Special Issue "Antimicrobial Impact of Substances in Food Matrices"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 3424

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Selvaraj Arokiyaraj
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science & Biotechnology, Sejong University, Seoul 05006, Korea
Interests: microbiome; plant-derived antimicrobials; antioxidant; nanoparticle; food

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, the increases in emerging antibiotic-resistant bacteria have become a worldwide concern. These drug-resistant microbes can also contribute to the risk of food contamination. The negative impact of the use of antibiotics on health (human and animal) is leading to more research being undertaken to evaluate antimicrobial substances, phytocompounds, packaging agents and functional foods to assure food safety. From this point of view, the major aim of this Special Issue is to bring together the scientists from different countries working on the “Antimicrobial Impact of Substances in Food Matrices” and their role in food safety. In exchanging information and ideas  on this issue, the topics include:

  • Natural bioactive compounds, toxicity;
  • Nanoparticles, food pathogen inhibition;
  • Nanospheres, nanocapsules, nanoliposome—food antimicrobial encapsulation;
  • Antimicrobial food packaging;
  • Food matrix, bio accessibility, nutrition food safety;
  • Probiotic, prebiotic;
  • Microbiota;
  • Plant-derived antimicrobials;
  • Essential oils and their application in food safety;
  • Phyto-based antibacterial formulations;
  • Antibiofilm activity, food-borne pathogens.

Original research and reviews are both welcome.

Prof. Dr. Selvaraj Arokiyaraj
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Natural bioactive compounds
  • toxicity
  • Nanoparticles
  • food pathogen inhibition
  • Nanospheres
  • nanocapsules
  • nanoliposome—food antimicrobial encapsulation
  • Antimicrobial food packaging
  • Food matrix
  • bio accessibility
  • nutrition food safety
  • Probiotic
  • prebiotic
  • Microbiota
  • Plant-derived antimicrobials
  • Essential oils and their application in food safety
  • Phyto-based antibacterial formulations
  • Antibiofilm activity
  • food-borne pathogens

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Antibacterial Properties of TMA against Escherichia coli and Effect of Temperature and Storage Duration on TMA Content, Lysozyme Activity and Content in Eggs
Foods 2022, 11(4), 527; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11040527 - 11 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 594
Abstract
Studies on trimethylamine (TMA) in egg yolk have focused on how it impacts the flavor of eggs, but there has been little focus on its other functions. We designed an in vitro antibacterial test of TMA according to TMA concentrations that covered the [...] Read more.
Studies on trimethylamine (TMA) in egg yolk have focused on how it impacts the flavor of eggs, but there has been little focus on its other functions. We designed an in vitro antibacterial test of TMA according to TMA concentrations that covered the TMA contents typically found in egg yolk. The change in TMA content in yolk was analyzed at different storage temperatures and for different storage durations. The known antibacterial components of eggs, including the cuticle quality of the eggshell and the lysozyme activity and content in egg white, were also assessed. The total bacterial count (TBC) of different parts of eggs were detected. The results showed that the inhibitory effect of TMA on Escherichia coli (E. coli) growth increased with increasing TMA concentration, and the yolk TMA content significantly increased with storage duration (p < 0.05). The cuticle quality and lysozyme content and activity significantly decreased with storage time and increasing temperature, accompanied by a significant increase in the TBC on the eggshell surface and in the egg white (p < 0.05). This work reveals a new role for trace TMA in yolks because it reduces the risk of bacterial colonization, especially when the antibacterial function of eggs is gradually weakened during storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Impact of Substances in Food Matrices)
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Article
Evaluation of Lactose Oxidase as an Enzyme-Based Antimicrobial for Control of L. monocytogenes in Fresh Cheese
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1471; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071471 - 25 Jun 2021
Viewed by 766
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous pathogen that can cause morbidity and mortality in the elderly, immune compromised, and the fetuses of pregnant women. The intrinsic properties of fresh cheese—high water activity (aW), low salt content, and near-neutral pH—make it susceptible to L. monocytogenes [...] Read more.
Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous pathogen that can cause morbidity and mortality in the elderly, immune compromised, and the fetuses of pregnant women. The intrinsic properties of fresh cheese—high water activity (aW), low salt content, and near-neutral pH—make it susceptible to L. monocytogenes contamination and growth at various points in the production process. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of lactose oxidase (LO), a naturally derived enzyme, to inhibit the growth of L. monocytogenes in fresh cheese during various points of the production process. Lab-scale queso fresco was produced and inoculated with L. monocytogenes at final concentrations of 1 log CFU/mL and 1 CFU/100 mL. LO and LO sodium thiocyanate (TCN) combinations were incorporated into the milk or topically applied to the finished cheese product in varying concentration levels. A positive control and negative control were included for all experiments. When L. monocytogenes was inoculated into the milk used for the cheese-making process, by day 28, the positive control grew to above 7 log CFU/g, while the 0.6 g/L treatment (LO and LO + TCN) fell below the limit of detection (LOD) of 1.3 log CFU/g. In the lower inoculum, the positive control grew to above 7 log CFU/g, and the treatment groups fell below the LOD by day 21 and continued through day 28 of storage. For surface application, outgrowth occurred with the treatments in the higher inoculum, but some inhibition was observed. In the lower inoculum, the higher LO and LO-TCN concentrations (0.6 g/L) reduced L. monocytogenes counts to below the LOD, while the control grew out to above 7 log CFU/g, which is a >5 log difference between the control and the treatment. These results suggest that LO could be leveraged as an effective control for L. monocytogenes in a fresh cheese. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Impact of Substances in Food Matrices)
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Article
A Study on the Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Peptide 1018-K6 as Potential Alternative to Antibiotics against Food-Pathogen Salmonella enterica
Foods 2021, 10(6), 1372; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10061372 - 14 Jun 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1064
Abstract
Antimicrobial resistance has become one of the major global public health concerns, and it is indispensable to search for alternatives to conventional antibiotics. Recently, antimicrobial peptides have received great attention because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity at relatively low concentrations, even against pathogens [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial resistance has become one of the major global public health concerns, and it is indispensable to search for alternatives to conventional antibiotics. Recently, antimicrobial peptides have received great attention because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity at relatively low concentrations, even against pathogens such as Salmonella enterica, which is responsible for most food-borne illnesses. This work aimed at evaluating the antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of the innate defense peptide, named 1018-K6, against S. enterica. A total of 42 strains, belonging to three different subspecies and 32 serotypes, were included in this study. The antibiotic resistance profile of all the strains and the cytotoxic effects of 1018-K6 on mammalian fibroblast cells were also investigated. Results revealed that MIC (minimum inhibitory concentrations) and MBC (minimum bactericidal concentrations) values were in the ranges of 8–64 μg/mL and 16–128 μg/mL, respectively, although most strains (97%) showed MICs between 16 and 32 μg/mL. Moreover, sub-inhibitory concentrations of 1018-K6 strongly reduced the biofilm formation in several S. enterica strains, whatever the initial inoculum size. Our results demonstrated that 1018-K6 is able to control and manage S. enterica growth with a large potential for applications in the fields of active packaging and water disinfectants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Impact of Substances in Food Matrices)
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