Special Issue "Volatile and Bioactive Compounds in Raw and Processed Food"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Physics and (Bio)Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Abderrahmane AIT KADDOUR
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UMR F, Clermont University, INRA, VetAgro Sup, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
Interests: fluorescence spectroscopy; chemometrics; dairy products; spectrometry (infrared, fluorescence); analytical chemistry; images analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Serkan Selli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey
Interests: food chemistry; volatile compounds; key odorants; phenolic compounds
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Hasim KELEBEK
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Food Engineering Department, Adana Alparslan Turkes Science and Technology University, Adana, Turkey
Interests: Food chemistry; food bioactive compounds; phenolic compounds; antioxidant activity; liquid chromatography; mass spectrometry

Special Issue Information

We kindly invite you to submit your contribution to the Special Issue entitled “Volatile and Bioactive Compounds in Raw and Processed Foods”. Food processing can be defined as the transformation of raw ingredients and intermediates into products intended for human consumption, with the purpose of improving the digestibility, nutrient contents, flavor, color, safety, shelf life, marketing, and transportation of food. It has drastic effects on the volatile and bioactive composition of foods. We look forward to receiving papers for this Special Issue that address advanced and novel food processing technologies, such as non-thermal plasma, ohmic heating pulsed electric fields, and high hydrostatic pressure, to complement conventional thermal processing technology for the application of various plant and animal matrices as raw materials. Novel food processing techniques will continue to be influenced by different fields and used to respond to consumer concerns about volatile, sensory attributes, and bioactive profiles of foods.

Keywords

  • novel food processing;
  • volatile compounds;
  • bioactive components;
  • food analysis;
  • food quality and safety;
  • health benefits;
  • sensory attributes

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Article
Elucidation of Volatiles, Anthocyanins, Antioxidant and Sensory Properties of cv. Caner Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Juices Produced from Three Juice Extraction Methods
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1497; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071497 - 28 Jun 2021
Viewed by 499
Abstract
This study deals with the characterization of the phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activities of cv. Caner pomegranate (Punica granatum) juices obtained from three different juice extraction methods including halved pomegranate (HPJ), arils (AJ), and macerated arils (MAJ) extraction for the first [...] Read more.
This study deals with the characterization of the phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activities of cv. Caner pomegranate (Punica granatum) juices obtained from three different juice extraction methods including halved pomegranate (HPJ), arils (AJ), and macerated arils (MAJ) extraction for the first time. It was found that the type of the juice extraction process had substantial effects on the volatiles, anthocyanin compositions, and antioxidant activities of the samples. Results showed that the AJ sample (593 mg L−1) had more anthocyanin compounds followed by HPJ (555 mg L−1) and MAJ (408 mg L−1) samples. GC-MS analysis revealed a total of 34 volatile compounds. The highest number of volatiles was found in the MAJ sample (1872 µg L−1); thus, the aril maceration process played an important role in increasing the volatiles as compared to the HPJ (751.8 µg L−1) and AJ (710.7 µg L−1) samples. Sensory analysis showed that the HPJ sample was the most preferred and its general impression was higher as compared to the AJ and MAJ samples. The findings of this study elucidated that the juice extraction technique had a significant influence on the phytochemical profiles, sensory quality, and antioxidant activity of pomegranate juices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatile and Bioactive Compounds in Raw and Processed Food)
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Article
Sensory Lexicon and Major Volatiles of Rakı Using Descriptive Analysis and GC-FID/MS
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1494; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071494 - 28 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1367
Abstract
Rakı is a traditional and Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) alcoholic beverage that is distilled from grape distillate with Pimpinella anisum L. in copper pot stills in Turkey. This study focused on the development of a sensory lexicon, a sensory wheel, using a [...] Read more.
Rakı is a traditional and Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) alcoholic beverage that is distilled from grape distillate with Pimpinella anisum L. in copper pot stills in Turkey. This study focused on the development of a sensory lexicon, a sensory wheel, using a consensus approach and the determination of major volatiles by GC-FID/MS for Rakı. A total of 37 Rakı samples representing all producers were used for volatile and sensory evaluation. The experts identified 78 attributes and references for the lexicon. The main attributes were spicy, anise, sweet, resinous, fruity, dry fruit, floral, head&tail aroma and white colour. The Rakı sensory wheel was created to provide a graphical display of its sensory attributes. For validation of the lexicon, 18 samples were evaluated using descriptive analysis. The results were subjected to PCA to examine the relationship of the samples with the defined sensory attributes. The PCA results show that there is a significant relationship between the Rakı categories and sensory terms and flavour intensities. The GC-MS analyses depicted the following major volatile compounds n-propanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 2 and 3-methyl-1-butanol, ethyl-acetate, acetal, acetaldehyde, trans-anethol and estragole. The characterization of the product using its most distinctive sensory descriptors are important tool and can be used for the industry, marketing, consumer education and scientists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatile and Bioactive Compounds in Raw and Processed Food)
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Article
Visible and Near-Infrared Multispectral Features in Conjunction with Artificial Neural Network and Partial Least Squares for Predicting Biochemical and Micro-Structural Features of Beef Muscles
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1254; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091254 - 08 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 777
Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the potential of multispectral imaging (MSI) data recorded in the visible and near infrared electromagnetic regions to predict the structural features of intramuscular connective tissue, the proportion of intramuscular fat (IMF), and some characteristic parameters [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to determine the potential of multispectral imaging (MSI) data recorded in the visible and near infrared electromagnetic regions to predict the structural features of intramuscular connective tissue, the proportion of intramuscular fat (IMF), and some characteristic parameters of muscle fibers involved in beef sensory quality. In order to do this, samples from three muscles (Longissimus thoracis, Semimembranosus and Biceps femoris) of animals belonging to three breeds (Aberdeen Angus, Limousine, and Blonde d’Aquitaine) were used (120 samples). After the acquisition of images by MSI and segmentation of their morphological parameters, a back propagation artificial neural network (ANN) model coupled with partial least squares was applied to predict the muscular parameters cited above. The results presented a high accuracy and are promising (R2 test > 0.90) for practical applications. For example, considering the prediction of IMF, the regression model giving the best ANN model exhibited R2P = 0.99 and RMSEP = 0.103 g × 100 g−1 DM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatile and Bioactive Compounds in Raw and Processed Food)
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Article
2D-Cross Correlation Spectroscopy Coupled with Molecular Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Analysis of Molecular Structure Modification of Camel Milk and Cow Milk Mixtures during Coagulation
Foods 2020, 9(6), 724; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060724 - 02 Jun 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1116
Abstract
Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) coupled with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) was employed to monitor, at the molecular level, the coagulation of five mixture ratios of camel’s milk (CaM) and cow’s milk (CM) (100% CaM, 75% CaM:25% CM, 50% CaM:50% CM, 25% CaM:75% CM [...] Read more.
Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) coupled with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) was employed to monitor, at the molecular level, the coagulation of five mixture ratios of camel’s milk (CaM) and cow’s milk (CM) (100% CaM, 75% CaM:25% CM, 50% CaM:50% CM, 25% CaM:75% CM and 100% CM). The dissimilarities among the different formulations are highlighted on the synchronous 2DCOS-SFS. In addition, according to the cross-peak symbols in synchronous and asynchronous spectra, the rate of response modification in riboflavin, protein and vitamin A matched with common coagulation phenomena usually reported during chymosin coagulation (hydrolysis of κ-casein, destabilization of casein micelles and aggregation). This study demonstrated that 2DCOS-SFS is a successful strategy to discriminate milk mixtures and to monitor molecular structure modifications during coagulation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatile and Bioactive Compounds in Raw and Processed Food)
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Article
Comparison of the Potential Abilities of Three Spectroscopy Methods: Near-Infrared, Mid-Infrared, and Molecular Fluorescence, to Predict Carotenoid, Vitamin and Fatty Acid Contents in Cow Milk
Foods 2020, 9(5), 592; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050592 - 06 May 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1129
Abstract
The objective of this work is to compare the ability of three spectroscopy techniques: molecular fluorescence, near-infrared (NIR), and mid-infrared with attenuated total reflectance (MIR-ATR) spectroscopy to predict the concentrations of 8 carotenoids, 6 vitamins and 22 fatty acids (FA) in cow’s milk. [...] Read more.
The objective of this work is to compare the ability of three spectroscopy techniques: molecular fluorescence, near-infrared (NIR), and mid-infrared with attenuated total reflectance (MIR-ATR) spectroscopy to predict the concentrations of 8 carotenoids, 6 vitamins and 22 fatty acids (FA) in cow’s milk. A dataset was built through the analysis of 242 frozen milk samples from different experiments. The milk compounds were analysed using reference methods and by NIR, MIR-ATR, and fluorescence to establish different predictive models. NIR spectroscopy allowed for better prediction of cis9-β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin and the sum of carotenoids than the other techniques, with a coefficient of cross-validation in calibration (R2CV) > 0.60 and a coefficient of determination in validation (R2V) > 0.50. Their standard errors of prediction (SEP) were equal to 0.01, except for the sum of carotenoids (SEP = 0.15). However, MIR-ATR and fluorescence seem usable for the prediction of lutein and all-trans-β-carotene, respectively. These three spectroscopy methods did not allow us to predict (R2CV < 0.30) vitamin contents except, for vitamin A (the best R²CV = 0.65 with NIR and SEP = 0.15) and α-tocopherol (the best R²CV = 0.56 with MIR-ATR and SEP = 0.41), but all R²V were <0.30. NIR spectroscopy yielded the best prediction of the selected milk FA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatile and Bioactive Compounds in Raw and Processed Food)
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Review

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Review
Drying Treatments Change the Composition of Aromatic Compounds from Fresh to Dried Centennial Seedless Grapes
Foods 2021, 10(3), 559; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030559 - 08 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 582
Abstract
Raisin aroma is a vital sensory characteristic that determines consumers’ acceptance. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in fresh grapes, air-dried (AD), pre-treated air-dried (PAD), sun-dried (SD), and pre-treated sun-dried (PSD) raisins were analyzed, with 99 and 77 free- and bound-form compounds identified in centennial [...] Read more.
Raisin aroma is a vital sensory characteristic that determines consumers’ acceptance. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in fresh grapes, air-dried (AD), pre-treated air-dried (PAD), sun-dried (SD), and pre-treated sun-dried (PSD) raisins were analyzed, with 99 and 77 free- and bound-form compounds identified in centennial seedless grapes, respectively. The hexenal, (E)-2-hexenal, 1-hexanol, ethyl alcohol, and ethyl acetate in free-form while benzyl alcohol, β-damascenone, gerenic acid in bound-form were the leading compounds. Overall, the concentration of aldehydes, alcohols, esters, acids, terpenoids, ketones, benzene, and phenols were abundant in fresh grapes but pyrazine and furan were identified in raisin. Out of 99 VOCs, 30 compounds had an odour active value above 1. The intensity of green, floral, and fruity aromas were quite higher in fresh grapes followed by AD-raisins, PAD-raisins, SD-raisins, and PSD-raisins. The intense roasted aroma was found in SD-raisins due to 2,6-diethylpyrazine and 3-ethyl-2,5-dimethylpyrazine. Among raisins, the concentration of unsaturated fatty acid oxidized and Maillard reaction volatiles were higher in SD-raisins and mainly contributed green, fruity and floral, and roasted aromas, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatile and Bioactive Compounds in Raw and Processed Food)
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Review
The Effect of Mixing Milk of Different Species on Chemical, Physicochemical, and Sensory Features of Cheeses: A Review
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1309; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091309 - 17 Sep 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1156
Abstract
The yield and quality of cheese are associated with the composition, physicochemical, sensory, rheological, and microbiological properties of milk and with the technology applied to the milk before and/or during cheese processing. This review describes the most important research on cheeses obtained from [...] Read more.
The yield and quality of cheese are associated with the composition, physicochemical, sensory, rheological, and microbiological properties of milk and with the technology applied to the milk before and/or during cheese processing. This review describes the most important research on cheeses obtained from processing mixtures of different milk species and discusses the effect of milk mixtures (i.e., species and mixture ratios) on composition, physicochemical, sensory, rheological, and microbiological properties of cheeses. More specifically, the present review paper will gather and focus only on studies that have provided a clear comparison between cheeses produced from a mixture of two milk species to cheeses produced from only one species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatile and Bioactive Compounds in Raw and Processed Food)
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