Special Issue "New Strategies to Enhance the Digestibility of Meat- and Seafood-Based Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Sun Jin Hur
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, Anseong 17546, Korea
Interests: : development of value added meat products; utilization of bioactive materials; development of in vitro human digestion
Dr. Michelle J. Y. Yoo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Food Science, School of Science, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Interests: value-added food product development; digestibility profile of foods; bioavailability of nutrients in foods; modeling of in vitro digestion process

Special Issue Information

Meat- and seafood-based foods are important supplies of proteins for our diet. Unlike other nutrients, proteins are interesting in a sense that they may refold and reaggregate into a different structure during processing and digestion, and this may have an impact on their overall digestibility. High demand of protein-rich food products by consumers has driven extensive production of food products that are meat- and/or seafood based. However, it will be of no use if these protein-rich food products cannot be digested into absorbable amino acids and peptides that our body could utilize. With increasing concerns over sustainability in farming, it is vital that we maximize the utilization of the available protein sources (meat and seafoods). Through advancement in processing technology, attempts have been made to increase the digestibility and bioavailability of protein-rich food products that are of meat and seafood origin.

In this Special Issue, we are encouraging the submission of manuscripts related to digestibility of protein-rich foods with a focus on meat and seafood. The use of novel processing technology to enhance digestibility, modeling or examination of protein breakdown during digestion, bioavailability of amino acids and peptides during digestion, and development of in vitro digestion models or tools specialized for studying protein digestibility are topics of interest. Through this Special Issue, we aim to advance the understanding of digestibility in protein-rich foods.

Prof. Dr. Sun Jin Hur
Dr. Michelle J. Y. Yoo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Meat and seafood-based foods 
  • Protein rich foods 
  • Protein digestibility 
  • Bioavailability of proteins 
  • Amino acids and peptides 
  • In vitro digestion model

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Pulsed Electric Field Processing and Sous Vide Cooking on Muscle Structure and In Vitro Protein Digestibility of Beef Brisket
Foods 2021, 10(3), 512; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030512 - 01 Mar 2021
Viewed by 501
Abstract
Pulsed electric fields (PEF) in conjunction with sous vide (SV) cooking has been explored for meat tenderisation. The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of PEF–SV treatment on the muscle structure and in vitro protein digestibility of beef brisket. Pulsed [...] Read more.
Pulsed electric fields (PEF) in conjunction with sous vide (SV) cooking has been explored for meat tenderisation. The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of PEF–SV treatment on the muscle structure and in vitro protein digestibility of beef brisket. Pulsed electric field treatment (specific energy of 99 ± 5 kJ/kg) was applied to bovine Deep and Superficial pectoral muscles in combination with sous vide (SV) cooking (60 °C for 24 h). A similar micro- and ultrastructure was detected between the control SV-cooked and PEF-treated SV-cooked pectoral muscles. The combined PEF–SV treatment increased the in vitro protein digestibility of the pectoral muscles by approximately 29%, in terms of ninhydrin-reactive free amino nitrogen released at the end of simulated digestion. An increment in proteolysis of the PEF-treated SV-cooked meat proteins (e.g., myosin heavy chains and C-protein) during simulated digestion was also observed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. More damaged muscle micro- and ultrastructure was detected in PEF-treated SV-cooked muscles at the end of in vitro digestion, showing its enhanced digestive proteolysis compared to the control cooked meat. Full article
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Article
In-Bag Dry- vs. Wet-Aged Lamb: Quality, Consumer Acceptability, Oxidative Stability and In Vitro Digestibility
Foods 2021, 10(1), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010041 - 25 Dec 2020
Viewed by 533
Abstract
The aim of this study was to produce in-bag dry-aged lamb and compare its meat quality, consumer acceptability, oxidative stability and in vitro digestibility to the wet-aged equivalents. Significantly higher pH, weight loss and reduced cook loss were observed in dry-aged lamb compared [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to produce in-bag dry-aged lamb and compare its meat quality, consumer acceptability, oxidative stability and in vitro digestibility to the wet-aged equivalents. Significantly higher pH, weight loss and reduced cook loss were observed in dry-aged lamb compared to the wet-aged (p < 0.0001). Dry-aged lamb had harder and chewier texture profiles and lower colour attributes (L*, a* and b*) than the wet-aged (p < 0.001). The dry-aged and wet-aged lamb were equally preferred (around 40% each) by the consumer panel, underpinning the niche nature of dry-aged meat. Significantly (p < 0.05) higher yeast and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TABRS) levels were observed in dry-aged lamb compared to the wet-aged. There was no difference in fatty acid profile, protein carbonyl content and pattern of proteolysis between ageing regimes (p > 0.05). Ageing regimes had no impact on overall digestibility; however, a greater gastric digestibility was observed in dry-aged lamb through the increased release of free amino acids (FAAs) compared to the wet-aged. Outcomes of this study demonstrated for the first time the possibility of producing dry-aged lamb legs of acceptable quality, oxidative stability and superior digestibility compared to the equivalent wet-aged lamb. Full article
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Article
Effects of Ultrasound Treatments on Tenderness and In Vitro Protein Digestibility of New Zealand Abalone, Haliotis iris
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1122; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081122 - 14 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1018
Abstract
Canned pāua, Haliotis iris, is a premium New Zealand product that is exported to Asia. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of ultrasound treatments on pāua texture, microstructure and in vitro protein digestibility. Whole pāua meat was ultrasound-treated [...] Read more.
Canned pāua, Haliotis iris, is a premium New Zealand product that is exported to Asia. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of ultrasound treatments on pāua texture, microstructure and in vitro protein digestibility. Whole pāua meat was ultrasound-treated (20 kHz, 464 ± 9 W) for 5 min in water (with or without subsequent soaking in water at 4 °C for 24 h) or ultrasound-treated in 1% actinidin enzyme solution. Post-treatment cooking of canned pāua was done in a water retort at 116 °C for 30 min. All ultrasound-treated cooked pāua yielded lower slice shear force values (SSFV) than untreated canned and cooked samples. The lowest SSFV was attained when ultrasound treatment in water was followed by soaking at 4 °C for 24 h. The increased tenderness of ultrasound-treated pāua could be linked to disintegration of myofibers and formation of gaps between myofibers, as observed through histological analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Collagenous fragmentation was also observed, particularly in pāua ultrasonicated in enzyme solution. Raw pāua was found to be more digestible in terms of free amino N released during in vitro digestion than all cooked samples. However, cooked ultrasound pre-treated pāua was more digestible than the control cooked sample. Full article
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