Special Issue "Chemical and Sensory Analysis of Alcoholic Beverages"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Kerry Wilkinson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia
Interests: grape and wine chemistry; analytical chemistry; wine sensory analysis; consumer research
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Dimitra Capone
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia
Interests: wine flavour chemistry; compound identification; chemical analysis; GC-MS; GC-MS/MS; GC-MS-olfactometry; HPLC-MS/MS

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The chemical constituents of alcoholic beverages strongly influence their sensory properties, that is, their aroma, flavor, taste, and textural qualities. This Special Issue will compile research into all facets of the compositional and/or sensory analysis of alcoholic beverages, from the origin of raw materials, to the influence of the production, maturation, and/or packaging; consumer-based studies are also welcome. We invite submissions that explore the relationships between the chemical components, sensory evaluation, and quality of alcoholic beverages. Papers that focus on the development and application of novel methods (chemical or sensory) for the analysis of alcoholic beverages are especially encouraged.

We invite submissions comprising original research and review articles that explore advances in the chemical and/or sensory analysis of alcoholic beverages for inclusion in this Special Issue.

Prof. Kerry Wilkinson
Dr. Dimitra Capone
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Flavor
  • Analysis
  • Alcoholic beverages
  • Aroma
  • Sensory
  • Chemistry
  • Chemical composition
  • Wine
  • Beer
  • Spirits

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Temporal Check-All-That-Apply (TCATA) Reveals Matrix Interaction Effects on Flavor Perception in a Model Wine Matrix
Foods 2019, 8(12), 641; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8120641 - 04 Dec 2019
Abstract
Traditionally, the sensory properties of wine were characterized using a trained panel and descriptive analysis (DA)—a static sensory evaluation method. As wine is a complex mixture, with evolving sensory properties, a way to capture these changes is needed in order to fully describe [...] Read more.
Traditionally, the sensory properties of wine were characterized using a trained panel and descriptive analysis (DA)—a static sensory evaluation method. As wine is a complex mixture, with evolving sensory properties, a way to capture these changes is needed in order to fully describe the sensory experience of wine perception. In this study, temporal check-all-that-apply (TCATA), a dynamic sensory evaluation method, was used to characterize model wine samples reminiscent of a white, hybrid wine. Twelve model wines varied in levels of ethanol, glycerol, and caffeic acid, representing commercial levels in Pennsylvania. Samples were evaluated for up to three minutes by a trained TCATA panel (n = 12) for flavor, taste, and mouthfeel attributes. In general, the experimental factors, ethanol and glycerol, along with interactions between factors, had the greatest temporal effects, with significant differences in flavor attributes occurring within the first 30 s of evaluation, while taste and mouthfeel attributes showed significant differences throughout the evaluation period. Overall, ethanol had the greatest impact on temporal wine perception. The findings of this study further suggest that a temporal evaluation method, like TCATA, should be paired with DA to completely characterize a complex and evolving sample. Further, changes in wine matrix components affect sensory perception both in direct and indirect ways—the latter indicated by taste-taste suppression and cross-modal interaction effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical and Sensory Analysis of Alcoholic Beverages)
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Open AccessArticle
Volatile Composition and Sensory Profiles of a Shiraz Wine Product Made with Pre- and Post-Fermentation Additions of Ganoderma lucidum Extract
Foods 2019, 8(11), 538; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8110538 - 01 Nov 2019
Abstract
Novel Shiraz red wine products enriched with Ganoderma lucidum (GL) extract, a traditional Asian medicinal mushroom, were developed and characterized. GL extract was added at different levels prior to and after primary fermentation to investigate its impact on the juice fermentation [...] Read more.
Novel Shiraz red wine products enriched with Ganoderma lucidum (GL) extract, a traditional Asian medicinal mushroom, were developed and characterized. GL extract was added at different levels prior to and after primary fermentation to investigate its impact on the juice fermentation kinetics, and the chemical composition and sensory properties of the resulting wines. The fermentation kinetics of red grape juice were not significantly different between ferments. Basic chemical analyses plus headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME), gas chromatography‒mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and a rate-all-that-apply (RATA) (n = 65) sensory panel were used to investigate the influence of GL extract additions on wine composition and sensory characteristics. Of the 54 sensory attributes assessed, 39 significantly differentiated the wines. A clear separation between GL wine treatments was evident with PLS regression, where specific volatiles were correlated with relevant sensory attributes that dominated the wines. These products could be promising for emerging wine markets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical and Sensory Analysis of Alcoholic Beverages)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigating Alcohol Sweetspot Phenomena in Reduced Alcohol Red Wines
Foods 2019, 8(10), 491; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100491 - 14 Oct 2019
Abstract
Warmer growing seasons, variations to grape ripening dynamics, and stylistic changes have contributed to increased wine alcohol levels, which can negatively impact sensory properties. As a consequence, winemakers have sought technological innovations to produce reduced alcohol wine (RAW). The sensory methodology used by [...] Read more.
Warmer growing seasons, variations to grape ripening dynamics, and stylistic changes have contributed to increased wine alcohol levels, which can negatively impact sensory properties. As a consequence, winemakers have sought technological innovations to produce reduced alcohol wine (RAW). The sensory methodology used by industry to optimize the ethanol content of RAW is known as ‘alcohol sweetspotting’. However, to date, there is no scientific evidence to support the alcohol sweetspot phenomenon, and the sensory methodology used for alcohol sweetspotting has not been validated. In this study, different methods of presenting wine samples (i.e., ordered vs. randomized, and linear vs. circular) were employed to determine to what extent presentation order influences the outcome of alcohol sweetspotting trials. Two different approaches to statistical analysis of sensory data, i.e., chi-square goodness of fit vs. one proportion tests, were also evaluated. Statistical analyses confirmed alcohol sweetspots were apparent in some sweetspot determination trials, but outcomes were not reproducible in replicate determinations (either by panel or by individual panelists). Analysis of data using the one proportion test improved the likelihood of identifying statistically significant differences between RAWs, but variation in individuals’ sensitivity to differences in sensory properties following ethanol removal prevented validation of the alcohol sweetspot phenomenon based on the wines studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical and Sensory Analysis of Alcoholic Beverages)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Bubbles, Foam Formation, Stability and Consumer Perception of Carbonated Drinks: A Review of Current, New and Emerging Technologies for Rapid Assessment and Control
Foods 2019, 8(12), 596; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8120596 - 20 Nov 2019
Abstract
Quality control, mainly focused on the assessment of bubble and foam-related parameters, is critical in carbonated beverages, due to their relationship with the chemical components as well as their influence on sensory characteristics such as aroma release, mouthfeel, and perception of tastes and [...] Read more.
Quality control, mainly focused on the assessment of bubble and foam-related parameters, is critical in carbonated beverages, due to their relationship with the chemical components as well as their influence on sensory characteristics such as aroma release, mouthfeel, and perception of tastes and aromas. Consumer assessment and acceptability of carbonated beverages are mainly based on carbonation, foam, and bubbles, as a flat carbonated beverage is usually perceived as low quality. This review focuses on three beverages: beer, sparkling water, and sparkling wine. It explains the characteristics of foam and bubble formation, and the traditional methods, as well as emerging technologies based on robotics and computer vision, to assess bubble and foam-related parameters. Furthermore, it explores the most common methods and the use of advanced techniques using an artificial intelligence approach to assess sensory descriptors both for descriptive analysis and consumers’ acceptability. Emerging technologies, based on the combination of robotics, computer vision, and machine learning as an approach to artificial intelligence, have been developed and applied for the assessment of beer and, to a lesser extent, sparkling wine. This, has the objective of assessing the final products quality using more reliable, accurate, affordable, and less time-consuming methods. However, despite carbonated water being an important product, due to its increasing consumption, more research needs to focus on exploring more efficient, repeatable, and accurate methods to assess carbonation and bubble size, distribution and dynamics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical and Sensory Analysis of Alcoholic Beverages)
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