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Special Issue "Effects of Climate Change and Air Pollutants on Forest Tree Species"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecophysiology and Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Takeshi Izuta

Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Plants, Environmental stress, Ozone, Aerosol, Acid deposition, Global warming

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forest tree species can be regarded as life-support equipment because they can provide the oxygen necessary for respiration to living organisms, alleviate global warming by the absorption and fixation of atmospheric CO2, and purify a polluted atmosphere by the absorption and/or adsorption of air pollutants. However, anthropogenic emission of CO2 and air pollutants into the atmosphere causes climate change, such as global warming and air pollution, as well as adverse effects on many forest tree species all over the world. This means that we are turning off this life-support equipment by ourselves. For sustainable development, therefore, we must protect forest tree species against climate change and air pollution. This Special Issue is focused on the effects of climate change, such as elevated air temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration, and air pollutants, such as ozone, acid deposition, and aerosols on forest tree species, and case studies on relationships between climate change and/or air pollution and forests. I hope that this Special Issue will contribute, both to an increased awareness of climate change and air pollution problems, and to the protection of forest tree species against environmental stress. Experimental and field studies on the effects of climate change and air pollutants on forest tree species are welcome to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Takeshi Izuta
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Forest tree species
  • Environmental stresses
  • Climate change
  • Global warming
  • Gaseous air pollutants
  • Aerosol
  • Acid deposition
  • Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide
  • Dry and wet depositions of air pollutants onto forest

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Comparative Genome and Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Gene Selection Patterns Along with the Paleo-Climate Change in the Populus Phylogeny
Forests 2019, 10(2), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10020163
Received: 26 December 2018 / Revised: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 February 2019 / Published: 15 February 2019
PDF Full-text (1670 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Poplars are widely distributed in the northern hemisphere and have good adaptability to different living environments. The accumulation of genome and transcriptome data provides a chance to conduct comparative genomics and transcriptomics analyses to elucidate the evolutionary patterns of Populus phylogeny. Transcript sequences [...] Read more.
Poplars are widely distributed in the northern hemisphere and have good adaptability to different living environments. The accumulation of genome and transcriptome data provides a chance to conduct comparative genomics and transcriptomics analyses to elucidate the evolutionary patterns of Populus phylogeny. Transcript sequences of eight Salicaceae species were downloaded from public databases. All of the pairwise orthologues were identified by comparative transcriptome analysis in these species, from which we constructed a phylogenetic tree and estimated the rate of divergence. The divergence times of the phylogenetic clades were mainly estimated during the Middle Miocene Climate Transition (MMCT) to Quaternary Ice Age. We also identified all of the fast-evolving sequences of positive selection and found some resistance genes that were related to environmental factors. Our results suggest that drought-, H2O2- and cold-stress genes are involved in positive selection along with the paleoclimate change. These data are useful in elucidating the evolutionary patterns and causes of speciation in the Populus lineage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Climate Change and Air Pollutants on Forest Tree Species)
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Open AccessArticle Input-Output Budgets of Nutrients in Adjacent Norway Spruce and European Beech Monocultures Recovering from Acidification
Forests 2019, 10(1), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10010068
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 7 January 2019 / Accepted: 11 January 2019 / Published: 16 January 2019
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Abstract
Soil acidification has constituted an important ecological threat to forests in Central Europe since the 1950s. In areas that are sensitive to acid pollution, where the soil buffering capacity is naturally low, tree species can significantly modulate the extent of soil acidification by [...] Read more.
Soil acidification has constituted an important ecological threat to forests in Central Europe since the 1950s. In areas that are sensitive to acid pollution, where the soil buffering capacity is naturally low, tree species can significantly modulate the extent of soil acidification by affecting throughfall deposition and the composition of litter. A principal difference can be expected between coniferous and broadleaf tree species. The aim of our study was to compare long-term trends in element cycling in two stands representing the main types of forest ecosystem in the region (Picea abies vs. Fagus sylvatica). In the period of 2005–2017, we continually measured element concentrations and fluxes in bulk precipitation, throughfall precipitation, and soil leachates. A continuous decline of acid deposition was detected in both bulk precipitation and throughfall. Declining deposition of S and N in both forests has led to the recovery of soil solution chemistry in the mineral soil, manifested by rising pH from 4.25 to 4.47 under spruce and from 4.42 to 4.69 in the beech stand. However, soil water in the spruce stand was more acidic, with higher concentrations of SO42− and Al when compared to the beech stand. While the acidity of soil leachates from organic horizons was driven mainly by organic anions, in lower mineral horizons it was controlled by inorganic acid anions. NO3 concentrations in deeper horizons of the spruce stand have diminished since 2006; however, in the beech plot, episodically elevated NO3 concentrations in mineral horizons are a sign of seasonal processes and of nearby perturbations. Higher output of S when compared to the input of the same element indicates slow S resorption, delaying the recovery of soil chemistry. Our results indicate that, although forest ecosystems are recovering from acidification, soil S retention and the ability to immobilize N is affected by the dominant tree species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Climate Change and Air Pollutants on Forest Tree Species)
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