Special Issue "Texture Sensitivity and Consumer Food Preference and Behaviour"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensory and Consumer Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Rossella di Monaco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Italy
Interests: sensory evaluation of food; new sensory methods; human sensory sensitivity; factors affecting consumer food behavior; liking and consumer choice
Dr. Sharon Puleo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CAISIAL - Centre of Food Innovation and Development in the Food Industry - University of Naples Federico II, Italy
Interests: sensory sensitivity; food preference and choice; mechanical and rheological properties of food; psychological traits

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Many intrinsic and extrinsic factors lead people to choose or prefer a type of food instead of another. Among them, sensory sensitivity plays a pivotal role. However, substantial individual variations in chemosensory perceptions exist. It is widely demonstrated that individual sensitivity to taste and odour sensations significantly changes food preference, choice, and consumption, whereas texture and trigeminal sensitivities, and how they could affect food rejection or preferences and choice, are poorly investigated. 

This Special Issue of Foods aims to collect both original research papers and reviews to expand knowledge in the field of individual sensitivity to texture and trigeminal sensations, bringing together insights from interdisciplinary fields. Researchers in physiology, psychology, sensory evaluation, behavioral, and consumer science are kindly invited to submit their works. Articles dealing with methodological issues are highly desirable and very welcome, as well as articles focused on the several relationships existing among the individual variables determining food preferences, food choices or people’s eating habits.

Prof. Dr. Rossella di Monaco
Dr. Sharon Puleo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Texture sensitivity
  • Trigeminal sensations
  • Food preference and choice
  • Psychological traits
  • Consumer eating habits

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Impact of Very Hot Drink Consumption Habits, Age, and Sex, on Taste Sensitivity
Foods 2021, 10(5), 1139; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051139 - 20 May 2021
Viewed by 449
Abstract
The temperature range for consuming hot drinks includes temperatures that can damage cells on the tongue. We hypothesized that the consumption of very hot drinks can lead to a decrease in the ability to perceive low concentrations of tastants. We evaluated the ability [...] Read more.
The temperature range for consuming hot drinks includes temperatures that can damage cells on the tongue. We hypothesized that the consumption of very hot drinks can lead to a decrease in the ability to perceive low concentrations of tastants. We evaluated the ability to perceive low concentrations of five prototypical sapid compounds in 42 women and 40 men aged 18–65. A questionnaire made it possible to collect the usual frequencies (number of unit/day) and consumption temperature levels (medium hot/very hot) for four very common hot drinks (coffee, tea, herbal infusions, and hot chocolate). Our results showed that subjects who consumed very hot drinks (versus medium hot) were less sensitive to sweet (p = 0.020) and salty (p = 0.046) tastes. An aggravating effect of high consumption frequencies was only shown for sweet taste (p = 0.036). Moreover, our data also showed that women were more sensitive than men to sour, bitter, and umami tastes (p values < 0.05), as well as that taste sensitivity decreases with age, especially after 50 years old (all tastes; p values < 0.05). These findings strengthen our knowledge about the influence of sex and age on taste sensitivity, and they provide knowledge on the influence of consumption habits related to hot drinks on taste sensitivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Texture Sensitivity and Consumer Food Preference and Behaviour)
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Article
Oral Sensitivity to Flowability and Food Neophobia Drive Food Preferences and Choice
Foods 2021, 10(5), 1024; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051024 - 08 May 2021
Viewed by 447
Abstract
The study aimed to investigate the role of sensitivity to flowability on food liking and choice, the relationship between sensitivity to flowability and food neophobia, and its role in food liking. Five chocolate creams were prepared with different levels of flowability, and rheological [...] Read more.
The study aimed to investigate the role of sensitivity to flowability on food liking and choice, the relationship between sensitivity to flowability and food neophobia, and its role in food liking. Five chocolate creams were prepared with different levels of flowability, and rheological measurements were performed to characterise them. One hundred seventy-six subjects filled in the Food Neophobia Scale and a food choice questionnaire (FCq). The FCq was developed to evaluate preferences within a pair of food items similar in flavour but different in texture. Secondly, the subjects evaluated their liking for creams (labelled affective magnitude (LAM) scale) and the flowability intensity (generalised labelled magnitude (gLM) scale). The subjects were clustered into three groups of sensitivity and two groups of choice preference. The effect of individual flowability sensitivity on food choice was investigated. Finally, the subjects were clustered into two groups according to their food neophobia level. The sensitivity to flowability significantly affected the liking of chocolate creams and the solid food choice. The liking of chocolate creams was also affected by the individual level of neophobia (p = 0.01), which, in turn, was not correlated to flowability sensitivity. These results confirm that texture sensitivity and food neophobia affect what a person likes and drives what a person chooses to eat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Texture Sensitivity and Consumer Food Preference and Behaviour)
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Article
Preliminary Insights in Sensory Profile of Sweet Cherries
Foods 2021, 10(3), 612; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030612 - 13 Mar 2021
Viewed by 556
Abstract
Sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) is a fruit appreciated by consumers for its well-known physical and sensory characteristics and its health benefits. Being an extremely perishable fruit, it is important to know the unique attributes of the cultivars to develop cultivation or [...] Read more.
Sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) is a fruit appreciated by consumers for its well-known physical and sensory characteristics and its health benefits. Being an extremely perishable fruit, it is important to know the unique attributes of the cultivars to develop cultivation or postharvest strategies that can enhance their quality. This study aimed to understand the influence of physicochemical characteristics of two sweet cherry cultivars, Burlat and Van, on the food quality perception. Several parameters (weight, dimensions, soluble solids content (SSC), pH, titratable acidity (TA), colour, and texture) were measured and correlated with sensory data. Results showed that cv. Van presented heavier and firmer fruits with high sugar content. In turn, cv. Burlat showed higher pH, lower TA, and presented redder and brightest fruits. The principal component analysis revealed an evident separation between cultivars. Van cherries stood out for their sensory parameters and were classified as more acidic, bitter, and astringent, and presented a firmer texture. Contrarily, Burlat cherries were distinguished as being more flavourful, succulent, sweeter, and more uniform in terms of visual and colour parameters. The results of the sensory analysis suggested that perceived quality does not always depend on and/or recognize the quality parameters inherent to the physicochemical characteristics of each cultivar. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Texture Sensitivity and Consumer Food Preference and Behaviour)
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