting, Timber Logistics and Road Planning"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Operations and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2022 | Viewed by 1717

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kalle Kärhä
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Forest Sciences, Faculty of Science and Forestry, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland
Interests: digitalization; advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS); sensor technologies; forest operations; logistics; energy efficiency; greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Our global megatrends and operational challenges drive us to operate more efficiently and sustainably. There are currently several comprehensive ongoing research, development and innovation (RDI) studies which introduce the possibilities of improving the cost, energy-efficiency and quality in wood harvesting operations, long-distance transport and forest road planning. For instance, research scientists have upgraded the trafficability forecasts of forest stands by applying remote sensing, weather data and machine learning, or they have utilized multi-sensor technology and deep-learning algorithms to predict and monitor the condition of gravel forest roads for planning timber transports. Moreover, there are interesting studies on automation and teleoperation in forests and on the roads and mill yards of forest industries. Further, the latest topographic and geotechnical data have been utilized in the planning and construction of optimal networks of forest roads. In summary, digitalization with novel multi-source data and artificial intelligence gives us epic opportunities to overcome our challenges and design and build more workable, transparent and leaner processes in the value chain of forest industries.

This Special Issue of Forests seeks RDI papers which depict and report the recent advances in wood harvesting, timber logistics and forest road planning related to the issues of efficiency, biodiversity, costs, added economic value, quality, safety, and the well-being of personnel in daily work in wood supply processes and systems. In addition, I would like to encourage you to submit state-of-the-art papers and technical review papers which highlight the new major themes of our future RDI agenda in the value chain of forest industries to this Special Issue of Forests.

Prof. Dr. Kalle Kärhä
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • digitalization
  • multi-source data
  • sensors
  • artificial intelligence
  • automation
  • decision support systems (DSS)
  • wood supply chain
  • forest operations
  • long-distance transport
  • forest roads

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Computation of Strip Road Networks Based on Harvester Location Data
Forests 2022, 13(5), 782; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13050782 - 18 May 2022
Viewed by 504
Abstract
The location information of strip roads in thinnings and the numerical variables of strip roads are one aspect of timber harvest quality information. The ideal of automatic quality management for mechanized logging is that the quality of the harvest is calculated and reported [...] Read more.
The location information of strip roads in thinnings and the numerical variables of strip roads are one aspect of timber harvest quality information. The ideal of automatic quality management for mechanized logging is that the quality of the harvest is calculated and reported based on data collected by forest machines. At present, quality data is collected by means of laborious, manual, field-based, post-harvest measurements. The aim of this study was to develop an automatic method to compute the strip roads of the harvested stands after harvesting, based on the stem-specific location data of the harvester. Subsequently, the strip road variables were computed from the strip road networks. The computed strip road networks were validated with 21 manually recorded field references. The method was also applied to operational stand data, including 544 harvested stands collected from Southern Finland. The results showed that the computation method produces well-located, stand-specific strip road networks from which strip road variables can be accurately determined, covering the whole stand. Thus, the method promotes the automation of quality management and reporting. The computed strip road networks can also support harvester operator work during the harvesting and, later, the automation of harvesting operations. Full article
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Article
GIS-AHP Approach in Forest Logging Planning to Apply Sustainable Forest Operations
Forests 2022, 13(3), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13030484 - 21 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 870
Abstract
This study represents the first attempt of integration, within a Forest Management Plan (FMP), of a Geographic Information System (GIS) and an Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) approach for the selection of the most suitable logging method. It is important to underline that the [...] Read more.
This study represents the first attempt of integration, within a Forest Management Plan (FMP), of a Geographic Information System (GIS) and an Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) approach for the selection of the most suitable logging method. It is important to underline that the developed methodology is applicable worldwide in each environmental context in which there is a need for planning the intervention and selecting from among several possible logging methods or harvesting systems. Schematically, the main aims of this study were: (i) to develop a GIS-AHP method based on open-access GIS software; (ii) to compare the results of the simulations developed from the statements of two different groups of experts from around the world, to determine the reliability of the predictive probability of the method. The selection of the extraction methods performed with RTS (experts from research and technical sector) input data showed that the most suitable option in the major part of the study area was the cable skidder, followed by the cable yarder, and finally the forwarder. The extraction system selection performed with OS (people from the operative sector) input data revealed limited differences. Thus, considering what was reported above, it is possible to assert that the applied GIS-AHP methodology showed good performance and high consistency in the selection of the best alternatives among different extraction methods. The idea of comparing the results obtained from a survey based on a pool of researchers and forest engineers (RTS) was taken as a target simulation to be evaluated. The method based on data derived from a pool of expert forest operators (OS) was used to check for the results of the other simulation. This is an innovation in these kinds of studies. The results from the consistency check were encouraging, considering that for 51 sub-compartments, only two changed the selected extraction system between RTS and OS. Full article
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